T. E. Martin's scientific contributions

Publications (6)

Article
Tailings management often represents the most significant environmental challenge associated with mining projects. A spate of recent and well-publicized incidents involving tailings impoundments has placed the mining industry in general, and those responsible for tailings impoundment design and safety in particular, under intense scrutiny. Given th...
Article
The evaluation and performance of four upstream-constructed tailings dams in South America are presented. All four dams were constructed beginning in the 1990's. The juxtaposition of the same design to four sites, each with unique site and operating conditions, led not surprisingly to four different outcomes. These outcomes ranged from outright fai...
Article
Full-text available
Upstream constructed tailings dams represent a significant challenge to the geotechnical engineer in terms of analysis of their stability, in large part because the shear strength of the loose sands and fine grained or "slimes" components of such structures is open to considerable uncertainty. In particular, it is critical that the behavior of the...
Article
A good dam surveillance program is the foundation of an overall tailings dam safety program. Tailings dams are dynamic and continually evolving structures, under construction on a regular, and often near-continuous, basis, and have a closure phase that lasts "forever". This is in contrast to conventional, water-retaining dams, which are built in a...

Citations

... Poor tailing management can have major environmental and societal consequences, including the devastation of large areas, populated or of natural value, during major dam failures, the leaching of toxic chemicals and heavy metals and acidification of water ways (rivers, lakes) by oxidation of sulphide minerals resulting in acid mine drainage (AMD) ( Arnesen et al., 1997;Koski, 2012). A recent study on dam storage for mine tailings estimated that there are, worldwide, about 2-5 major (0.1%) and about 35 minor (1%) dam failures per year (Martin and Davies, 2010), some of which have had and still have major environmental and societal additional consequences. ...
... The excavation and removal of ore bodies from the ground leads to the creation of a large volume of underground and/or surface voids, which can cause stope (underground mine cavity) and regional instability [1,2]. Meanwhile, a large amount of tailings generated from mineral processing are deposited into more than 3000 tailings dams at the surface [3], often without any appropriate steps taken to ensure that there are no environmental consequences. This type of surface tailings disposal can result in serious geotechnical (e.g. ...
... In 2019, a massive catastrophic flow failure of an iron ore tailings dam (Feijao I) took place in Brazil causing the pollution of the Paraopeba river and many fatalities. This tailings dam was constructed using the upstream method which builds accumulating vertically the tailings through successive disposals over soft tailings (Kossoff et al., 2014).Upstream tailings dams are considered at high risk because the stability of the tailings facility diminishes substantially the operations cease (Martin & McRoberts, 1999). Static liquefaction of iron tailings was the underlying collapse mechanism of the Feijao I dam which was triggered by loss of suction and creep (P. ...
... Tailing slurry is transported behind the starter dams or subdams, flows, and deposits in the pond. The geotechnical investigation results of several actual tailing dams show that the particle size of tailings deposited in dams is highly discrete in both longitudinal and transverse directions, and its characteristic particle sizes fluctuate greatly with the change of the distance from the spigots [16,17]. The variability in tailings sedimentary structure is more pronounced in different tailing dams due to the different composition of tailings produced by the processing plants and the ore drawing parameters such as slurry concentration and flow rate [18][19][20]. ...
... BAT conclusions have been derived based on the exchanged data and information and by pondering relevant principles, recommendations and developments on extractive waste management proposed in wellconceived international initiatives or peer-reviewed publications over the past 15 years, particularly on extractive waste characterisation (CEN, 2012;INAP, 2014;Lottermoser, 2010), best practices and techniques to reduce the impacts to human health and the environment (Hawley and Cunning, 2017;IFC, 2007a;ITRC, 2010;Kerr and Ulrich, 2011;Martin et al., 2002;Orman et al., 2011;Pinasseau et al., 2018; In addition, different best practices and techniques applied in the management of waste from specific extractive sectors, such as those published by international organisations and/or public authorities (IAI, 2015;IFC, 2007b;IOGP, 2009IOGP, , 2016Kauppila et al., 2013;UK EA, 2016), have also been considered to evaluate the applicability and the relevance of each BAT. Together with the application of a risk-specific approach, this allowed deriving the BAT for a wide variety of sectors and related potential environmental issues (see the relevance identified for the different BAT in the schemes reported in the Supporting Information). ...
... The main tailings dam failure modes, warning signs and what EO-based methods can monitor (Adapted fromMartin and Davies 2000) ...