Suzanne Ive's research while affiliated with University of Sussex and other places

Publications (2)

Article
Reports an error in "Does Barbie make girls want to be thin? The effect of experimental exposure to images of dolls on the body image of 5- to 8-year-old girls" by Helga Dittmar, Emma Halliwell and Suzanne Ive (Developmental Psychology, 2006 Mar, Vol 42[2], 283-292). A substantive error occurs in the Body shape dissatisfaction section on page 287....
Article
Full-text available
The ubiquitous Barbie doll was examined in the present study as a possible cause for young girls' body dissatisfaction. A total of 162 girls, from age 5 to age 8, were exposed to images of either Barbie dolls, Emme dolls (U.S. size 16), or no dolls (baseline control) and then completed assessments of body image. Girls exposed to Barbie reported low...

Citations

... The iconic Barbie was a prime example of shifting norms. The negative perception of Barbie's unrealistic body shape as seen in books and toys spawned a change to more diverse skin tones and realistic body proportions, particularly due to the research studies having indicated the negative impact on young girls (Dittmar, Halliwell, & Ive, 2006; Sherman shopaholic girlfriend with fashion sense to a more modern-day female role model who was a laptop-carrying professional computer engineer (Betz & Sekaquaptewa, 2012). After surveying over 8,000 mothers, the makers of Barbie found 86% of mothers were "concerned about the kind of role models their daughters were exposed to; therefore, Barbie's creator, Mattel, released a new line of historical female role model Barbie dolls such as Katherine Johnson (an African American, NASA "human computer" mathematician), Amelia Earhart (the first female aviator to cross the Atlantic Ocean), Frida Kahlo (a Mexican artist and activist), and many more female role model dolls (Leguizamon & Ahmed, 2018, para. ...
... This is contrasted with the cultural constructs of the self from a Western perspective. The esteem construct represented by Barbie Doll advertisements, for example, implicitly underscore Western marketing persuasion tactics that are designed to shape female consumers' perceptions towards attaining ideal body image through aspirational role models (Dittmar et al., 2006). Portrayal of desirable sexual characteristics are idealised and exemplified in Barbie Doll marketing advertisements. ...