Susan Silver's research while affiliated with Ryerson University and other places

Publications (5)

Article
Full-text available
In this qualitative study, we examine the pathways to vulnerability created by structural unemployment. We focus on a sample of workers often neglected in unemployment studies, namely full-time workers who have held steady employment before job loss. Our sample consists of 29 Canadian workers, restructured from full-time employment and followed for...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we discuss how a group of young mothers, some married or common-law and some single, who were participants in a focus group that was part of a larger project on participation in community-based child and family programs, engage in empowered mothering by resisting the discourse that "a young mother is a social problem." This discourse...
Article
The decade of the 1990s witnessed an unprecedented erosion of the postwar welfare state, with massive restructuring of the labour market away from full-time, sustaining employment. This article examines the experiences of restructured Canadian full-time workers who lost a job because of a company shutdown, relocation, or non-seasonal business slowd...

Citations

... However, the policy change did not affect all workers in Canada to the same degree. Those most impacted by the changes are workers from lower socioeconomic levels-especially women, because of their traditional family role as mothers (McGregor 2004;Nichols, 2014aSilver, Wilson, & Shields, 2004;Silver, Shields, Wilson, & Scholtz, 2005). The demands of motherhood make it more complicated for women to access and remain continuously in the labour market (Nichols 2014a(Nichols , 2014bShields, Silver, & Wilson, 2006;Silver, Shields, Wilson, & Scholtz, 2005;Townson & Hayes, 2007). ...
... Those most impacted by the changes are workers from lower socioeconomic levels-especially women, because of their traditional family role as mothers (McGregor 2004;Nichols, 2014aSilver, Wilson, & Shields, 2004;Silver, Shields, Wilson, & Scholtz, 2005). The demands of motherhood make it more complicated for women to access and remain continuously in the labour market (Nichols 2014a(Nichols , 2014bShields, Silver, & Wilson, 2006;Silver, Shields, Wilson, & Scholtz, 2005;Townson & Hayes, 2007). ...
... In many contemporary societies, activity expectations within these systems often derive from a broader neoliberal emphasis on individual responsibility and activation. This neoliberal emphasis prioritizes activities and decisions that enhance marketability and facilitate rapid (re)employment, such as engagement in skill-building workshops, acceptance of precarious employment, and active job-seeking [22][23][24][25][26][27][28][29]. However, compliance with activity expectations does not guarantee escape from the problems associated with long-term unemployment, given labor market changes, persistent forms of discrimination, and other systemic barriers to sustainable employment [30]. ...
... Clemmens's (2003) meta-synthesis of 18 qualitative studies with predominantly non-Hispanic participants described young motherhood as a hardship, especially when trying to maintain self-growth by continuing school or working while shouldering adult responsibilities caring for a new baby. Two recent studies described the experiences of young, non-Hispanic mothers who participated in community-based parenting programs in Canada (Berman, Silver, & Wilson, 2007;Hamilton et al., 2018). Authors emphasized the favorable and unfavorable components of the program for young mother attendees. ...
... For example, adverse economic conditions and industrial relations reforms aimed at enhancing business flexibility and creating jobs can see labor markets increasingly characterized by insecure, fixed-term, temporary and casualized work (99)(100)(101). These sorts of precarious employment arrangements can undermine the economic security of households, increase social dislocation and isolation (102,103), increase parental stress and marital tension (104), and increase rates of domestic violence (105,106), and child abuse and neglect (107,108). Adverse experiences early in life can have profound effects on mental health and development (109,110), leading to increasing rates of psychological distress, substance misuse, physical health issues, behavioral challenges, and suicidal behavior (111)(112)(113)(114)(115)(116). ...