Susan Maisey's research while affiliated with University of East Anglia and other places

Publications (5)

Article
Full-text available
Depression is a leading cause of disease and disability internationally, and is responsible for many primary care consultations. Little is known about the quality of primary care for depression in the UK. To determine the prevalence of good-quality primary care for depression, and to analyse variations in quality by patient and practice characteris...
Article
Full-text available
Osteoarthritis is the most common chronic disease in the UK, with greater prevalence in women, older people, and those with poorer socioeconomic status. Effective treatments are available, yet little is known about the quality of primary care for this disabling condition. To measure the recorded quality of primary care for osteoarthritis, and asses...
Article
To understand the effects of a large scale 'payment for performance' scheme (the Quality and Outcomes Framework [QOF]) on professional roles and the delivery of primary care in the English National Health Service. Qualitative semi-structured interview study. Twenty-four clinicians were interviewed during 2006: one general practitioner and one pract...
Article
Full-text available
To assess the receipt of effective healthcare interventions in England by adults aged 50 or more with serious health conditions. National structured survey questionnaire with face to face interviews covering medical panel endorsed quality of care indicators for both publicly and privately provided care. Private households across England. 8688 parti...
Article
Full-text available
Payments for recorded evidence of quality of clinical care in UK general practices were introduced in 2004. To examine the relationship between changes in recorded quality of care for four common chronic conditions from, 2003 to 2005, and the payment of incentives. Retrospective observational study comparing incentivised and non-incentivised indica...

Citations

... The UK: National statistics suggest that 64% have a primary care review within 2 months of diagnosis [70], while medical records studies have reported 78% (follow-up offered) [71] and 67% (follow-up attended) [63] within 1 month of treatment initiation. ...
... Although achievement of most individual QIs differed strongly, referral to weight loss programs for eligible patients structurally yielded the lowest percentage in achievement and delivery of information about the importance of exercise the highest percentage in achievement across countries. Previous research identified age [24,27,33,34], level of education [27,34], gender [28], OA severity [27,33], and contact with multiple health care providers [24] as determinants of achievement rates at the patient level. Age might be a significant factor in the interplay of OA achievement rates as the number of comorbidities is likely to rise with age, making it more difficult for health care providers to sort out which disease(s) to address [26,34]. ...
... A meta-analysis published in 2013 highlighted that across 21 studies of people with knee OA, only 13% of people met physical activity guidelines [36]. Suboptimal rates of exercise prescription were also reported by Steel et al. [37], who found that only 26% of eligible people with OA were prescribed an exercise program. Increasing attention has therefore been paid to the factors associated with the (lack of) uptake of this best evidence into clinical practice. ...
... 174 Financial incentives should be relatively low powered to prevent disproportionate focus on rewarded tasks and to ensure sustainability. [177][178][179][180] Performance monitoring should happen alongside implementation of the blended payment model. Under capitation, the payment is divorced from activity, meaning a concerted effort needs to be made to monitor how well health-care providers are doing. ...
... Similar to the introduction of choice and privatisation, the effects on the quality of care following the introduction of P4P have been modest [17][18][19], in line with evidence from studies of P4P in other settings [20][21][22]. Moreover, studies in other countries have shown that financial incentives linked to quality measures can cause unintended effects, such as reduced doctor-patient continuity and reduced attention to activities and patients' concerns not linked to financial incentives [23,24]. Additional studies report criticism from employees due to ethical conflicts and the perceived change of the nature of the consultations [25][26][27]. ...