Susan M. Hughes's research while affiliated with Albright College and other places

Publications (39)

Article
Infidelity is rooted in secrecy and deceit. The deception can include both falsification (i.e., active lying) and concealment (i.e., omission of information) of extrapair liaisons. Infidelity deception can also take the form of engagement in secret online indiscretions. Those who are more likely to engage in infidelity deception possess certain qua...
Book
Psychological research has produced a rich body of empirical data documenting humanity’s propensity to commit infidelity in the context of long-term relationships, but comparatively little work has been dedicated to synthesizing these data into an integrated framework that encompasses the full range of its processes, from why it occurs in the first...
Article
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The dual pathway model posits that spontaneous and volitional laughter are voiced using distinct production systems, and perceivers rely upon these system-related cues to make accurate judgments about relationship status. Yet, to our knowledge, no empirical work has examined whether raters can differentiate laughter directed at friends and romantic...
Article
The human voice is dynamic, and people modulate their voices across different social interactions. This article presents a review of the literature examining natural vocal modulation in social contexts relevant to human mating and intrasexual competition. Altering acoustic parameters during speech, particularly pitch, in response to mating and comp...
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We examined sex differences in preferences for sexual variety and novelty to determine whether the Coolidge effect plays a role in human sexuality. In two experimental studies that employed different manipulations, we found converging evidence that men showed a greater preference for variety in potential short-term mates than did women. In the firs...
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Objective We sought to examine perceived nervous reactions when first interacting with a particularly attractive person/potential romantic partner. From a theoretical standpoint, we cogitate on the possible adaptive nature of these reactions that appear seemingly counterproductive for future mating success. Methods We documented 280 participants’...
Article
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Previous research suggests that binge drinking among young men serves as a “costly signal” to potential mates, such that the binge drinker is capable of bearing the harmful consequences of alcohol consumption. Here, we propose that binge drinking among young adults is conditionally dependent upon the signaler’s willingness to take risks, which is i...
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Research directly comparing empirical data of the behaviors and crimes of male serial killers (MSKs) versus female serial killers (FSKs) within one study is nonexistent. This study sought to make such a direct comparison. We examined sex differences in serial murder that may be byproducts of ancestral tendencies. Specifically, we proposed and teste...
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Facial symmetry is an index of developmental stability and shows a positive correlation with attractiveness assessment. However, the appearance of one’s facial symmetry is not always static and may change when there is facial movement while a person is speaking. This study examined whether viewing a dynamic image of a person speaking (where facial...
Article
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This study examined sex differences in disclosing current, committed relationship status to potential extrapair copulation (EPC) partners. We hypothesized that women in a committed relationship would be more likely to reveal their relationship status to a potential EPC partner. When a woman reveals this information, it may appeal to a man’s evolved...
Article
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Sex, drugs, and rock and roll (SDRR) is a storied trilogy in popular culture. However, in scientific literature, there is little empirical evidence to determine if there is a positive relationship between these three phenomena, despite biological, psychological, and social reasons that would suggest they are connected. Via questionnaire, we asked p...
Article
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Evidence suggests that many physical, behavioral, and trait qualities can be detected solely from the sound of a person’s voice, irrespective of the semantic information conveyed through speech. This study examined whether raters could accurately assess the likelihood that a person has cheated on committed, romantic partners simply by hearing the s...
Article
Several studies have documented women’s evolved psychological preference for mates who provide resources and provisioning, but few have examined specific preferences for what defines “resources” in the modern day. In this study, we examined specific types of modern-day resources women prefer given their age and self-perceived mate value. Specifical...
Article
This study experimentally tested whether individuals have a tendency to associate attractive voices with attractive faces and, alternately, unattractive voices with unattractive faces. Participants viewed pairings of facial photographs of attractive and unattractive individuals and had listened to attractive and unattractive voice samples and were...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We sought to replicate and expand our findings (Harrison & Bowers, 2010) that mass murders were most frequently committed by men who experienced a status threat as a catalyst to the crime. We found 263 cases (in 29 different countries) of male-perpetrated mass murders committed since 1996. Consistent with our earlier findings, 86.9% of these crimes...
Article
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Evidence suggests that people can manipulate their vocal intonations to convey a host of emotional, trait, and situational images. We asked 40 participants (20 men and 20 women) to intentionally manipulate the sound of their voices in order to portray four traits: attractiveness, confidence, dominance, and intelligence to compare these samples to t...
Article
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Previous research shows that the human voice can communicate a wealth of nonsemantic information; preferences for voices can predict health, fertility, and genetic quality of the speaker, and people often use voice attractiveness, in particular, to make these assessments of others. But it is not known what we think of the attractiveness of our own...
Article
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Research has documented the tendency for individuals to change their voices as a function of different emotional and motivational states, but little attention has been devoted to examining voice modulation in romantic relationships. The present research was conducted to determine (1) the way in which individuals alter their voices when speaking to...
Article
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Previous research has largely ignored examining nipple erection in nonsexual situations. We hypothesized that both women and men experience nonsexual nipple erection under emotional and somatic (nonsexual) conditions that trigger autonomic arousal and sought to document nonsexual triggers and instances of nipple erection in various contexts. As pre...
Conference Paper
This study examined how perceptions of a person’s sexual orientation may be influenced by facial bilateral symmetry and sexually-dimorphic facial proportions thought to be influenced by sex hormones. Pictures of individuals who self-identified their sexual orientation were measured for facial symmetry and certain facial proportions. Independent rat...
Article
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Despite the large literature on human reproductive strategies, research on psychology and behavior following acts of sex is scarce. The Post-Coital Time Interval (PCTI) may be particularly important for pair bonding and establishing relationship commitment. This study examined how desires for long-term partner expressions of affection and emotional...
Article
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Few empirical studies have been devoted to exploring behaviors occurring immediately following sexual intercourse. Therefore, this study conducts an exploratory investigation of various post-coital behaviors that the authors propose may reflect the divergent adaptive reproductive strategies of each sex as understood from an evolutionary perspective...
Article
[Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 7(3) of Journal of Social, Evolutionary, and Cultural Psychology (see record 2013-41944-008). The middle initial of author Susan M. Hughes was mistakenly omitted. The name appears correctly in this record, and a modified version of the article has been uploaded in place of the orig...
Article
In response to a commentary provided by Uttl and Morin (2010) regarding the recent study by Hughes and Nicholson (2010), we evaluate their suggestion to modify our study’s design to reduce ceiling effects (similar to that of Rosa, Lassonde, Pinard, Keenan, & Belin, 2008). Also, the commentators failed to take into account our data on reaction times...
Article
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[Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 7(3) of Journal of Social, Evolutionary, and Cultural Psychology (see record 2013-41944-009). The middle initial of author Susan M. Hughes was mistakenly omitted. The name appears correctly in this record, and a modified version of the article has been uploaded in place of the orig...
Article
Full-text available
We examined how individuals may change their voices when speaking to attractive versus unattractive individuals, and if it were possible for others to perceive these vocal changes. In addition, we examined if any concurrent physiological effects occurred when speaking with individuals who varied in physical attractiveness. We found that both sexes...
Article
This study examined self-recognition processing in both the auditory and visual modalities by determining how comparable hearing a recording of one's own voice was to seeing photograph of one's own face. We also investigated whether the simultaneous presentation of auditory and visual self-stimuli would either facilitate or inhibit self-identificat...
Article
Full-text available
[Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 7(3) of Journal of Social, Evolutionary, and Cultural Psychology (see record 2013-41944-007). The middle initial of author Susan M. Hughes was mistakenly omitted. The name appears correctly in this record, and a modified version of the article has been uploaded in place of the orig...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated whether participants could infer a speaker's actual waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and shoulder-to-hip ratio (SHR) based solely on hearing the target's voice. After listening to a voice sample, raters were asked to estimate the speaker's body configuration by choosing from an array of line-drawn figures depicting variations in WHR and SHR...
Article
Although very distinct emotions, facial expressions of those who are experiencing pain/agony appear surprisingly similar to those who are experiencing heightened sexual pleasure. We investigated whether sex differences exist between distinguishing facial photos of males and females expressing either pain or sexual pleasure. Photographs obtained fro...
Article
Previous research (Hughes etal. Evolution and Human Behavior 23:173–180, 2002) has shown that ratings of voice attractiveness are negatively correlated to fluctuating asymmetry (FA, a measure of developmental stability and fitness) but are unrelated to the second to fourth digit ratio (2D:4D, a measure of prenatal sex hormone exposure). In the pres...
Article
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An abundance of unwanted sexual opportunities perpetrated by insensitive, physically and sexually abusive men may be a factor in the expression of homosexuality in some women. In the present study, we examined self-reports of dating histories, sexual experiences, and physical and sexual abuse among lesbians and heterosexual women. Lesbians with pri...
Article
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This study provides a descriptive account of kissing behavior in a large sample of undergraduate college students and considers kissing in the context of both short-term and long-term mating relationships. Kissing was examined as a mate assessment device, a means of promoting pair bonds, and a means of inducing sexual arousal and receptivity. A tot...
Article
We investigated the relationship between ratings of voice attractiveness and sexually dimorphic differences in shoulder-to-hip ratios (SHR) and waist-to-hip ratios (WHR), as well as different features of sexual behavior. Opposite-sex voice attractiveness ratings were positively correlated with SHR in males and negatively correlated with WHR in fema...
Article
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We investigated sex differences in post-copulatory mate guarding behaviors, jealous reactions to opposite- versus same-sex infidelity, and preferences for multiple concurrent sex partners. Results of a questionnaire administered to 448 college students showed that: (1) females were more likely to initiate the practice of sleeping with their partner...
Article
Differences exist between males and females in fat distribution, skeletal morphology, muscle mass, and body shape. We investigated sex differences in shoulder to hip ratios (SHR) and waist to hip ratios (WHR), and their relationships to different features of sexual behavior. Males with high SHR and females with low WHR reported sexual intercourse a...
Article
Full-text available
Low fluctuating asymmetry (FA, a measure of deviation from bilateral symmetry) appears to be a phenotypic marker of reproductive viability and health. In the present study, we investigated whether ratings of voice attractiveness were correlated with variations in FA. Several bilateral traits were measured to calculate a FA index and independent rat...

Citations

... These views dispute the universality of emotion and challenge the notion that certain signals (such as facial expressions) convey unique meanings. This may be one of the most significant recurring debates in nonverbal communication and one that is germane to several papers in this special issue (Farley et al., 2022;Rychlowska et al., 2022;Wood et al., 2022). ...
... Vocal variation is not a static cue, as it has an essential functional role in conveying information about the speaker to the listener (Pisanski et al., 2016). Furthermore, people modulate their voices in different social contexts, such as mating and intrasexual competitive interactions, and these modulations are found to influence social perception (for a review see Hughes & Puts, 2021). Thus, voice changes over the menstrual cycle may only be detected during meaningful speech in the presence of conversational partners. ...
... For example, based on sex differences in parental investment (see Trivers's Parental Investment Theory), human males tend to be less choosy and will be more likely to pursue non-committed mating opportunities than females. These predictions have been supported by a large number of studies (Archer, 2019; Hughes et al., 2020). Furthermore, at a mechanistic level, understanding the neurodevelopmental mechanisms underlying the sexual differentiation of the mammalian brain is integral to the analysis of how sexual dimorphism in cognition and behavior, including sexual behavior, emerges Luoto & Varella, 2021). ...
Reference: Darwin's Theory
... Individuals with restricted sociosexual orientation typically require more time and stronger attachment to, commitment to, and closeness with romantic partners before entering a sexual relationship with them, while individuals with unrestricted sociosexual orientation require less time with and weaker attachment to romantic partners before engaging in sex with them. Sociosexuality has remained a central concept in evolutionary psychology and sex research over the past 30 years (Hughes et al., 2020;Kanazawa, 2020;Kanazawa & Apari, 2009). ...
... Despite some theoretical objections, the role of sex ratio at local level (i.e., states, counties, municipalities) has been analyzed for a wide range of risk-taking behaviors. For example, US communities with male-skewed sex ratios showed a relation with higher levels of binge drinking in males but not in females (Aung et al., 2019). Additionally, countries with male-skewed sex ratio showed higher tendency towards extreme risk-taking behaviors such as male suicide attacks (Gibson, 2011). ...
... With respect to the present study, gruesome crimes may involve sexual aberration, such as in the case of serial murder. Evidence suggest that a typical modus operandus of male serial killers is sexual predation and violence, often involving sexual mutilation and even necrophilia, with some perpetrators even revisiting deceased victims' remains for repeated sexual contact (Harrison et al. 2019;Hickey 2013;Miller 2014, for review). Therefore, we expected CASE to be related to interest in serial killing and other morbid topics. ...
... The influence of repeated exposure on the judgment of facial attractiveness in social information could be investigated in the future. Lastly, this study focused on static faces, but dynamic faces convey more information than static faces (Hughes & Aung, 2018). Thus, the impact on the attractiveness of dynamic faces should be examined in follow-up studies. ...
... However, although musicality has a moderate genetic basis, musical ability and mating success were negatively associated in a twin study (Mosing et al., 2015). Further evidence against the sexual selection hypothesis of music includes the finding that musicians and non-musicians reported similar sexual activity (Harrison and Hughes, 2017). ...
... Despite the brevity of the laughter segments, and in support of H1, raters could identify whether the laugh was directed at a friend or a romantic partner with greater than chance accuracy (M = .57, SD Additionally, these findings further the body of work on "thin slices" that posits that people can make reasonably accurate assessments of others based on only minimal observations (Ambady & Rosenthal, 1992), and the vocal channel in particular (Farley et al., 2013;Hughes et al., 2010;Hughes & Harrison, 2017). The failure to support a female advantage on this task (H4) might be related to the lack of power in this study, which is ameliorated in Study 3. ...
... In the ancestral environment, females were physically smaller (Kappelman, 1996) and would have needed male resources and protection to ensure their survival and the survival of their offspring. Although contemporary women have self-sufficiency and can survive and thrive on their own, these preferences still seem to persist in the modern day (Hughes & Aung, 2017). Men with at least average resources would have been able to provide resources for female partner and offspring survival (Li et al., 2002;Li & Meltzer, 2015). ...