Suresh Srivastva's research while affiliated with Case Western Reserve University and other places

Publications (9)

Chapter
It’s been thirty years since the original articulation of “Appreciative Inquiry in Organizational Life” was written in collaboration with my remarkable mentor Suresh Srivastva (Cooperrider & Srivastva, 1987). That article – first published in Research in Organization Development and Change – generated more experimentation in the field, more academi...
Article
This paper develops the construct of organizational hope as a methodological imperative for studying and strengthening organizations. It calls on organizational scholars and practitioners to move beyond the critical impulse by advancing "textured vocabularies of hope" that affirm the best and most promising dimensions of social and organizational l...
Article
In this paper we direct the field of management and organization learning toward the betterment of the global human condition. Through the metaphor of the global meeting, we develop the core agenda for scholarship in management and organization learning: learning for positive global change, cooperative advantage and anticipatory learning, learning...
Article
The organization dimensions of global change represent afresh arena of organizational scholarship demanded by the global exigencies of our moment in history, a moment where, for the first time, the scale and character of human action has measurable impacts on the natural environment, as well as societal transformations and our collective consciousn...
Article
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This chapter presents a conceptual refiguration of action-research based on a "sociorationalist" view of science. The position that is developed can be summarized as follows: For action-research to reach its potential as a vehicle for social innovation it needs to begin advancing theoretical knowledge of consequence; that good theory may be one of...

Citations

... Results here build on this knowledge, whilst also highlighting that AI played a significant role in the coaches' development through its generative capacity to engineer change (Bushe, 2011). The themes presented highlight the benefits associated with an AI approach, namely the development of an agile appreciative learning culture, and an integration of efforts to maximise potential (Bushe & Kassam, 2005;Cooperrider, 2017). Collaboration in coach development is clearly not a new phenomenon. ...
... In contrast, supervisory leaders are concerned with the day-to-day operation of a company (Katz & Kahn, 1978). Leadership at this level is more focused, short-term in outlook, and is characterized by greater brevity and fragmentation than leadership at higher hierarchical levels (Jonas, Fry, & Srivastva, 1990; Pavett & Lau, 1983). Real-time internal roles ...
... Kepemimpinan transaksional lebih bergantung pada "perdagangan" antara pemimpin dan pengikut dimana pengikut dikompensasi untuk pertemuan khusus tujuan atau kriteria kinerja (Sharma, 1987). Pemimpin transaksional pertama akan memvalidasi hubungan antara kinerja dan hadiah dan kemudian menukarnya dengan respons yang sesuai yang mendorong bawahan untuk meningkatkan kinerja (Jung, 2001). ...
... approach (AI), which focuses on strengths and aspirations rather than problems and weaknesses. The AI approach was primarily created as a tool for business organisational development to shift mindsets from analysing problems to charting positive possibilities (Cooperrider & Srivastva, 1987;Russell & Harshbarger, 2003) and developed as a research framework (e.g. Reed, 2007). ...
... As reflection has been closely linked with effective learning, learning has been closely aligned to effective change. A range of researchers have discussed the positive linkage between effective change and organizational and personal learning (Fiol and Lyles 1985;Huber 1991;Argyris 1992;Srivastva et al. 1995). Such an approach works on the premise that the outcome of learning is new knowledge that can be applied to dealing with the organizational and personal challenges that change brings (Beckhard and Pritchard 1992). ...
... In this case, the surrounding resources (such as knowledge, skill, and social network) will be mobilized to explore new markets and technologies through integrating emotion among members to solid strategic certainty and skill exploration (Venkatraman, 1989;Teece et al., 1997;Meyer et al., 2009;Ganter and Hecker, 2013), to build gain spiral of organizational resources, and eventually to satisfy the demands of organizational innovative resources (Zahra, 1996). Extant research shows that the perception of hope and encouragement can prompt employees to make use of experience, skill, and social networks to constructively probe inconsistent ideas, diverge from the status quo, and motivate risk-taking behaviors (Ludema et al., 1997;Harries, 2003;Akgün et al., 2008). As Jurkiewicz and Giacalone (2004) proposed, when organizations instill hope and happiness among employees, they are more able to handle stress stemming from the work environment, and thus enhance organizational innovation. ...
... As David Cooperrider, of the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University said many years ago, we have the resources and the technology to solve the big intractable problems that threaten the future of humanity: food security, climate change, epidemics, energy depletion. What we need is the knowledge of how to manage the human dimension (cf., Bilimoria, Cooperrider, Kaczmarski, Khalsa, Srivastva & Upadhayaya, 1995). And the best knowledge about management? ...