Sun Wah Poon's research while affiliated with The Hong Kong Polytechnic University and other places

Publications (40)

Conference Paper
Full-text available
The construction industry is notorious for its high rate of accidents. Compensation pay-outs cost companies huge sums of money. Existing safety indices were usually built based on survey and interview results. This research attempts to provide a better understanding on the relative importance of the factors that lead to construction accidents based...
Article
Full-text available
Public housing (PH) has existed in Hong Kong for six decades. Previous and current challenges that have been encountered over time function as a collective driver for design progression. However, such challenges have remained under research to be able to draw useful lessons from them. To understand how this established motif can suit the sustainabi...
Article
Full-text available
Mega-events are popular catalysts for launching area-based urban renewal. However, their built legacies are problematic due to a lack of planning. Besides a much-needed shift in mindset, legacy planning methodology holds the key. This chronic issue is gaining renewed attention with the recent rise of new-generation hosts such as China where massive...
Chapter
There is an increase in the number of construction accidents in recent years in Hong Kong. While most of the previous studies focus on the causes of accidents and the associated costs the research on motivation of safety behaviors among construction practitioners is relative scarce. This chapter sheds light on the findings of a questionnaire survey...
Chapter
Full-text available
In many places, construction accident rates are high. While construction companies incur a huge sum of money for compensation in accidents, the injured workers suffer from loss of income and even capacity to work. As implementation of construction safety measures and relevant regulations require the knowledge of construction accident causes, this r...
Article
Purpose – This paper aims to seek a greater understanding of the conceptualization of mega-event flagship (MEF) development as a point of departure to forge the much-needed organizational capacities in these regions. An MEF constitutes a temporarily themed venue for a mega-event and a transforming force on corresponding urban renewal. The unfailing...
Article
Full-text available
A mega-event-led-urban renewal (MELUR) has been a popular but controversial urban renewal instrument worldwide. Adding to the persisting difficulty in the post-event uses of its physical legacies is an emerging dilemma of initiating spatial regeneration in an environmentally degenerated urban setting. This seems especially imperative for host citie...
Article
A mega-event flagship (MEF) refers to a one-off venue for a mega-event and a pacemaker for regional urban renewal. To achieve this dual mandate requires a clear identification and definition of its functional positions in both short and long terms. Despite repeated suboptimal precedents, scant attention is paid to the actual programming process whi...
Article
Full-text available
For decades the Hong Kong construction industry has been characterized by a stressful work environment and with a poor safety record. Construction personnel under prolonged job stress are more prone to making errors which can eventually lead to fatal construction accidents. Further, the job burnout experienced by construction personnel can reveal t...
Article
Full-text available
China's large public buildings (LPBs) often become problematic after only a few years' operation, leading to shortened building lifespans. Lacking architectural programming was identified by the industry regulators as a contributing factor to this. Despite a policy shift on the government side since 2007, little evaluation of the actual situation h...
Chapter
Full-text available
Construction accident rates have remained unacceptably high in Hong Kong. Despite huge sums of money invested in implementing safety tools by contractors and developers, the total compensation remains high. Likewise construction academics have developed many accident causation models in an attempt to find out causes of accidents. This paper aims at...
Article
The international construction business is witnessing a trend toward the delivery of projects through the adoption of innovative procurement systems that allow companies to gain competitive advantages and to potentially deliver enhanced value to society. Notably, Chinese companies are making steady inroads into the international construction market...
Chapter
Full-text available
Construction industry plays an important role in global economy and comprises a number of sectors. The high accident rates, however, remain problematic in many countries. This chapter aims at reviewing the literature on causes of construction accidents. It sheds light on the 7 indirect factors, namely human, economics, hectic schedule, legislation...
Article
Hong Kong’s construction industry has shown substantial improvement in safety over the past decade. Many safety measures have been implemented such as Independent Safety Audit Scheme, The Occupational Health and Safety Assessment Series etc. With the help from Logit model, this chapter aims at testing the effectiveness of various construction safet...
Chapter
Gone are the days when knowledge sharing depends solely on face-to-face meetings. With the help of Web 2.0, rapid and dynamic cross border knowledge sharing among construction safety researchers become possible. Nevertheless, empirical observation has shown that researchers are falling behind the curve. Generally speaking, there are two major types...
Chapter
The Hong Kong construction industry has been characterized by a stressful work environment together with a poor safety record. The construction professionals always have to face the immense pressure from the tight schedule. Job burnout is thus experienced by many who particularly work on site. There is a thinking that burnout experienced by these c...
Chapter
As the workers, safety officers and managers, and senior managerial staff holds different views on effectiveness of various safety measures in the interviews recorded in the previous Chapter, 3 case studies were selected to investigate how the safety measures are carried out and the factors that can affect the effectiveness of the safety measures.
Chapter
Full-text available
Construction industry is one of the most high risk industries around the world. The huge direct and indirect costs become one of the major motivators in provision of safety measures. This chapter reviews 1) the global accident rates, 2) direct costs of accidents which include monetary compensation for the companies and the financial loss for the co...
Chapter
Full-text available
Developed countries are richer with ample resources while developing countries commonly suffer from monetary resources. This chapter aims at reviewing safety measures in 4 developed countries: Australia, Singapore, the United States and France, and 4 developing countries: Bermuda, China, Kuwait and Egypt.
Chapter
Full-text available
In Hong Kong’s construction industry, safety managers and officers introduce safety measures to their employers and contractors. The senior managerial staff approves the measures. While the workers are the ones who use these safety measures, seldom could we see their involvement in the whole safety measures design. This chapter, therefore, aims at...
Chapter
Hong Kong is notorious for her high construction accident rates. Although the accident rate has dropped from 350 per 1,000 workers in mid 1980–1960 per 1,000 workers in 2007, it still accounted for nearly one-fifth of all the industrial accidents in Hong Kong. Contractors were economically pressed and battered by exorbitant compensation over the ye...
Chapter
Full-text available
Of the many reasons which motivate employers to provide safety measures, the insurmountable expenditure on accident compensation and the associated legal fees are one of the most important concerns. In the UK, accident compensation and related legal system developed slowly before the industrial revolution but the pace quickened after that. This cha...
Article
Purpose ‐ A mega-event flagship (MEF) refers to a popular instrument developed for staging a mega-event and catalyzing area-based urban regeneration. Despite its lasting appeal and controversial nature, insufficient research on its critical early stage has been done to provide useful analysis. When the clients lack appropriate capabilities to confr...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
1953年石硖尾發生大火,香港政府爲安置災民而興建公屋﹐掀開了房屋發展史上新的一頁。時至今日,約有一半的香港人口住在公營房屋﹐政府亦成了最大的房屋開發商。有見及此,建造可持續發展的公共房屋對香港尤其重要﹔而傳統中國文化中的結合概念;有機和諧、天人合一的自然觀;求變、創新的想法可帶給持續發展一些新的思維。本文首先討論西方的可持續發展的概念,從宏觀的角度分析它對氣候變化的重要性、然後闡述香港公共房屋概覽及可持續發展的概念在公共房屋的應用,最後探討中國文化如何能夠結合西方的可持續發展概念,應用在公共房屋上,產生新的火花 In 1953, a big fire broke out in Shek Kit Mei. To provide the roofs for these victims, th...
Article
The lack of a proper building care culture has led to serious problems of urban decay in most developed cities, threatening community health and safety. To arrest urban decay, redevelopment is a commonly adopted approach for regenerating rundown areas. Redevelopment often results in negative outcomes such as disturbances to existing social networks...
Article
Approximately 4% of the private buildings in Hong Kong are older than their design lives of 50 years. In addition to the engineering factor, the lack of timely maintenance and proper management has led to a serious problem of building dilapidation in the old urban areas. On account of the high-rise high-density urban setting in Hong Kong, the probl...
Article
Pomanjkanje prave kulture skrbi za stavbe je v večini razvitih mest pripeljalo do resnih težav zaradi propadanja mestnih predelov, in to ogroža zdravje in varnost mestnih skupnosti. Sanacija je pristop, s katerim navadno ustavimo propadanje in obnovimo propadajoča območja. Pogosto pa ima tudi negativne posledice; zmoti lahko delovanje obstoječih so...
Article
Coupled with the growing number of aged private residential buildings, the lack of proper building care culture has led to serious problems of building dilapidation and urban decay in Hong Kong, particularly in the old urban areas. Not only is the cityscape ruined, but also the health and safety of the residents and general public as a whole are je...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Hong Kong is experiencing a massive increase in construction output. However, the cost of work-related accidents and ill-health in the construction industry account for as much as 8.5% of project costs when social, direct and indirect costs are included. The industry in general is receptive to change and becoming more OHS conscious but the forces d...
Article
Full-text available
Gone are the days when knowledge sharing depended solely on face-to-face meetings. With the help of Web 2.0, rapid and dynamic cross-border knowledge sharing among construction safety researchers has become possible. Nevertheless, empirical observation has shown that researchers are falling behind the curve. Generally speaking, there are two major...
Article
The mega-event flagship (MEF) has enjoyed an increasing global popularity in mega-event catalysed urban renewal practices. Nevertheless, failures of heavily underused MEFs provide a reality check for those ambitious host cities. Even in the wake of the problem being ‘globalized’, related research is tangential, sporadic and reactive, which puts eme...
Article
Arguably, Building Information Modeling (BIM) is bringing a paradigm shift in the construction industry. Benefits of BIM, such as quality improvement, on time completion, cost saving, elimination of unbudgeted change, productivity increase have been investigated. However, few articulate it as a learning tool for a project team to familiarize itself...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
To keep a healthy and energetic workforce in the construction industry is not only economical but also socially sustainable. This paper explores issues of occupational health of construction professionals through building a sustainable organizational worklife by effective management of job stress. Using Leiter and Maslach's (2004) theoretical model...
Article
Full-text available
Constructions accidents have led to many workers in Hong Kong seriously injure or even die every year. Huge sum of money has been spent on compensation by contractors. Lack of safety knowledge is one of the causes behind these accidents. While information technology has become part of the indispensible lives among youngsters and teenagers, it is fo...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The expected increase in output within the next two years with the onset of the MTR projects presents a serious dilemma. Accident rates mirror output in the construction industry and we should anticipate a significant increase in the accident rate with the increase in output. Thus, it is necessary to plan now for the expected upturn - the situation...

Citations

... An enterprise that sustains a lot of injuries and accidents will be unattractive to current and future investors, and the public (British Safety Council, 2014). Thus, if proper safety measures are implemented to prevent or reduce the occurrence of accidents and injuries, the organisation's reputation will be in tact (Li & Poon, 2013). ...
... Workers may think that they are able to get the job done without following safety rules and procedures. Their "can do" attitude creates vicious circle by never saying no to unreasonable demands from clients on speed, such as the four-day floor cycle can hardly be achieved in other locations (Rowlinson, Yip & Poon, 2008). ...
... Accidents caused by unsafe acts lead to an increase in costs, and this situation is due to productivity losses (Ismail et al., 2012). Similarly, Li and Poon (2013) found that a significant amount of financial resources are spent on compensation and litigation due to accidents. This increase in project cost has a significant negative impact on, inter alia, clients' return on investment (ROI), contractors' profits and insurance premiums. ...
... Examining strategies for physical urban renewal around the world entails examining diverse approaches. For example, in Hong Kong, the perspective is holistic, as key design factors serve as a basis for sustainable urban regeneration [11]. In Singapore, the focus is mainly related to upgrading existing public housing buildings for more sustainable public housing [12]. ...
... Some of the identified effects in this study are salary costs for replacement staff or overtime payments, production and productivity losses, retaining costs, personal injury claim compensation, repair cost, quality failure and dispute and litigation. Li and Poon (2009) expressed that there was an excessive number of court cases in Hong Kong with respect to worker's compensation for non-fatal construction accidents. Others effects in Hong Kong construction industry are time loss of schedule, conflicts and legal issues, worker psychology. ...
... International Research Symposium -University of Vocational Technology/156 construction sites, use of inappropriate construction equipment, physical pressure; and chemical influence. Another research carried out in the USA investigated causes of accident such as lack of training, insufficient authorization of safety, use of unsafe equipment, hazardous techniques, lack of site management, and lack of supervision (Abdelhamid and Everett, 2000;Ahmed and Sobuz, 2017;Kadiriet al., 2014;and Li and Poon, 2013). The causes of accidents in the China construction industry were lack of supervision, lack of training, insufficient safety budget, reckless operations, inexperienced labour, unprotected equipment, ineffectual security system, unsafe material transportation, unsafe material stockpiling, lack of cooperation tight time schedules, lack of safety management, lack of innovation, and poor data reporting system (Rahim et al., 2008;and Jokkaw and Tongthong, 2016). ...
... According to the nature of construction sites and previous experience of failure, purpose-built training facilities that physically simulate the construction site (de Vries et al. 2004) are often built. They are available in the United Kingdom, Australia, the Netherlands and Hong Kong (Li and Poon 2013b). In VR training, workers can decide on a course of action, implement the action and immediately observe the results. ...
... Etemadi et al. (2020) mentioned that social media could solve the problem of interrupted knowledge sharing processes due to the project-based and fragmented nature of the construction industry. Li and Poon (2013) concluded that Web 2.0, the Internet of things, and mobile apps enable people to create web content, socialise with others, and share knowledge online. Yao, Li, Song, and Crabbe (2021) studied how construction safety information was disseminated on Twitter and pointed out that Twitter can motivate users to share knowledge, opinions, and ideas through social network analysis. ...
... These three criterion fit our present study perfectly. Furthermore, case studies enables the researchers to obtain in depth information (Li & Poon, 2013)"[b]y adopting a case study design and integrating multiple sources of data…new insights [are] uncovered about the knowledge informing this process. The integration of several data sources means that the strengths and limitations of the different methods are counterbalanced to add rigor, depth and breadth" (Appleton & Cowley, 2008). ...
... This result corresponds to the findings addressed in the literature review and questionnaire survey. In most cases, the workers are required to work under poor conditions due to the site limit and the need for reducing influence on the occupiers (Li et al. 2015). An example was demonstrated by Interviewee C: "In the projects of renovation in a commercial building with a curtain wall, the renovated areas are usually isolated by physical barriers like hoarding and the air-conditioning inside cannot be turned on during the work to avoid introducing the construction pollutants into the occupied areas. ...