Sule E. Egya's research while affiliated with Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and other places

Publications (8)

Article
Nigeria’s diverse cultures, religions and political parties appear to be unified by a strong taboo against homosexuality and gay rights. This has affected academic research, HIV/AIDS programmes, and sexuality education, all which commonly show evidence of heterosexism, self-censorship and even explicit condemnations of homosexuality. Yet a dissiden...
Article
This essay analyses recent poetry in Nigeria, especially poetry produced after 1988, the year in which the anthology Voices from the Fringe, edited by Harry Garuba, announced the emergence of a new generation of Nigerian poets. One of the peculiarities of this poetry is its formation and deployment of animal images, specifically the use of ugly, de...
Article
: In 1988, the anthology Voices from the Fringe: an ANA Anthology of New Nigerian Poetry edited by Harry Garuba introduced a crop of new Nigerian poets. Each of the poets featured was new in the sense that he/she had not previously published any collection. It was a period of military oppression in Nigeria. Some of the new poets have been writing,...
Article
Over the years, Nigerian feminist discourse seems to have shifted its focus from the plight of the servile housewife or the peasant woman to the engagements, whether restricted or not, of the professional woman in her (urban) society. This shift in paradigm is the main thrust of my article. Using the novels of Zaynab Alkali and Akachi Adimora-Ezeig...
Article
New poets in Nigeria continue to historicise the decades of despoliation and despondency during which Nigeria suffered undue militarisation. Subjecting artistry to the exigencies of the society, the new poets, projecting themselves as ‘town criers’ (in the sense Christopher Okigbo uses the word), evolve an artistic vision that centres on the plight...
Article
Remi Raji, one of the loudest and most eloquent political poets in Nigeria today, sees his craft as a means of conveying serious social message to his land. Raji's consummate political theme, which is powered by what he calls "the nationalist imagination," is skillfully explored in his latest volume of poetry, Lovesong for My Wasteland (2005), more...

Citations

... There is a crucial continuity between the second and the third generation of Nigerian writers. Activists and writers such as Clement Nwankwo (1999), Heather Hewett (2005), and Sule E. Egya (2011; is a movement away from "the 'dying for the nation' sentiment that dominated earlier nationalist narratives" ("Power Shift" 12). Through this assertion, Adéèkó points to the fact that unlike the novels of the first generation, where the individual's allegiance to the community conditions his or her choices, characters' sense of self is more acutely foregrounded in contemporary novels. ...
... Further, Remi Raji's poetry has largely been an object of literary criticism and literary stylistics. Notable among the critics are Egya (2007Egya ( , 2011 and Adegoju (2013). While these studies have made shrewd interpretations of the stylistic and thematic aspects they investigated, none has addressed the transitivity patterns employed by the author to encode his meanings and convey the ideologies in his poetry. ...
... This they have done through the different waves of feminism movements across the globe. Over the years, African women seem "to have shifted [their] focus from the plight of the servile housewife or the peasant woman to the engagements, whether restricted or not, of the professional woman in her (urban) society" (Sule, 2011). The paradox remains that, while women across the globe ginger-up energy to confront gender inequality, there still remains to a large extent instances whereby women act as navigators of their own gender discrimination. ...
... Contemporarily -and by this I mean the last ten years -many studies have engaged queerness in Nigeria [17,18]. While some of these studies toe the line of the traditional by moralising against queer identities [19], many of the studies have indeed drawn attention to the plight of the Nigerian gay and lesbian community [20][21][22]. ...