Stewart L. Adelson's research while affiliated with Weill Cornell Medical College and other places

Publications (17)

Article
To better understand the relationship between faith and LGBTQ+ identity, we conducted a qualitative analysis of 86 respondents to a general question posed through the Dear Abby column. Responses were anonymized and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Analysis revealed six themes, reflecting a diversity of lived experience from community reje...
Article
As a socially marginalized group, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youths experience elevated rates of physical and mental health problems that are leading causes of mortality due to a variety of factors. Minority stress theory links exposure to stigma with health outcome disparities. Structural stigma including biased laws, policies,...
Article
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youths comprise a diverse population with unique developmental experiences and needs. Many experience some form of anti-LGBT stigma. Although most LGBT youths cope well and are free from mental illness, they are at increased risk for a number of psychiatric and other health problems compared with the g...
Article
Religion and spirituality have been associated in many studies with an impact on mental and physical health. However, the relationship between religious faith and transgender identities is not well studied. To understand this relationship, the LGBT Committee of the Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry undertook a qualitative analysis. Participan...
Article
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth have unique medical and mental health needs. Exposure to stigma such as family non-acceptance is associated with adverse mental health outcomes that are important sources of morbidity and mortality in this population. These include depression, anxiety, substance abuse, suicidality, and risk behav...
Article
Assessing, monitoring, and supporting children and adolescents' mental health are integral parts of comprehensive pediatric primary care. These are especially relevant for LGBT youth, who frequently experience unique stressors, often including having an identity different from family and peer expectations, whether to reveal it, and stigma like peer...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract While there is consensus that bipolar disorder exists in children and adolescents, its diagnostic criteria are debated. Excessive sexual behavior has been reported in youth who may have juvenile bipolar disorder (JBD), and has been termed "hypersexuality." Although there is no universal definition of this term, this observation has led to...
Article
Full-text available
Children and adolescents who are growing up gay, lesbian, bisexual, gender nonconforming, or gender discordant experience unique developmental challenges. They are at risk for certain mental health problems, many of which are significantly correlated with stigma and prejudice. Mental health professionals have an important role to play in fostering...
Article
Full-text available
Recent psychiatric literature has used the term "hypersexuality" to denote pathologically increased sexual behavior in children and adolescents. Various patterns of increased sexuality have been described in youth, including sexuality that is excessive, developmentally precocious, compulsive, aggressive, or otherwise socially inappropriate. Such "h...
Article
The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) is preparing a publication, Practice Parameter on Gay, Lesbian or Bisexual Sexual Orientation, Gender-Nonconformity, and Gender Discordance in Children and Adolescents. This article discusses the development of the part of the parameter related to gender nonconformity and gender discor...
Article
It has recently become evident that bipolar disorder exists in children and adolescents. The criteria for making the diagnosis of juvenile bipolar disorder (JBD) are in the process of being proposed for the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-V). In adults, a criterion for bipolar disorder is excessive involvement in pleasur...

Citations

... Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, and 2-spirit (LGBTQ2S+) youth and young adults are more likely to experience mental health problems, suicidality, and substance use problems in comparison to their heterosexual counterparts [1]. Global studies have shown that discrimination, stigma, and minority stress contribute towards this heightened risk [2][3][4][5][6][7]. Shared experiences such as social exclusion, violence, and peer bullying were found across a wide berth of studies on this population [2][3][4][5][6][7]. ...
... As a socially marginalized group, queer youth report disproportionate negative suicidality outcomes compared to their heterosexual and cisgender counterparts [12,13]. The 2019 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) shows that 44-47% of queer youth (i.e., gay, lesbian, or bisexual youth per their collected demographics) seriously considered suicide in the past year, compared to 15% of their heterosexual/cisgender peers [14,15]. ...
... A colaboração e articulação próxima entre pedopsiquiatras, pediatras, cuidados de saúde primários, psicólogos, assistentes sociais e outros profissionais de saúde ou técnicos é um elemento-chave para providenciar cuidados de saúde de qualidade aos jovens LGBTI+, que respondam às suas necessidades específicas (Lothwell et al., 2020). ...
... Little is known about how gender incongruent persons negotiate the potentially conflicting identities of gender non-conforming and Christian, and most research has been done in the USA (Ghazzawi et al., 2020). In a study of five Transgender and Gender Nonconforming (TGNC) people (Levy & Lo, 2013), the authors described a process involving five stages leading to resolution of conflict between gender identity and religious belief: experiencing gender socialization; having conflicts between views of self and socialized gender; defying gender norms; exploring gender and religious identities; and continually resolving issues as they arise. ...
... Stigma is recognized as a primary cause of mental and physical health disparities and is one of the most frequently discussed risk factors in elucidating mental health inequalities (Hatzenbuehler, 2017). Stigmatization, such as family rejection, exposes LGBTQ+ youth to the risk of negative mental health outcomes that lead to morbidity and mortality among this community (Adelson et al., 2019). ...
... Significant stigma, violence, mental health disorders, elevated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), sexually transmitted infections (STI), and comorbidities that are indicators of suboptimal health care have been well documented among transgender persons in general, and among transgender women of color (TWC) in particular (Adelson, Dowshen, Makadon, & Garofalo, 2016;Ayala & Ibanez, 2017;Baral et al., 2013;Bradford, Reisner, Honnold, & Xavier, 2013;Brennan et al., 2012;Bry, Mustanski, Garofalo, & Burns, 2018;Cicero, Reisner, Silva, Merwin, & Humphreys, 2019;Eaton, Kalichman, et al., 2017;Eaton, Matthews, et al., 2017;Frank et al., 2019;Garofalo, Deleon, Osmer, Doll, & Harper, 2006;Jin et al., 2019;Kussin-Shoptaw, Fletcher, & Reback, 2017;MacCarthy et al., 2017;Poteat, Wirtz, & Reisner, 2019;Reisner et al., 2016;Siembida, Eaton, Maksut, Driffin, & Baldwin, 2016). TWC (for the purposes of this study, we considered TWC as transgender women who identify as African-American, Native American, Latina, Asian Pacific Islander, and/or mixed race/ethnicity) often experience compounded risks to health care that may result from prejudices associated with gender identity, poverty, racism, and heterosexism and often result in structural barriers to care (Adelson et al., 2016;Eaton, Kalichman, et al., 2017;Eaton, Matthews, et al., 2017;Nuttbrock, 2012;Nuttbrock et al., 2014). ...
... One of the most important elements of paediatric primary care includes assessing and supporting youth's mental health (Adelson et al., 2016;Hafeez et al., 2017). This is particularly significant for LGBTQ+ youth, who are prone to experiencing unique stressors associated with family rejection, disclosure, victimization, self-nonacceptance, and stigmatization (Samaroo, 2017). ...
... Individual/informal barriers to care include self-stigma and minority stress, which negatively impact the ability of transgender people to reach out for care. Minority stress refers to the protracted level of stress faced by members of stigmatized, minority populations, leading to the internalization of negative societal mores, shame, or fear of personal harm [3,4]. This may result in self-stigma, leading to denial or concealment of one's identity in medical settings. ...
... Furthermore, Niehaus, Jackson, andDavies (2010) found that there is a growing body of literature that demonstrates that CSA interferes with the development of sexuality. Hypersexuality is defined as pathological sexual behavior that is both repeated and a high risk (Adelson et al., 2012). This may be a result of traumatic sexualization which is the distorted sexuality of a CSA survivor resulting from the sexual abuse (Collin-Vezina, Daigneault, & Hebert, 2013). ...
... Previous research also shows that the HCL has good sensitivity and specificity for identifying BD (Forty et al., 2010). In the present study the hypersexuality/flirtatious item from the HCL-16 was removed for concerns of offending this longitudinal sample, which is unfortunate given that this symptom can help distinguish pediatric BD from other conditions, such as ADHD (Adelson et al., 2013). Future studies replicating the findings here should aim to use the full version of the HCL-16. ...