Steven R. David's research while affiliated with Johns Hopkins University and other places

Publications (3)

Article
Stein and I see targeted killing in fundamentally different ways. Stein sees the Palestinian terrorists as civilian noncombatants who are not engaged in war or even armed conflict with Israel. As such, there is no legal or moral right to target them. I see targeted killing as an appropriate response to an intolerable threat. Israel has the right an...
Article
Since the beginning of the second intifada in the fall of 2000, Israel has pursued a policy in which alleged Palestinian terrorists have been hunted down and killed by government order. The policy is not one of assassination and is consistent with international law because Israel is engaged in armed conflict with terrorists, those targeted are usua...

Citations

... By arguing that assassination is not permissible even if it the targets are justified and the effects positive, Stein prevents an opponent from countering with a utilitarian or virtue-based argument. In his response, David issues the counter argument that individuals who engage in terrorism cannot be considered civilians and so are legitimate targets (David 2003a). This rebuttal is loosely virtue based because it is rooted in the character of the people being targeted. ...
... Without being able to clearly see who the enemy is (by virtue of a flag on their shoulder or a combat dress that is clearly recognizable), it becomes necessary to identify them individually and compile a list of all known enemy combatants, and using this list, target them; hence, "targeted killing". 11 Targeted 5 See David (2003) for a refreshingly balanced and reflective examination of targeted killing, with all its potential dangers and advantages. 6 Hunter (2009), p. 7. 7 Hunter (2009), p. 3. 8 Hunter (2009 Art. ...