Steven L. Manley's research while affiliated with California Institute of Technology and other places

Publications (5)

Article
Radionuclides of the micronutrients (Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, Mo, and I) of Macrocystis pyrifera (L.) C. Ag. and the nonnutrient Ni were concentrated in sieve tube sap. Micronutrient uptake rates of mature blade tissue were determined using the appropriate radionuclide in artificial seawater. Cellular uptake was distinguished from free space uptake by the u...
Article
Parameters of iron uptake have been determined for blade tissue of Macrocystis pyrifera (L.) C. Ag. These include the effects of iron concentration, light, various inhibitors, and blade type. All experiments were conducted in the defined artificial seawater Aquil. Iron uptake is light independent, energy dependent, and dependent on the reduction fr...
Article
Cell-free fractions from Odonthalia floccosa incubated with 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde-[U-14C], 3-bromo-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde-[U-14C] and 82Br− formed the dibromo-dihydroxybenzaldehyde derivatives of the bromophenols (brominated benzylalcohols) which were also identified as naturally occurring products.
Article
The biosynthesis of 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and 3-bromo-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde from l-[U-(14)C]tyrosine has been demonstrated in chloroplast-containing fractions obtained by differential and isopycnic centrifugation from the marine red alga Odonthalia floccosa. Surfactant and high speed centrifugation studies indicate that the biosynthetic pathway inv...

Citations

... C-3′ and δC 143.33, C-4′) was not possible from HMBC correlations, since there are no protons in the molecular vicinity. Based on the substitution of the 2′',3′'-dibromo-4′',5′'-dihydroxybenzyl moiety and since p-hydroxybenzaldehyde is the biogenetic origin of the lanosol scaffold [23], we propose the reported assignments (see Table 2) and, therefore, the structure of 15 to be 3-(6′-lanosyl lanosyl)-tyrosine. The structures of compounds 10-15 are given in Figure 3. , which corresponds to vertebratol [6]. ...
... The content of iodine in wild-harvested M. pyrifera might be of concern in relation to the maximum tolerable iodine level of 1000 mg kg − 1 DW currently set in Australia for algal food [76]. However, these data are similar to those reported previously for M. pyrifera [33,77,78] and are lower than those reported for other seaweeds that are already commonly commercialised (e.g. Laminaria sp., [79]), showing a potential of the species investigated as an alternative and safer food product to some seaweeds already commercialised (e.g. ...
... The all bars indicate ±SD (three replications) Lenormandia prolifera (Hofsen et al. 1977) and Odonthalia dentata (Hofsen and Pedersén 1980) using X-ray microanalysis. In addition, BPO activity was detected in chloroplast fraction prepared from the red alga O. floccosa (Manley and Chapman 1979). In the present study (Fig. 6), we found that P. yezoensis sporophytes accumulated bromide and BPO proteins within the chloroplasts. ...
... When seaweed extract was applied to growth substrates, it was reported to enhance soil conditions, with the alginic acid action targeted at stimulating the bacterial decomposition of organic material (Zodape 2001). Soluble alginates from seaweed are known to act as an aggregation facilitator between soil particles, thus resulting in increased nutrient uptake (Manley 1981;Verkleij 1992). ...