Steven J. Cooke's research while affiliated with Carleton University and other places

Publications (41)

Article
The study of the stress response and subsequent recovery of angled fish can inform the development of best practices for catch-and-release (C&R) angling. While large bodies of research exist detailing the impacts of C&R during warm periods of the year (i.e., open water), relatively few studies have been conducted during the colder months when sub-f...
Article
Fish passage science and practice seeks to facilitate the movement of fish around obstacles in their habitat, primarily through the construction of fishways and culverts. Successful implementation of fish passage requires collaboration between groups with very different backgrounds and expertise, including knowledge-producers (scientists who study...
Article
Full-text available
Animals need to move between different habitats to successfully complete their life cycle. Anthropogenic activities and infrastructure impact animal movement, especially in the aquatic realm, due to habitat alteration (including fragmentation), pollution, overexploitation, the spread of invasive alien species and climate change. Gaining knowledge o...
Article
Nearshore fish communities in marine flats ecosystems are recognised as being key for early life stages of socio-economically valued fish species, as well as small-bodied forage fishes, yet little is known about the spatial ecology of these fishes. Recent advances in acoustic telemetry have allowed for the tagging of small fish. Here, we used the s...
Chapter
Marine and freshwater fisheries are more important than ever for sustaining human populations but are also facing unprecedented threats from the combined effects of multiple environmental stressors. Here we review how the rapidly changing abiotic environment of fish may affect interactions between fish and fishers, at both the individual and popula...
Article
Foresight science is a systematic approach to generate future predictions for planning and management by drawing upon analytical and predictive tools to understand the past and present, while providing insights about the future. To illustrate the application of foresight science in conservation, we present three case studies: identification of emer...
Article
Total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation from sources such as hydroelectric dams can cause harmful bubble growth in the tissues of aquatic animals, known as gas bubble trauma (GBT). Locomotion is known to exacerbate bubble growth in tissues during decompression under certain conditions (such as in diving animals), possibly because of increased bub...
Article
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Animals that congregate in large numbers to reproduce in spatially and temporally distinct locations are particularly susceptible to overexploitation. Many fishes form spawning aggregations that are intentionally targeted given ease of capture. Bonefish (Albula spp.) species aggregate to spawn and are culturally and economically important, but gene...
Article
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Differences in individual personality are common amongst animals, which can play an ecological and evolutionary role given links to fitness. Personality affects animal life processes and outputs (e.g., behavior, life history, growth, survival, reproduction), and has become a common theme in animal behavioral ecology research. In the present study,...
Article
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Freshwater ecosystems are among the most degraded on the planet and there is strong evidence that freshwater biodiversity is in precipitous decline. To that end, there is urgent need to conserve and restore freshwater ecosystems and biodiversity in order to ensure that freshwaters continue to yield diverse ecosystem services. Although there is some...
Chapter
It is widely regarded that we have entered a new epoch distinct from the Holocene which is defined by the dominance of humans—termed the “Anthropocene.” Indeed, for centuries humans have altered aquatic ecosystems by degrading habitats, altering ecosystem structure, and impairing ecosystem function. In the Anthropocene, aquatic ecosystems and their...
Article
“Natural” disasters (also known as geophysical disasters) involve physical processes that have a direct or indirect impact on humans. These events occur rapidly and may have severe consequences for resident flora and fauna as their habitat undergoes dramatic and sudden change. Although most studies have focused on the impact of natural disasters on...
Chapter
Energy is a fundamental currency of life that can be quantified in organisms to understand how environmental conditions and anthropogenic stressors affect individuals, scaling up to populations and entire ecosystems. Bioenergetics studies have been conducted extensively on fishes, with an historical focus on lab-based experiments relevant to fisher...
Article
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Permit (Trachinotus falcatus) occupy a variety of coastal marine habitats and support valuable recreational fisheries in their home region of the Caribbean Sea. As an aggregate spawning species, Permit require careful management in locations such as the Florida Keys where they experience substantial fishing pressure. We used acoustic telemetry to e...
Article
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Purpose of Review Multiple stressor studies conducted in real-world environments play an important role in discovering how stressor pathways may vary relative to ecological complexity and study scale. We reviewed the evidence for climate and landscape change impacts on freshwater biodiversity in real-world ecosystems at the global scale. Using our...
Article
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Tropical and subtropical coastal flats are shallow regions of the marine environment at the intersection of land and sea. These regions provide myriad ecological goods and services, including recreational fisheries focused on flats-inhabiting fishes such as bonefish, tarpon, and permit. The cascading effects of climate change have the potential to...
Article
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The Society for Ecological Restoration (SER) published the second edition of its International Principles and Standards for the Practice of Ecological Restoration in 2019. We conducted a pan‐Canadian study using semi‐structured interviews with restoration professionals to explore the extent to which restoration practitioners are aware of the docume...
Article
The construction of dams and weirs has fragmented many rivers and streams globally, and this is a major threat to biodiversity. The most common method used to reduce these impacts is to construct fishways. Published examples show that while fishways can be effective, their performance can also be highly variable. Given this variability, it is criti...
Article
While a growing body of literature has shown that tourism provisioning can influence the behaviour of wildlife, how physiological state might be related to the nature and magnitude of these effects remains poorly understood. Physiological state, including reproductive and nutritional status, can have profound effects on an individual's behaviour an...
Article
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This study investigated the potential effects of red tide events (blooms of the toxin-producing dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis) on Atlantic tarpon (Megalops atlanticus), a long-lived migratory game fish, along the southwestern coast of Florida. In this region, red tides have long been associated with mass mortality events of marine organisms and ot...
Poster
Biodiversity surveys can be substantially improved through the analysis of environmental DNA (eDNA) if appropriate DNA sequence reference databases exist. Here, we aimed to assess the availability of molecular genetic resources for Canada’s freshwater-dependent species and identify data deficiencies where future research should be directed. The mai...
Article
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Globally, ecosystems have suffered from anthropogenic stressors as we enter the sixth mass extinction within the Anthropocene. In response, the UN has declared 2020–2030 the Decade for Ecosystem Restoration, aiming to mitigate ecosystem degradation and biodiversity loss. Freshwater ecosystems are disproportionately impacted relative to marine or te...
Article
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Finding ways of efficiently monitoring threatened species can be critical to effective conservation. The global proliferation of community science (also called citizen science) programs, like iNaturalist, presents a potential alternative or complement to conventional threatened species monitoring. Using a case study of ~700,000 observations of >10,...
Article
Full-text available
Bonefish (Albula spp.) have ecological, economic, and cultural importance throughout their tropical and subtropical range. These fish reside primarily in shallow, nearshore habitats, and their movement patterns are largely dominated by tidal flows, thermal regime, and seasonal spawning migrations. Previous studies of their spatial ecology show that...
Article
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In nearly every ecosystem, human predators (hunters and fishers) exploit animals at extraordinarily high rates, as well as target different age classes and phenotypes, compared to other apex predators. Demographically decoupled from prey populations and technologically advanced, humans now impose widespread and significant ecological and evolutiona...
Article
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Post‐exercise mortality (PEM) may occur when fish exercise to exhaustion and are pushed so far beyond their physiological limits that they can no longer sustain life. Although fish exercise to overcome a variety of natural challenges, the phenomenon of PEM is most often observed as the result of interactions between fish and humans. The seminal wor...
Article
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In response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic there has been an increased need for personal and environmental decontamination to aid in curbing transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Products used for this purpose include sanitizers for hands and disinfectants for surfaces. The active chemical ingredients used in these products, termed antimicr...
Preprint
Differences in individual personality are common amongst animals, which can play an ecological and evolutionary role given links to fitness. Personality affects animal life processes and outputs (e.g., behavior, life history, growth, survival, reproduction), and has become a common theme in animal behavioral ecology research. In the present study,...
Article
Movement of fishes in the aquatic realm is fundamental to their ecology and survival. Movement can be driven by a variety of biological, physiological, and environmental factors occurring across all spatial and temporal scales. The intrinsic capacity of movement to impact fish individually (e.g., foraging) with potential knock‐on effects throughout...
Article
Full-text available
A seminal report by Peter H. Pearse (1988; Rising to the Challenge: A New Policy for Canadas Freshwater Fisheries, Canadian Wildlife Federation, Ottawa) outlined 62 policy recommendations focused on the management of Canadas inland fisheries. Over three decades later, freshwater ecosystems and inland fisheries in Canada are still facing similar cha...
Article
Full-text available
Fish exposed to supersaturated total dissolved gas (TDG) levels can develop gas bubble trauma (GBT) which can lead to sublethal effects or mortality. Access to refugia in areas of high TDG that allows for hydrostatic (depth) compensation can mitigate exposure risk and GBT occurrence. The goals for this study were to examine resident fish habitat an...
Article
We quantified effects of wind speed and sunlight on Smallmouth Bass (Micropterus dolomieu), a popular gamefish in North America, after catch‐and‐release (C&R) (n = 90) during August for various periods (0, 10, 30 and 90 s) in direct sunlight or shaded from direct sunlight. We evaluated change in skin temperature and reflex action mortality predicto...
Article
Telemetry has major potential for application to fish habitat science and management, but to date it is underutilized in this regard. We posit this is because (1) fish telemetry projects are often geared towards detecting fish movement, opposed to systematically sampling habitat selection, and (2) there are often differences in scale between teleme...
Article
Hypoxia in surface waters driven by warming climate and other anthropogenic stressors is a major conservation concern and technological solutions for water quality remediation are sorely needed. One potential solution involves the use of low‐intensity electromagnetic fields (EMFs) to increase dissolved oxygen levels but potential collateral effects...
Article
Full-text available
Early definitions of conservation focused largely on the end goals of protection or restoration of nature, and the various disciplinary domains that contribute to these ends. Conservation science and practice has evolved beyond being focused on just issues of scarcity and biodiversity decline. To better recognize the inherent links between human be...
Article
Life in the Anthropocene is characterized by many environmental problems, and unfortunately, more continue to emerge. Although much effort is focused on identifying problems, this does not necessarily translate to solutions. This situation extends to the training environment, where students are often adept at understanding and dissecting problems b...

Citations

... Environments are not static but dynamic, and conditions vary in space and time (see Chapter 4, Volume 39B: Killen et al., 2022;Chapter 5, Volume 39B: Luis Val et al., 2022;Chapter 7, Volume 39B: Rummer and Illing, 2022; Chapter 8, Volume 39B: Strailey and Suski, 2022). Changing climates are often discussed in terms of averages, but extreme events, including increased variation in environmental factors, are already becoming common and are predicted to become further exacerbated in the future (IPCC, 2021). ...
... The recent IPCC projections (IPCC, 2021) and perilous state of freshwater fish (aka the world's forgotten fishes; WWF, 2021) are sounding alarm bells for fish physiologists and conservation biologists around the globe. Our aquatic systems are in trouble (see Chapter 1, Volume 39A: Cooke et al., 2022), but cardiorespiratory physiology techniques can help identify underlying mechanisms, tolerance thresholds, and population vulnerability to further environmental degradation. Evidence suggests that conservation science is most useful for decision-making when it is co-produced by researchers and practitioners (Baker et al., 2020;Cooke et al., 2021). ...
... With the need to build more capacity across restoration practitioners and organisations, the United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration, launched in collaboration with the FAO, represents a unique opportunity to bring together and bring into the mainstream the various restoration pathways and objectives in a coordinated manner, as well as to massively scale up restoration projects across the globe [65]. With restoration principles and guidelines becoming more available and applied [8,[66][67][68], there is an opportunity to bridge the gaps between restoration science and the policy agenda and develop a shared vision of ecosystem restoration. As the discipline of restoration is evolving rapidly, policymakers, in Canada or elsewhere, are in a unique position to develop sciencebased and flexible policies that account for the full set of ecosystem restoration objectives and values and that strengthen the capacity for practitioners and scientists to respond to ongoing and future changes [59,62]. ...
... We also indicated the need to build long-term trust with stakeholders and rights holders and encourage transdisciplinary approaches within management to achieve transformative action. This requires providing change-makers (e.g., NGO partners, community groups, policy makers) with solutions-oriented, measurable, actionable, and timely research (Sherman 2011;Chapman et al. 2015;Dlouhá et al. 2019) and ensuring that researchers are equipped with the mindset to do this work (Gale et al. 2021). There has been an increasing focus on how to achieve impact at the interface between science and policy (Cvitanovic et al. 2021b;Karcher et al. 2021). ...
... Their observations may be based on a broader seasonal and historical range than other fisheries science methodologies such as scientific surveys or tagging programs [5]. Therefore, FHK can fill gaps in historical data [3], support and expand on parallel studies with more conventional scientific methods [11,24,51], and reveal discrepancies between fish harvesters' understanding and fisheries assessment reports that may be affecting the efficiency of management or conservation measures [8,16]. FHK of the various fisheries and other industries in their region can also help to identify spatiotemporal overlaps with essential habitats of target species, and the potential impacts associated with those overlaps [36], such as bycatch, disruption of spawning, habitat damage, or pollution. ...
... Similarly, physiological investigations into the migrations of diadromous fishes often provide insight into the metabolic, hormonal, or other physiological drivers affecting the onset, timing, and success of these movements, which have populationwide implications (Birnie-Gauvin et al. 2019;Hertz et al. 2019). The physiological state of organisms may also explain conspecific space use differences, as demonstrated by Rangel et al. (2022) when exploring the time tiger sharks (Galeocerdo Cuvier) spent at tourism provisioning sites in the Bahamas. Finally, important gains can be made towards understanding fish movements using physiology as researchers pair novel tools with animal tracking such as transcriptomics (and other 'omics') to assess physiological states of fishes (Jeffries et al. 2021). ...
... Predators, through patchy indirect effects, have irreplaceable ecological roles within ecosystems that clearly facilitate landscape heterogeneity, nutrient cycling, and myriad other important processes affecting ecosystem dynamics . Predators' ability to create patchy landscapes through localized pathways adds to the growing evidence that they affect ecosystem structure and function in ways that are not easily replicated by humans (Lennox et al. 2022). ...
... For azamethiphos, though data is sparse, all algae and bacteria endpoints are found at the top of the SSD curve (i.e. they were among the least sensitive species). Conversely for hydrogen peroxide, microorganisms are amongst the most sensitive (with some recent data on crustaceans), and this is likely explained by the antimicrobial mechanisms of action of this pesticide(PMRA 2013(PMRA , 2014Marteinson et al 2022).Ideally, taxonomic groups to be included in an SSD should be carefully selected because the composition of the species assemblage may have a significant influence on the assessment of hazards(Duboudin et al. 2004). For example, non-random selection of laboratory test species often causes a particular taxonomic group to be over-represented(Forbes and Calow 2002), such as crustaceans in our ...
... Discussion. Movement is a fundamental aspect of the life history and ecology of fishes (Cooke et al. 2022). Temporal and spatial scales of movement can vary from diel movements between foraging and resting areas; transitions to different regions during ontogeny; and annual migrations between spawning, foraging, and wintering areas. ...
... Phone apps -In Alberta a popular fishing app is being used by Alberta Environment and Parks to obtain information on fishing effort, catch and harvest (Papenfuss et al., 2015) Artificial intelligence -Artificial intelligence is being used to automate extraction of data from videos related to fish passage at a variety of facilities including for Pacific salmon in the Pacific northwest providing managers with real time information on run timing and abundance (https://www.newsdata.com/water_power_west/hydro_news/scanners-installed-at-bonneville-dam-to-helpautomate-fish-counts/article_ff98ff96-b3b9-11e9-82dc-13510db565ff.html) fisheries management may have changed over the last 30 years, as have opportunities for change, there is little evidence of widespread change in fisheries management systems (Piczak et al., 2022). In the marine realm, there have been a number of attempts to consider how technology can contribute to sustainable fisheries (see Caddy, 1999;Standal, 2005), yet many of those ideas have yet to be fully realized. ...