Stephanie von Hinke's research while affiliated with Erasmus University Rotterdam and other places

Publications (32)

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British children have the highest levels of ultra-processed food (UPF) consumption in Europe. Schools are posited as a positive setting for impacting dietary intake, but the level of UPFs consumed in schools is currently unknown. This study determined the UPF content of school food in the UK. We conducted a pooled cross-sectional analysis of primar...
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Objective School lunches represent a key opportunity to improve diets and health of schoolchildren. No recent nationally representative studies have examined the nutritional differences between school meals and packed lunches in the UK. This study aimed to characterise and compare the nutritional quality of school meals and packed lunches among pri...
Preprint
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Adverse conditions in early life can have consequential impacts on individuals' health in older age. In one of the first papers on this topic, Barker and Osmond 1986 show a strong positive relationship between infant mortality rates in the 1920s and ischaemic heart disease in the 1970s. We go 'beyond Barker', first by showing that this relationship...
Preprint
Polygenic indices (PGIs) are increasingly used to identify individuals at high risk of developing diseases and disorders and are advocated as a screening tool for personalised intervention in medicine and education. The performance of PGIs is typically assessed in terms of the amount of phenotypic variance they explain in independent prediction sam...
Article
The Universal Infant Free School Meal (UIFSM) policy was introduced in September 2014 in England and January 2015 in Scotland and offered all infant schoolchildren (ages 4-7 years) a free school lunch, regardless of income. Yet, impacts of UIFSM on dietary intakes or social inequalities are not known. A difference-in-differences study using the Nat...
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Research at the intersection of social science and genomics, ‘sociogenomics’, is transforming our understanding of the interplay between genomics, individual outcomes and society. It has interesting and maybe unexpected implications for education research and policy. Here we review the growing sociogenomics literature and discuss its implications f...
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Nature (one's genes) and nurture (one's environment) jointly contribute to the formation and evolution of health and human capital over the life cycle. This complex interplay between genes and environment can be estimated and quantified using genetic information readily available in a growing number of social science data sets. To help the novice r...
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Economists and social scientists have debated the relative importance of nature (one's genes) and nurture (one's environment) for decades, if not centuries. This debate can now be informed by the ready availability of genetic data in a growing number of social science datasets. This paper explores the potential uses of genetic data in economics, wi...
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This paper uses a large UK cohort to investigate the impact of early-life pollution exposure on individuals' human capital and health outcomes in older age. We compare individuals who were exposed to the London smog in December 1952 whilst in utero or in infancy to those born after the smog and those born at the same time but in unaffected areas. W...
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Background Healthy Start is a food assistance programme in the United Kingdom (UK) which aims to provide a nutritional safety-net and enable low-income families on welfare benefits to access a healthier diet through the provision of food vouchers. Healthy Start was launched in 2006 but remains under-evaluated. This study aims to determine whether p...
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This paper examines the relationship between education and health behaviours, focusing on potential offsetting responses between calories in (i.e. dietary intakes) and calories out (i.e. physical activity). It exploits the 1972 British compulsory schooling law that raised the minimum school leaving age from 15 to 16 to estimate the effects of educa...
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The use of planning policy to manage and create a healthy food environment has become a popular policy tool for local governments in England. To date there has been no evaluation of their short-term impact on the built environment. We assess if planning guidance restricting new fast food outlets within 400 m of a secondary school, influences the fo...
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Background and purpose Neighbourhood exposure to takeaway (‘fast’-) food outlets selling different cuisines may be differentially associated with diet, obesity and related disease, and contributing to population health inequalities. However research studies have not disaggregated takeaways by cuisine type. This is partly due to the substantial reso...
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Excessive alcohol use is associated with a wide range of adverse outcomes that inflict large societal costs. This paper investigates the impacts of increases in regulated opening hours of Swedish alcohol retailers on alcohol purchases, health and crime outcomes by relating changes in these outcomes in municipalities that increased their retail open...
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Polygenic scores have become the workhorse for empirical analyses in social-science genetics. Because a polygenic score is constructed using the results of finite-sample Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWASs), it is a noisy approximation of the true latent genetic predisposition to a certain trait. The conventional way of boosting the predictive p...
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The birth order literature emphasizes the role of parental investments in explaining why firstborns have higher human capital outcomes than their laterborn siblings. We use birth order as a proxy for investments and interact it with genetic endowments. Exploiting only within-family variation in both ensures they are exogenous as well as orthogonal...
Preprint
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Introduction Healthy Start is a food assistance programme in the United Kingdom (UK) which aims to enable low-income families on welfare benefits to access a healthier diet through the provision of food vouchers. Healthy Start was launched in 2006 but remains under-evaluated. This study aims to determine whether participation in the Healthy Start s...
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Background: The study aimed to evaluate the validity and spatial accuracy of the Food Standards Agency Food Hygiene Rating online data through a field audit. Methods: A field audit was conducted in five Lower Layer Super Output Areas (LSOAs) in the North East of England. LSOAs were purposively selected from the top and bottom quintiles of the In...
Article
Background The Healthy Start programme is a statutory benefit-in-kind in the United Kingdom (UK) which aims to enable low-income families to purchase fruit, vegetables, cow's milk and infant formula through the provision of vouchers. The scheme was introduced in 2006, however, the effect on food purchasing in participating households has not been e...
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This paper evaluates a UK policy that aimed to improve dietary information provision by introducing nutrition labelling on retailers’ store-brand products. Exploiting the differential timing of the introduction of Front-of-Pack nutrition labels as a quasi-experiment, our findings suggest that labelling led to a reduction in the quantity purchased o...
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Background: Systematic reviews of prenatal alcohol exposure effects generally only include conventional observational studies. However, estimates from such studies are prone to confounding and other biases. Objectives: To systematically review the evidence on the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and o...
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There is growing policy interest in encouraging better dietary choices. We study a nationally-implemented policy - the UK Healthy Start scheme - that introduced vouchers for fruit, vegetables and milk. We show that the policy has increased spending on fruit and vegetables and has been more effective than an equivalent-value cash benefit. We also sh...
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There has been much interest recently in the relationship between economic conditions and mortality, with some studies showing that mortality is pro-cyclical, while others find the opposite. Some suggest that the aggregation level of analysis (e.g. individual vs. regional) matters. We use both individual and aggregated data on a sample of 20-64 yea...
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Whether and how changes in economic circumstances or household income affect individuals’ diet and nutritional intakes is of substantial interest for policy purposes. This paper exploits a period of substantial income volatility in Russia to examine the extent to which, as well as how individuals protect their energy intakes in the face of unantici...
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Accurate measurement of the marginal healthcare costs associated with different diseases and health conditions is important, especially for increasingly prevalent conditions such as obesity. However, existing observational study designs cannot identify the causal impact of disease on healthcare costs. This paper explores the possibilities for causa...

Citations

... On average, school meals have been shown to have a preferable nutritional profile compared to packed lunches (food brought from home) [19][20][21][22]. However, concerns have been raised about the quality of school meals, which although preferable to packed lunches, are not yet optimal [23,24]. Furthermore, there has been little research examining the extent to which school meals or packed lunches include UPFs. ...
... Using the same dataset (HRS), however, Lin (2020) finds that the predictive power of the educational attainment polygenic index has increased (rather than decreased) for younger cohorts (born in 1942-1959) compared to older cohorts (born in 1920-1941). This inconsistency might be explained by the fact that Lin (2020) Finally, characterizing individuals' early life circumstances by the infant mortality rate in one's year and local geographic area of birth, Baker et al. (2022) start by replicating a seminal paper by Barker and Osmond (1986), showing a strong positive relationship between infant mortality rate at birth and ischaemic heart disease in later life. In addition to exploring whether this relationship holds within local geographic areas and within families, they explore whether the positive association conceals underlying genetic heterogeneity, using one's PGI for heart disease. ...
... On average, school meals have been shown to have a preferable nutritional profile compared to packed lunches (food brought from home) [19][20][21][22]. However, concerns have been raised about the quality of school meals, which although preferable to packed lunches, are not yet optimal [23,24]. Furthermore, there has been little research examining the extent to which school meals or packed lunches include UPFs. ...
... Indeed, most studies that explore the effects of early-life pollution exposure investigate the immediate effects on child birth outcomes (see e.g., Chay and Greenstone, 2003;Currie and Neidell, 2005;Almond et al., 2009;Currie, 2009;Jayachandran, 2009;Currie and Walker, 2011;Knittel et al., 2016;Sanders and Stoecker, 2015;Arceo et al., 2016;Hanlon, 2018;Jia and Ku, 2019;Rangel and Vogl, 2019), with only few exploring potential effects in childhood or early adulthood (see e.g., Reyes, 2007;Bharadwaj et al., 2017;Almond et al., 2009;Sanders, 2012;Black et al., 2013;Isen et al., 2017) and even fewer focusing on outcomes in older age (Bharadwaj et al., 2016;Ball, 2018a). As such, ignoring potential long-term effects 1 For example, research has explored the importance of maternal physical health (Behrman and Rosenzweig, 2004;Almond, 2006;Almond and Mazumder, 2005), maternal mental health (von Hinke et al., 2019), maternal health behaviours (Nilsson, 2017;von Hinke et al., 2014), maternal nutrition (van den Berg et al., 2021), the economic environment (Van den Berg et al., 2006;Banerjee et al., 2010), the early life health environment (Bleakley, 2007;Case and Paxson, 2009;Cattan et al., 2021), or the home environment (Carneiro et al., 2015). of pollution may lead to a substantial underestimation of the total welfare effects caused by exposure to environmental toxins. ...
... The studies described above are summarized in Table 1. [29] Random forest technique Classification of normal, AMD and DME with SD-OCT images Acc: 97.33 for two classes case (DME and normal) Acc: 95.58 for three classes case (DME, AMD, and normal) DL models have generally been used to develop automatic classification methods [30][31][32]. The deep models have unique benefits and have achieved good results for computer vision problems. ...
... location and accessibility of food outlets outside the home) is less regulated than schools or workplaces, with few interventions conducted at the local governmental level (15). The evidence around "what works" to foster healthy food environments at the community level is still developing; however, some options include zoning ordinances and land-use plans which can influence placement and access to food outlets, as well as in-store policies aiming to improve access to healthy foods (46,47). ...
... Third, indirect genetic effects of parents may be stronger in singletons because of additional parental investment with fewer offspring. Similarly birth order may influence the magnitude of direct genetic effects and how an individual is affected by their parents [30,31]. However, differences in indirect genetic effects and birth order are unlikely to explain the observed differences in PGS associations for educational attainment. ...
... The food vouchers may have improved maternal nutrition more than Welfare Foods [7][8][9]. They may well promote fruit and vegetable consumption [10,11] although evidence is conflicting [12]. Additional 'vitamin vouchers' were exchanged for Government-commissioned children's drops (6-48 months: vitamins A, C, D) and pregnant and lactating women's tablets (folic acid; vitamins C, D). ...
... We applied our 10-point classifier to takeaway food outlet data for England, obtained from the Food Standards Agency (FSA) (Food Standards Agency, 2020b). These data, and their spatial accuracy and completeness, have been described in detail elsewhere (Kirkman et al., 2020). We wrote a Python script to collect data on 530,024 food outlets of all types in England from the FSA API in September 2019 (Food Standards Agency, 2020a). ...
... One of the main causes of this are poor dietary choices ( WHO, 2002Marmot, 2005. Governments across the world are trying to encourage individuals to make healthier choices, through channels such as information provision (e.g. the five-a-day campaign (Capacci and Mazzochi, 2011), food labelling (Fichera and von Hinke, 2020)) and fiscal measures (e.g. taxes (Fletcher, 2010), targeted benefits (Griffith, von Hinke and Smith, 2018)). ...