Stella C. Chia's research while affiliated with Nanyang Technological University and other places

Publications (10)

Article
This study examines the hostile media effect in relation to partisans’ perception of the slant of news coverage in a highly regulated press environment—Singapore. We found that partisans in Singapore perceived unbiased news to be in favor of the other side, while the nonpartisans perceived the same news to be neutral. Our findings show that hostile...
Article
This study examines how adolescents' involvement with entertainment celebrities mediates media effects on personal values and subjective well-being. A survey of 621 adolescents aged from 11 to 18 years old in Singapore showed that the three aspects of adolescents' involvement with celebrities—entertainment-social values, intense-personal feelings,...
Article
The term pluralistic ignorance refers to erroneous beliefs held by a group of individuals about the attitudes or behavior of others. In this study, we examined the degree to which college students in Singapore misconceive their peers’ sexual attitudes and behavior. The data for this study came from a web-based survey involving a random sample of 53...
Article
This study investigates the third-person effect in relation to body-image factors in Singapore. College women in Singapore reported that thinness ideals, as portrayed in magazine ads, had greater media effects on friends than on themselves. Their perception of media effects on themselves was positively associated with their intention to lose weight...
Article
In this study, I examine a model through which I attempt to identify how peers mediate media influences on adolescent sexuality. The data for this paper came from a paper-and-pencil survey involving 213 late adolescents who were between the ages of 18 and 19. The findings show that (a) adolescents attend to sex-related media and believe that their...
Article
More recently, many scholars have lamented the decline of social capital, civic and political participation in American society. This study attempts to clarify the concept of social capital and its major components. We differentiate two dimensions of social capital: trust and social connectedness. In addition, we investigate the differential effect...
Article
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This study1 examines the factors that affect the intention to adopt the internet among non-users against the backdrop of an emerging internet plateau. Using data from a telephone survey with a representative national sample of non-users in Singapore, this study attempts to understand better what may facilitate or impede non-users to adopt the inter...
Article
In this study we examined how media contribute to college students' erroneous perceptions of peer norms and the consequences of such misperceptions. The data came from a survey of 312 college students. Results indicate that students believed that their peers were significantly more sexually permissive than was actually the case. The data suggested...
Article
This study investigates the third-person perception and both preventive and punitive explanations for support for media censorship in the context of a controversial sexual video compact disc (VCD) that exposed the private sex life of a Taiwanese politician. The preventive explanation views support for censorship as a preventive action to protect ot...
Article
Full-text available
E-government in Singapore is an extensive venture that has been sanctioned by a series of policy initiatives and programs and is widely considered an exemplary effort. This national survey (n = 1,016) explored several key aspects of users and non-users of the Internet and government Websites in Singapore. The findings provide fresh evidence of the...

Citations

... The model also claims that audiences can develop a liking for certain celebrities through PSRs (Fraser and Brown, 2002;Wen, 2017). As a result of their PSRs, audiences may aspire to look, think or even behave like the celebrities they follow, which could further promote their identification with those celebrities (Chia and Poo, 2009;Fraser and Brown, 2002). ...
... So far, it has been shown that sociodemographic and socioeconomic background predict internet non-use. Generally, individuals from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds are consistently more likely to be non-users (e.g., Blank et al., 2019;Chia et al., 2006;DiMaggio et al., 2004;Dutton & Blank, 2013;Dutton & Reisdorf, 2019;Grishchenko, 2020;Scheerder et al., 2017;van Dijk, 2013;Zickuhr, 2013). Higher income and education level as well as lower age and positive attitudes towards the internet also appear to be stable predictors of internet use . ...
... However, media tend to be more heavily censored under non-democratic regimes (Egorov et al., 2009). Under authoritarian regimes, to control information flows that may threaten the social order, government authorities often censor sensitive content such as political scandals in media (Chia et al., 2004) and collective action potentials (King et al., 2013) via various methods such as Internet blocks, content removal, and online filtering systems. China is an often-cited example of pervasive censorship in which censorship is most heavily imposed on content aimed at arousing collective action against the state (King et al., 2013). ...
... Body image driven by exposure to Instagram Fitspiration images is underpinned by cognitive theories, such as social comparison, self-schema, and self-discrepancy (Ahadzadeh et al., 2017;Fatt et al., 2019;Kim & Chock, 2015;Rodgers et al., 2015;Tiggemann & Anderberg, 2019;Yu & Jung, 2018). The relevance of third-person effect (TPE) theory, where individuals perceive that the media content has a greater effect on others than on themselves (Davison, 1983), was documented in several studies elucidating the effect of idealized images in magazines on body image (Chia, 2007;Chia & Wen, 2010;David & Johnson, 1998). However, the application of TPE theory as the primary cause of body perception remains unknown among the viewers of Instagram Fitspiration images. ...
... Martens et al. (2005) and Scholly et al., (2005) substantiated the social norms approach and found that individuals in American colleges tend to overestimate the frequency of their peers' alcohol and drug use as well as the frequency of sexual activity and the number of sexual partners they have leading to an acceptance of casual sex or hook-ups. These incorrect beliefs of peer sexual norms are also influenced by students' perceptions of media and the influence of media on peers (Chia & Gunther, 2006). 77% of primetime television shows had sexual content, and young adults' perceptions of sexual conduct and conventions are shaped by media portrayals (Kunkel et al., 2005). ...
... Davis (1999) úgy vélte, hogy csakúgy, mint a televízió megjelenése, az internet megjelenése további demobilizációs erővel bír. A kutatások egy része abba az irányba terelte a diskurzust, hogy mivel az információ kereshetővé válik növelni fogja a politikai részvételt, míg mások arra jutottak, hogy a televízió és újság fogyasztáshoz képest az internet éppenséggel csökkenti azt (Zhang -Chia, 2006). A szakirodalomban egy rövid, reményteli időszakban az internet sorsfordító, demokráciát megváltó eszközként kezelték. ...
... These are three of the four official languages in Singapore, the fourth being Tamil. Based on past national surveys (e.g., Li et al., 2005;Rosenthal & Ho, 2020), there are few Tamil-speaking households and those households are generally comfortable using other languages. ...
... pp. 1−22, ISSN: en trámite been documented in several countries, including Singapore (Chia et al., 2007), Israel (Tsfati, 2007), South Korea (Choi et al., 2009), Colombia (Rojas, 2010); and Switzerland (Matthes, 2011). While the hostile media phenomenon grew out of work testing reactions to specific types of media content, it has been extended to generalized evaluations of media content (see for example Barnidge & Rojas 2014), especially in national contexts where media fragmentation is generally low and the concept of partisan media is not widely applicable. ...
... People's attitudinal responses have been examined in various studies (Chia, 2006;Gunther et al., 2006). Some scholars have indicated that peoples' perceptions of media influence on others regarding sexual issues (Chia, 2006) and smoking (Gunther et al., 2006) were positively associated with their attitudes towards sexual behaviors and smoking. ...
... Cross-sectional data suggest that exposure to sexual television content is related to viewers' sexual attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. Several studies have found that watching sexual television content is positively related to attitudes supportive of casual or recreational sex (e.g., Carpentier & Stevens, 2018;Chia & Lee, 2008;Ward & Friedman, 2006). In addition, studies have found that watching television was related to increased beliefs that their peers were sexually experienced (Ward, 2002;Ward & Rivadeneyra, 1999). ...