Stacey T. M. Cheung's research while affiliated with The University of Queensland and other places

Publications (18)

Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic response has shown how vaccine platform technologies can be used to rapidly and effectively counteract a novel emerging infectious disease. The speed of development for mRNA and vector-based vaccines outpaced those of subunit vaccines, however, subunit vaccines can offer advantages in terms of safety and stability. Here we des...
Article
Full-text available
The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to disrupt essential health services in 90 percent of countries today. The spike (S) protein found on the surface of the causative agent, the SARS-CoV-2 virus, has been the prime target for current vaccine research since antibodies directed against the S protein were found to neutra...
Article
Full-text available
Influenza viruses cause a significant number of infections and deaths annually. In addition to seasonal infections, the risk of an influenza virus pandemic emerging is extremely high owing to the large reservoir of diverse influenza viruses found in animals and the co-circulation of many influenza subtypes which can reassort into novel strains. Dev...
Article
Full-text available
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has infected more than 160 million people and resulted in more than 3.3 million deaths, and despite the availability of multiple vaccines, the world still faces many challenges with their rollout. Here, we use the high-density microarray patch (HD-MAP) to deliver a SARS-CoV-2 spike subuni...
Article
Full-text available
Nipah virus (NiV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) possess two surface glycoproteins involved in cellular attachment and membrane fusion, both of which are potential targets for vaccines. The majority of vaccine development is focused on the attachment (G) protein of NiV, which is the immunodominant target. In contrast, the fusion (F) protein...
Article
Full-text available
The current COVID-19 pandemic is caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome cor-onavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). We demonstrate that despite the large size of the viral RNA genome (~30 kb), infectious full-length cDNA is readily assembled in vitro by a circular polymerase extension reaction (CPER) methodology without the need for technically demanding...
Preprint
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SARS-CoV-2 has infected over 160 million people and resulted in more than 3.3 million deaths, and we still face many challenges in the rollout of vaccines. Here, we use the high-density microarray patch to deliver a SARS-CoV-2 spike subunit vaccine directly to the skin. We show the vaccine, dry-coated on the patch is thermostable, and delivery of s...
Article
Background Given the scale of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the development of vaccines based on different platforms is essential, particularly in light of emerging viral variants, the absence of information on vaccine-induced immune durability, and potential paediatric use. We aimed to assess the safety and immunogenicity of an MF59-adjuvanted su...
Article
Full-text available
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been identified as the causative agent of coronavirus disease 2019 and is capable of human-to-human transmission and rapid global spread. The rapid emergence and global spread of SARS-CoV-2 has encouraged the establishment of a rapid, sensitive, and reliable viral detection and quanti...
Article
Full-text available
Subunit vaccines exhibit favorable safety and immunogenicity profiles and can be designed to mimic native antigen structures. However, pairing with an appropriate adjuvant is imperative in order to elicit effective humoral and cellular immune responses. In this study, we aimed to determine an optimal adjuvant pairing with the prefusion form of infl...
Article
Full-text available
Two antibodies against flaviviruses Flaviviruses are a group of RNA viruses that include the human pathogens dengue virus, Zika virus, and West Nile virus. The envelope protein (E) on the virus surface has been the target of vaccine development, but problems have arisen with antibodies against E, leading to enhanced infection. Now, Modhiran et al....
Article
Full-text available
Background: We assessed the safety and immunogenicity of an MF59-adjuvanted subunit vaccine for COVID-19 based on recombinant SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein stabilised in a prefusion conformation by a novel molecular clamp (Sclamp). Methods: Phase 1, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted in Australia (July 2020–ongoing; ClinicalTrials.go...
Preprint
Full-text available
Efforts to develop and deploy effective vaccines against Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) continue at pace with more than 30 candidate vaccines now in clinical evaluation. Here we describe the preclinical development of an adjuvanted, prefusion-stabilised Spike (S) protein "Sclamp" subunit vaccine, from rational antigen...
Article
Understanding the molecular basis of the neutralizing antibody response to dengue virus (DENV) is an essential component in the design and development of effective vaccines and immunotherapeutics. Here we present the structure of a cross-reactive, neutralizing antibody, 3E31, in complex with domain III (DIII) of the DENV envelope (E) protein and re...

Citations

... We have previously developed a subunit vaccine of Middle Eastern respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV, referred to throughout as MERS) spike protein, stabilized in its prefusion conformation by a proprietary molecular clamp (MERS SClamp), which was shown to elicit potent neutralising antibodies (9)(10)(11). Given that induction of potent humoral and cellular immunity is likely required for a sustained protective immune response against MERS-CoV, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of MERS SClamp-induced immunity and investigated the effects of different adjuvant pairings. ...
... With a global commitment to the COVID-19 pandemic response, there is an opportunity to build on this momentum to develop more effective vaccination strategies against SARS-CoV-2 and other emerging pathogens. Together with emerging evidence from studies with MAP vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 Kuwentrai et al., 2021;McMillan et al., 2022;McMillan et al., 2021;Xia et al., 2021) and other viruses (Korkmaz et al., 2021b;Marshall et al., 2016;Nguyen et al., 2020;Rodgers et al., 2019), our results suggest that this MAP-based vaccination platform could enable simple, cost-effective global immunization campaigns against SARS-CoV-2 and other emerging infectious pathogens, with improved immunogenicity, safety, distribution, and compliance that together would improve coverage compared to vaccination using hypodermic needles and syringes. Our study comprehensively evaluated long-term antibody responses and polyfunctional cellular immune responses (both systemic and in the respiratory tract) to a MAP-based SARS-CoV-2 S1 subunit vaccine, with or without the Th1skewing adjuvant Poly(I:C). ...
... Consequently, neutralising antibody responses can block the association of virions with host cells to prevent infection. This technology has been validated in several vaccination studies in humans and mice for SARS-CoV-2 (mice and humans) (10,11,25), Influenza A (mice) (26), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (mice) (27). While the findings of this study are relevant for MERS-CoV SClamp, it would be anticipated that similar trends will extend to other antigens. ...
... With a global commitment to the COVID-19 pandemic response, there is an opportunity to build on this momentum to develop more effective vaccination strategies against SARS-CoV-2 and other emerging pathogens. Together with emerging evidence from studies with MAP vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 Kuwentrai et al., 2021;McMillan et al., 2022;McMillan et al., 2021;Xia et al., 2021) and other viruses (Korkmaz et al., 2021b;Marshall et al., 2016;Nguyen et al., 2020;Rodgers et al., 2019), our results suggest that this MAP-based vaccination platform could enable simple, cost-effective global immunization campaigns against SARS-CoV-2 and other emerging infectious pathogens, with improved immunogenicity, safety, distribution, and compliance that together would improve coverage compared to vaccination using hypodermic needles and syringes. Our study comprehensively evaluated long-term antibody responses and polyfunctional cellular immune responses (both systemic and in the respiratory tract) to a MAP-based SARS-CoV-2 S1 subunit vaccine, with or without the Th1skewing adjuvant Poly(I:C). ...
... VeroE6-TMPRSS2 cell line authentication was performed as previously described. 14 The STR profiling for authentication of HAT-24 was done as previously described. 6 Both cell lines tested negative for mycoplasma. ...
... Moreover, the prospects of QD and other nano-structured entities have the potential to be developed as biosensors to detect COVID-19 instead of the slow polymerase chain reaction technique. Toxicity-related issues are also at the forefront in the diagnosis and therapy of COVID-19 infections through nanotechnical means [596][597][598][599]. ...
... We have previously developed a subunit vaccine of Middle Eastern respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV, referred to throughout as MERS) spike protein, stabilized in its prefusion conformation by a proprietary molecular clamp (MERS SClamp), which was shown to elicit potent neutralising antibodies (9)(10)(11). Given that induction of potent humoral and cellular immunity is likely required for a sustained protective immune response against MERS-CoV, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of MERS SClamp-induced immunity and investigated the effects of different adjuvant pairings. ...
... Sclamp, initial findings have demonstrated favorable safety and the induction of a strong neutralising immune response. 15 However, the HIV sequences included within the Molecular Clamp were also found to stimulate an immune response that could cross-react with some HIV diagnostic tests. To avoid the issue of HIV diagnostic interference, we are in the process of reengineering the sequences used in the Molecular Clamp trimerisation; however, herein we describe the rapid development of the Sclamp vaccine, including antigen design and characterisation, production, and animal immunogenicity, safety and efficacy studies which permitted the transition to a human Phase I trial. ...
... Consequently, neutralising antibody responses can block the association of virions with host cells to prevent infection. This technology has been validated in several vaccination studies in humans and mice for SARS-CoV-2 (mice and humans) (10,11,25), Influenza A (mice) (26), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (mice) (27). While the findings of this study are relevant for MERS-CoV SClamp, it would be anticipated that similar trends will extend to other antigens. ...