Sin-Yeon Kim's research while affiliated with University of Vigo and other places

Publications (55)

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In animals living in groups, the social environment is fundamental to shaping the behaviors and life histories of an individual. A mismatch between individual and group behavior patterns may have disadvantages if the individual is incapable of flexibly changing its state in response to the social environment that influences its energy gain and expe...
Article
The transmission of detrimental mutations in animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to the next generation is avoided by a high level of mtDNA content in mature oocytes. Thus, this maternal genetic material has the potential to mediate adaptive maternal effects if mothers change mtDNA level in oocytes in response to their environment or body condition. H...
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Background Sexual signals produced by males play a central role in sexual selection, but the relationship between these traits and the quality of the bearer are often ambiguous. Secondary sexual traits may represent genetic quality of the bearer, resulting in positive relationships with physiological state, or may be costly to produce, showing trad...
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Wild-caught animals are often used in behavioural or other biological studies. However, different capture methods may target individuals that differ in behaviour, life history and morphology, thereby giving rise to sampling biases. Here, we investigated whether juvenile three-spined sticklebacks caught in a natural population by passive and active...
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Cognitive abilities may be crucial for individuals to respond appropriately to their social and natural environment, thereby increasing fitness. However, the role of cognitive traits in sexual selection has received relatively little attention. Here, we studied 1) whether male secondary sexual traits (colour, courtship, and nest) reflect their cogn...
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An organism may increase its fitness by changing its reproductive strategies in response to environmental cues, but the possible consequences of those changes for the next generation have rarely been explored. By using an experiment on the three‐spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), we studied how changes in the onset of breeding photoperiod...
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Early environment often has profound effects on phenotypic development that last throughout the lifetime. It has been suggested that unpredictable environments may favor cognitive abilities. However, cognitive challenges during development may result in life-history trade-offs, because complex neural reorganization required for coping with these ch...
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Trade-offs between the expression of sexual signals and the maintenance of somatic and germline tissues are expected when these depend upon the same resources. Despite the importance of sperm DNA integrity, its trade-off with sexual signalling has rarely been explored. We experimentally tested the trade-off between carotenoid-based sexual colourati...
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It has been proposed that animals usually restrain their growth because fast growth leads to an increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS), which can damage mitochondrial DNA and promote mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we explicitly test whether this occurs in a wild bird by supplementing chicks with a mitochondria-targe...
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Most studies of climate change impacts focus on the effects of summer temperatures, which can immediately impact fitness of breeders, but winter temperatures are expected to have a greater impact on development and growth of animals with long‐lasting consequences. Exposure to warmer temperatures can increase cellular oxidative damage in ectotherms....
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Background Conditions experienced by a female during early life may affect her reproductive strategies and maternal investment later in life. This effect of early environmental conditions is a potentially important mechanism by which animals can compensate for the negative impacts of climate change. In this study, we experimentally tested whether t...
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To fully understand the evolution of sexual dimorphism, it is necessary to study how genetic and developmental systems function to generate sex-specific phenotype as well as sex-specific selection. Males and females show different patterns of energy storage and mitochondrial metabolism from early stages of life, and this may underlie sex-specific d...
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Recent data suggest that, in animals living in social groups, stress-induced changes in behavior have the potential to act as a source of information, so that stressed individuals could themselves act as stressful stimuli for other individuals with whom they interact repeatedly. Such form of cross-over of stress may be beneficial if it enhances ada...
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In many bird populations, individuals show remarkable differences in feather colouration, which are often linked to individual differences in physiological traits, but the mechanisms maintaining this covariation are still unclear. Here, we investigate the variability of the melanic colouration in yellow-legged gull (Larus michahellis) chicks. In th...
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Phenotypic plasticity, the ability of an organism to express different phenotypes depending on the environment, provides an important mechanism by which an animal population can persist under rapid climate change. We experimentally tested both life-history and transcriptional responses of an ecological model species, the three-spined stickleback, t...
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In many bird species that practice parental care, siblings often compete for resources and care provided by their parents, although their strategies differ according to hatching rank and condition. Differences in offspring strategies are generally attributed to hatching order and maternal effects, which are difficult to separate because these effec...
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An animal’s personality may be an adaptive behavioral response of individuals to consistent differences in physiology and life-history. Studying the relationship between behavior and other fitness-related traits within the pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) framework, which explains the integration of different traits using the concept of a fast-slow lif...
Data
Appendix S1. Sampling of monitored sticklebacks. Appendix S2. Male–male competition experiment. Table S1. Results from the linear mixed model of body mass of male sticklebacks. Table S2. Variance components, heritability and environmental effects from univariate animal models. Table S3. Results from the random regression animal models of relati...
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Background: Secondary sexual traits and mating preferences may evolve in part because the offspring of attractive males inherit attractiveness and other genetically correlated traits such as fecundity and viability. A problem regarding these indirect genetic mechanisms is how sufficient genetic variation in the traits subject to sexual selection i...
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I experimentally tested the repeatability and plasticity of two antipredator behaviours, shoaling and risk taking, in a sample of 443 juvenile three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus. I quantified between-individual variation in these behaviours as well as behavioural changes over time in two groups of sticklebacks that were either expose...
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The environment can play an important role in the evolution of senescence because the optimal allocation between somatic maintenance and reproduction depends on external factors influencing life expectancy. The aims of this study were to experimentally test whether environmental conditions during early life can shape senescence schedules, and if so...
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Telomeres are sensitive to damage induced by oxidative stress, and thus it is expected that dietary antioxidants may support the maintenance of telomere length in animals, particularly those with a fast rate of life (e.g. fast metabolism, activity and growth). We tested experimentally the effect of antioxidant supplements on telomere length during...
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Predation is a strong selective force that promotes the evolution of anti-predator behaviours and camouflage in prey animals. However, the independent evolution of single traits cannot explain how observed phenotypic variations of these traits are maintained within populations. We studied genetic and phenotypic correlations between anti-predator be...
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Many bird species rely on visual cues for mate choice, including those provided by body size or by the size of a body appendage. Mate choice based on size may lead to size-assortative mating, which may in turn have consequences for reproductive performance. In this study, we examined whether body size influences mate choice decisions of Cory’s She...
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In species where females preferentially select the most colourful males, males may strategically invest in courtship and nuptial colour according to the presence of rivals. In this experimental study, we tested this in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) in which mature males exhibit carotenoid-based red coloration to attract mate...
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In species with biparental care, parents disagree evolutionarily over the amount of care that each of them is willing to provide to offspring. It has recently been hypothesised that females may try to manipulate their mates by modifying offspring begging behaviour through yolk hormone deposition, shifting the division of labour in their own favour....
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The evolutionary potential in the timing of recruitment and reproduction may be crucial for the ability of populations to buffer against environmental changes, allowing them to avoid unfavourable breeding conditions. The evolution of a trait in a local population is determined by its heritability and selection. In the present study, we performed pe...
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Empirical evidence has shown that stressful conditions experienced during development may exert long-term negative effects on life-history traits. Although it has been suggested that oxidative stress has long-term effects, little is known about delayed consequences of oxidative stress experienced early in life in fitness-related traits. Here, we te...
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The evolution of begging display may be influenced by gene–environment interaction, through the mechanisms that adjust begging behaviour to environmental conditions of offspring, including intensity of sibling competition within broods. We decomposed the complex begging display of yellow-legged gull, Larus michahellis, chicks into two different fun...
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Why do animals not grow at their maximal rates? It has been recently proposed that fast growth leads to the accumulation of cellular damages due to oxidative stress, influencing subsequent performances and life span. Therefore, the trade-off between fast growth and oxidative stress may potentially function as an important constraint in the evolutio...
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Conditions experienced during early life can influence the development of an organism and several physiological traits, even in adulthood. An important factor is the level of oxidative stress experienced during early life. In birds, extra-genomic egg substances, such as the testosterone hormone, may exert a widespread influence over the offspring p...
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Theories of ageing predict that early reproduction should be associated with accelerated reproductive senescence and reduced longevity. Here, the influence of age of first reproduction on reproductive senescence and lifespan, and consequences for lifetime reproductive success (LRS), were examined using longitudinal reproductive records of male and...
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Evolutionary theories propose that aging is the result of a trade-off between self-maintenance and reproduction, and oxidative stress may play a crucial role in such a trade-off. Phenotypic manipulations have revealed that a high investment in reproduction leads to a decline in the organism's resistance to oxidative stress, which could in turn acce...
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In multitudinous breeding colonies, kin interactions could go unnoticed because we are unaware of the kinship among adults we observe. Evidence of cooperation and competition between close adult kin in a blue-footed booby colony was sought by analyzing patterns of natal dispersal and proximity of nests. Male and female recruits nested closer to the...
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The relationships between breeding site location in forest habitat and age, behaviour and reproductive performance of Blue-footed Boobies Sula nebouxii were examined in two different plots on the northeast corner of Isla Isabel, Mexico. Birds nesting closer to the forest edge, where nest density is highest, laid their clutches earlier and fledged m...
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Contradictory patterns of density-dependent animal dispersal can potentially be reconciled by integrating the conspecific attraction hypothesis with the traditional competition hypothesis. We propose a hypothesis that predicts a U-shaped relationship between density and both natal and breeding dispersal distance. Using 10 years of observations on a...
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Philopatry over the lifetime and its relationship with reproductive success were examined using longitudinal records of nest location and reproduction of individual blue-footed boobies. Males showed shorter natal dispersal than females, and natal dispersal distance of both sexes were unrelated to either first reproductive success or lifetime reprod...
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1. Understanding the effects of individual and population factors on variation in breeding dispersal (the movement of individuals between successive breeding sites) is key to identifying the strategies behind breeders' movements. Dispersal is often influenced by multiple factors and these can be confounded with each other. We used 13 years of data...
Article
1.In many birds, parental nest attendance in early incubation is variable, with eggs incubated only intermittently. The effect of this on chick hatching success is unknown.2.We allowed clutches of a semi-precocial species, the herring gull, to experience different levels of early incubation constancy and examined the effects on embryonic developmen...
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For birds that breed in large colonies, the overall area occupied by the colony generally comprises several sub-areas that differ in physical and social features such as vegetation and breeding density. Birds arriving at a breeding colony select their nesting sites through a hierarchical process of selecting a sub-area, then a particular nest site...
Article
Physical attributes of a nest site can be important in determining the outcome of a breeding event. However, high-quality individuals may be more able to obtain particular sites, and thus habitat quality and individual quality are often confounded in correlative studies. We examined the potential sheltering effect of nest vegetation on the nest mic...

Citations

... First, repeatability sets the upper limit to heritability (h 2 ) (Boake, 1989; but see Dohm, 2002), and as such determines whether and how fast a trait may respond to selection (Boake, 1989;Croston et al., 2015;Morand-Ferron et al., 2016;Troisi et al., 2021). Second, measuring whether differences in cognitive traits are consistent is needed to understand the ecological and evolutionary relevance of their relation with a multitude of other biological traits (Soha et al., 2019), such as life history (Cole et al., 2012), secondary sexual traits (Alvarez-Quintero et al., 2021) or personality (consistent interindividual differences in behaviour across time and context, R eale et al., 2007). There is currently a strong interest in exploring how personality and cognition covary (Dougherty & Guillette, 2018). ...
... Indeed, in a recent study, we found that the level of oxidative DNA damage in sperm negatively influenced egg fertilization success in the same study population (our unpublished data). It is interesting to note that juveniles from redder families tend to die younger in this population due to genetic conflict between attractiveness and viability [36], and females do not prefer redder males in another adjacent annual population [57]. Nevertheless, red colouration may be selected due to its benefits for male sticklebacks in territory defence against other males [58,59]. ...
... In this test, fish should find the entrance to access a reward inside the cup, which is visible from all directions through the transparent wall of the apparatus. Before the test, the fish were exposed to the apparatus, which was placed in their respective individual tanks (without food rewards) for 24 h, to avoid neophobia and for behavioural adaptation (see also Álvarez-Quintero et al. 2020). In the trial after the 24 h exposure, the focal fish was familiar with the apparatus, showing no indications of neophobia, and tried to access the apparatus once the food (moistened pellets) was provided inside the apparatus. ...
... Normal metabolic processes generate reactive by-products, which induce oxidative damages in DNA, proteins and lipids [28,29]. Some empirical studies have shown that males investing heavily in secondary sexual traits not only suffer accelerated somatic deterioration [30] but also fail to maintain germ cells free of damage [29,31]. Deleterious oxidative damages in the soma reduce the individual's lifespan and future reproduction opportunities [32], and those in the germline can affect the immediate reproductive success by reducing fertility and offspring viability [29,[33][34][35][36]. ...
... Asterisks denote significant differences between treatments. et al., 2019).As these authors pointed out there could be other physiological processes, such as tissue growth and repair, that differentially modulate the expression of CS and COX in RBCs of birds (Velando et al., 2019). ...
... Another explanation could therefore be that AMPA-exposed tadpoles, that present an upregulated oxidative stress response (Cheron et al., 2022), will be selected against later in their life as observed in other taxa. For example, in three-spined sticklebacks Gasterosteus aculeatus, a temperature-related growth rate increase induced oxidative damage during adulthood (Kim et al., 2019). In European staling Sturnus vulgaris, oxidative damage in early-life affected inflammatory response in adults (Nettle et al., 2017). ...
... In the case of pathogenic infections in invertebrates, for instance, level and frequency of pathogens and danger-associated molecular patterns may indicate the pathogen's abundance and persistence in the environment where the offspring will be produced. Hence, the lower weight of females, maintained in infectious conditions or not, could also be a signal to promote individual fitness, as in many species (Mousseau 1998;Kim et al. 2017). If the lighter females have less available energy for their offspring for a given time or have smaller marsupia that constraint the oviposition of numerous eggs, then they may counterbalance the lower number of offspring in the first clutch by producing a second clutch as soon as they acquire enough energy to do so. ...
... Identification of sex-specific sequences, carried out on the material of 100 spawners of the threespine sticklebacks, showed that the fish sex, determined by exterior characteristics, always coincided with the genetic sex. This is consistent with the data presented in a number of other works (Griffiths et al., 2000;Arnold et al., 2003;Hahlbeck et al., 2004;Bakker et al., 2017;Velando et al., 2017). No evidence of sex reversal was found in this species in an experiment with removing maturing males from a group of fish (Bakker, 2016). ...
... Adults in the Intruded treatment may have displayed filial cannibalism (Jindal et al., 2017), but we are not aware of reports of within-group fry or juvenile cannibalism in this species. Alternatively, low early-life survival may have resulted from stress effects on parents that reduced the quality of offspring (Anderson et al., 2020;Beldade et al., 2017;Love and Williams, 2008;McCormick, 1998), stress transmission between group members that were particularly detrimental to young (Noguera et al., 2017), the direct early-life experience of outgroup conflict on offspring (Jonsson and Jonsson, 2014) or any combination of these factors. ...
... Another important feature of the plumage is the color of feathers, which can impact the ability of chickens to respond under HS conditions. A recent study demonstrated that dark chicks showed a lower expression rate of genes belonging to pathways of stress (cellular stress: SOD2 and HSPA8; DNA damage repair: ALKBH3) than paler chicks [74]. This happens because the plumage element reduced solar heat gain by 5% in both light and dark plumages. ...