Sigmund Freud's scientific contributions

Publications (45)

Article
Freud approved the overall editorial plan, specific renderings of key words and phrases, and the addition of valuable notes, from bibliographical and explanatory. Many of the translations were done by Strachey himself; the rest were prepared under his supervision. The result was to place the Standard Edition in a position of unquestioned supremacy...
Article
This chapter consists of eleven letters from Sigmund Freud to Wilhelm Fliess dated between November 11th, 1887 through August 2nd, 1893. These letters discuss client's background and diagnosis, Freud's family, professional meetings, and brain anatomy, neurosis, sexual functioning and hysteria. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights rese...
Article
This book consists of a selection of letters from Sigmund Freud to Wilhelm Fliess, a Berlin physician and biologist, written between the years 1887 and 1902. The letters, with other documents left by Fliess, came into the hands of a second-hand dealer during the Nazi period in Germany and thus into the editors' possession. Fliess's letters to Freud...
Article
This chapter consists of eighty-eight letters from Sigmund Freud to Wilhelm Fliess between June 12th, 1897 and March 11th, 1902. The topics discussed in these letters include, but are not limited to, case histories, memory, phantasies, psychology, neurosis, anxiety, Shakespeare, sexuality, hysteria, addictions, dreams, and bisexuality. (PsycINFO Da...
Article
This chapter examines the fundamental psychological problems that confront us in the structure of a group. The author attempts to offer a proof that libidinal ties are what characterize a group. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Article
In this chapter the author contends that the mental phenomena that are occurring in groups are derived from a herd instinct, which is innate in human beings just as in other species of animals. Biologically this gregariousness is an analogy to multicellularity and as it were a continuation of it. From the standpoint of the libido theory it is a fur...
Article
We may recall from what we know of the morphology of groups that it is possible to distinguish very different kinds of groups and opposing lines in their development. There are very fleeting groups and extremely lasting ones; homogeneous ones, made up of the same sorts of individuals, and unhomogeneous ones; natural groups, and artificial ones, req...
Article
Researchers agree that distributed modalities are an interesting new topic in the field of e-voting technol-ogy, and security experts concur. Such a claim at first glance seems unexpected but fell in line with our ex-pectations. After years of compelling research into simulated annealing, we validate the deployment of congestion control, which embo...
Article
En 1932, dos hombres clave del pensamiento y la ciencia del siglo XX, Albert Einstein y Sigmund Freud, intercambiaron correspondencia sobre las motivaciones profundas de la guerra y las posibilidades de evitarla. A cuarenta años de su escritura, el editor Rodolfo Alonso publica estas cartas y las acompaña por reflexiones de destacados psicoanalista...

Citations

... On 30 July 1932, having been requested by the League of Nations to invite a partner of his choice to an honest, open dialogue on the most urgent question facing civilization, "Is there any way to avoid war?", Albert Einstein wrote a letter to Sigmund Freud (Freud & Einstein, 1933). Einstein had himself realized that it was unworkable to create an international judicial agency whose task was to act as an arbiter in all conicts and whose decisions all parties, nations, and interest groups would follow. ...
... On the other hand, trying to avoid an hylomorphic perspective, Tim Ingold argues that the actual shape of the tool unfolds thanks to the interaction of human gesture and the developmentpotential intrinsically pertaining to the material itself (Ingold, 2013). Despite this opposition, that could be easily overcome considering mental imagery not as rigid schemes entirely existing a priori but as fluid and dynamic interaction between perception and knowledge (Freud, 1954), what appears clear is that assimilation requires reelaboration. It is not enough to see -or to hear something -to "grasp it". ...
... Twentieth-century psychodynamic psychiatrists predominantly argued that delusions of doubles or imposters were motivational and helped resolve painful ambivalent feelings of love and hate toward an important other, as the double or imposter could then be hated without guilt [10]. In other words, misidentification delusions were thought to represent an extreme form of splitting, a primitive defense articulated by Freud [11], Klein [12], and Kernberg [13] among others, in which a benevolent unconscious representation of another is preserved through the psychological process of splitting off their threatening attributes into a separate negative unconscious representation. Berson [10] argued that in Capgras syndrome, previously repressed hateful feelings enter awareness and "the patient declares… 'I hate this person, but I couldn't hate the real person who is so good [therefore] this person is a double.'" ...
... The cognitive effects of both the unconscious imposition of alternate imagery of normalcy and propriety, coupled with the conscious suppression of the resulting angst over resentment of 'normalized others', is a psychic powder keg. Called 'the rebound effect', the attempt to suppress these unwanted thoughts leads to anxious preoccupation with them (Freud, 1958;Wegner, 1988Wegner, , 1989Wegner & Schneider, 1989). When the urge to publicly vent the antipathy for representatives of 'otherness' is suffocated by what many right-wing populists refer to as 'political correctness', the need for transgressive catharsis grows-something that is readily evident in the public political gatherings of right-wing populism where expression is liberated. ...
... Para Sigmund Freud, el inconsciente es eterno, y se estructura más allá de nuestra particularidad histórica y espacial. El inconsciente, también, es conflictivo y antagónico porque las instituciones sociales se oponen al deseo de los individuos (Freud, 2013). El inconsciente es la expresión de un eterno conflicto. ...
... In her essay "Fiction and Its Phantoms", she also tackles the problems concerning homosexuality and sexual identity. She claims that placement of the doll Olympia in a footnote of Freud's "The Uncanny" is rather a "typographical metaphor of repression" (Cixous 1976, 537 after Royle 2003 and "it is a matter [ ... ] of turning the episode involving Olympia into satire, thus managing to eclipse and obscure it" (Cixous 1976, 532). According to Cixous, Freud's view on the doll concerning that she "can be nothing else than a materialization of Nathaniel's feminine attitude towards his father in his infancy'' (Freud 1919, 8) refers to "homosexuality" (Cixous 1976, 538 after Royle 2003. ...
... Sigmund Freud places the 'prehistoric' of sexual identity in the Oedipus Complex, dominated by the workings of the conscious and the unconscious 'heterogeneity' (Freud 1978, Beardsworth 2005. Repression of erotic feelings towards the mother and hostility towards the father who is seen as a rival is the unconscious layer of identity for the boy child, according to Freud. ...
... Freud (1920) mentioned this aspect of the infatuation of a homosexual female patient with a rejecting lover: "Her reaction took the form of great compassion and of phantasies and plans for 'rescuing' her beloved from these ignoble circumstances." Abraham (1922), in accounting for the fantasy in men of rescuing some important male authority -a fantasy that Jones (1953), incidentally, reports to have been central in Freud's daydreams -also emphasized the role of unconscious hostility in its formation. Sterba (1940) has maintained that hostility is always present in fantasies of saving; his clinical examples include a patient making the slip, "Doctor, I have had a rescue fantasy against you." ...
... If this is the case then I am afraid that nothing else will succeed … People will remain troubled by what they have done, grow restless and violent and return to the killing. (personal communication July 13, 2004) Dr. Harris' account of traditional ceremonies for returning warriors reminded me of those recounted in Freud's (1913Freud's ( /1974 Totem and Taboo, so I checked and in fact was all but identical to one of them. In this chapter Freud recounts the details of a number of ceremonies from around the world, from Timor to West Africa, to make the point that the experience of intense and conflicting emotions and the transition from one mental space to another requires some form of ritual to enable the symbolization and management of both the power and the intensity of the conflict. ...
... Of course we have much documentation of Ferenczi's humanistic clinical functioning once he became a psychoanalyst, from his own publications, the reports of his students Michael Bálint (16), Izette de Forest (8,9), Sandor Lorand (17), Clara Thompson (18), and from his colleagues, including his mentor, Freud (19), and even his political enemy, Ernest Jones (20). We also have the assessment of modern Ferenczi scholars which indicates he was one of the warmest, most creative, and empathic of the original circle that surrounded Freud (4,(21)(22)(23)(24)(25). ...