Shui-Hua Jin's scientific contributions

Publications (3)

Article
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We have previously reported the artificial creation of stable multiple queen honey bee colonies in China. Here we describe, based on our experience and primary research, the techniques necessary to successfully maintain multiple queen colonies and how they can be used commercially. Special care including the provision of sufficient food, avoiding r...
Article
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and have an indispensable role in pollination for agricultural and natural eco-systems (Morse and Calderone, 2000). A large colony population is necessary for a high yield of hive products (Chen, 2001). Because of this, for many decades attempts in Introduction The western (Apis mellifera) and the eastern (Apis cerana) honey bee are rare cases of i...
Article
Full-text available
Contests mediate access to reproductive opportunities in almost all species of animals. An important aspect of the evolution of contests is the reduction of the costs incurred during intra-specific encounters to a minimum. However, escalated fights are commonly lethal in some species like the honeybee, Apis mellifera. By experimentally reducing hon...

Citations

... The enhanced production could be chiefly attributable to the large population size (~11 combs of bees), a prerequisite for efficient RJ production (Zheng et al., 2018;Altaye et al., 2019). In two-queen colonies as in our study, a strong colony population could be rapidly built up and maintained with an increased egg-laying rate (Zheng et al., 2009). For Africanized bees in Brazil, two-queen colonies have also been shown to produce greater amounts of RJ as opposed to single-queen colonies (Camargo López et al., 2022). ...
... On the other hand, the method of mandible ablation has been used for more than ten years in China, and research shows that queens did not kill each other and coexisted peacefully, and given proper management, the advantages of multiple queen colonies such as providing larvae for royal jelly production, capped brood for the rapid build-up of production colonies, and workers for package bees outweigh the amount of work needed for their maintenance (Dietemann et al., 2008;Zheng et al., 2009). ...
... In general, organisms can use three types of information to make contest decisions: information about themselves, their opponents, or the contested resource (Taylor and Elwood 2003;Chapin et al. 2019). Surprisingly, some organisms do not use opponent information (Crabs: Prenter et al. 2006;reptiles: Stuart-Fox 2006;Smallegange et al. 2007;insects: Briffa 2007;Dietemann et al. 2008;spiders: Elias et al. 2008;Brandt and Swallow 2009;Constant et al. 2011;fish: Copeland et al. 2011;frogs: Reichert and Herhardt 2011;anemones: Rudin and Briffa 2011;McLean and Stuart-Fox 2014;Pinto et al. 2019). Researchers can test for the use of these information sources by observing changes in behavior in staged contests against opponents of different sizes, where size is a proxy for RHP Elwood 2003, 2009;Chapin et al. 2019). ...