Shelley L Ball's research while affiliated with Bates College and other places

Publications (15)

Article
Reliable and rapid identification of exotic pest species is critical to biosecurity. However, identification of morphologically indistinct specimens, such as immature life stages, that are frequently intercepted at borders is often impossible. Several DNA-based methods have been used for species identification; however, a more universal and anticip...
Article
We measured infection rates of a putative parasitic castrating ciliate, in a population of the obligately parthenogenetic mayfly, Centroptilum triangulifer. Eleven percent of females sampled contained ciliates. All infected females oviposited ciliates when their abdomen contacted the water surface during oviposition trials. Furthermore, none of the...
Article
Early detection of economically important insects is critical to preventing their establishment as serious pests. To accomplish this, tools for rapid and accurate species identification are needed. DNA barcoding, using short DNA sequences as species "genetic identification tags," has already shown large potential as a tool for rapid and accurate de...
Article
It is currently proposed that there are two species of honeydew-producing sooty beech scale insects (Ultracoelostoma spp.) in New Zealand. It is thought that U. brittini lives exclusively on trunks of southern beech (Nothofagus spp.) trees, while U. assimile occurs mainly on branches. This study aimed to confirm this habitat specialisation by using...
Article
Full-text available
Correction for ‘DNA barcodes for biosecurity: invasive species identification’ by K. F. Armstrong and S. L. Ball (Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 360 , 1813–1823. (doi: [10.1098/rstb.2005.1713][1])). On page 1819, the final sentence of the paragraph ending four lines from the bottom of the right-hand column was incorrect, and should read as follows: For ex...
Article
Full-text available
Biosecurity encompasses protecting against any risk through 'biological harm', not least being the economic impact from the spread of pest insects. Molecular diagnostic tools provide valuable support for the rapid and accurate identification of morphologically indistinct alien species. However, these tools currently lack standardization. They are n...
Article
We tested the efficacy of DNA barcodes in identifying mayfly species primarily from the northeastern United States and central Canada. We sequenced a 630-base-pair segment of the mitochondrial gene, cytochrome c oxidase 1 (COI), from 1 individual of each of 80 species to create a reference sequence profile. We used these reference sequences to iden...
Article
Full-text available
We tested the efficacy of DNA barcodes in identifying mayfly species primarily from the northeastern United States and central Canada. We sequenced a 630-base-pair segment of the mitochondrial gene, cytochrome c oxidase 1 (COI), from 1 individual of each of 80 species to create a reference sequence profile. We used these reference sequences to iden...
Article
Full-text available
Although much biological research depends upon species diagnoses, taxonomic expertise is collapsing. We are convinced that the sole prospect for a sustainable identification capability lies in the construction of systems that employ DNA sequences as taxon 'barcodes'. We establish that the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) can serve as...
Article
Full-text available
Although much biological research depends upon species diagnoses, taxonomic expertise is collapsing. We are convinced that the sole prospect for a sustainable identification capability lies in the construction of systems that employ DNA sequences as taxon 'barcodes'. We establish that the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) can serve as...
Article
Species in which both sex and parthenogenesis co-occur are extremely valuable for investigating ecological conditions favouring sex. Tychoparthenogenesis is a breeding system characterized by hatching of a small proportion of unfertilized eggs (typically < 10%) from females of sexually reproducing species. With tychoparthenogenesis, both sexual and...
Article
Tychoparthenogenesis is a breeding system characterized by low population mean hatching success (usually <10%) of unfertilized eggs from females of typically sexually reproducing species. I used progeny-array analysis to estimate outcrossing and parthenogenetic rates for two tychoparthenogenetic populations of the mayfly, Stenonema femoratum. Based...

Citations

... Although tracking the identity and origin of wild and aquaculture seafood products during their commercialization has become necessary, it also represents a considerable challenge due to mislabeling and substitution. DNA barcoding using the COI gene [4] has been widely used as a reliable and accessible technique for species identification and delimitation in a wide array of taxa [5,6]. ...
... There are several examples where barcoding has been applied successfully to study biodiversity, like identification of larval and juvenile organisms lacking morphological data (Neigel et al. 2007); identification of different shark species including those that are critically endangered and protected under international legislation (Swartz et al. 2008); faster classification of 210 chondrichthyan species from 36 families in Australia (Ward et al. 2008); and identification of endemism and intra-specific population structure in mammals in Southeast Asia (Francis et al. 2010). Furthermore, the most particular use of barcoding has been observed in the identification of species where morphological parameters are not sufficient as evident from examples like arthropods-a group for which sufficient taxonomic understanding is lacking (May and Harvey 2009); identification of larval stage in species like mayflies (Ball et al. 2005), stomatopods (Barber and Boyce 2006), and butterflies (Gossner and Hausmann 2009); and classification of species which have multiple life stages such as aphids (Foottit et al. 2009). DNA barcoding has also been applied for the discovery of cryptic diversity in skipper butterfly (Astraptes fulgerator) (Hebert et al. 2004); neotropical Lepidoptera (Hajibabaei et al. 2006); amphipods (Witt et al. 2006); diplostomoidea parasites of freshwater fish (Locke et al. 2010); oriental flies (Pramual et al. 2011); marine metazoans (Bucklin et al. 2011); and metazoans (Krishnamurthy and Francis 2012). ...
... This is now the gold standard for characterizing complex microbial communities from ecological studies and undertaking infectious disease surveillance Tonge et al., 2014;Nguyen et al., 2015). It combines the concept of DNA barcoding (Hebert et al., 2003) with the application of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. On one side, DNA barcoding uses short DNA sequences (barcodes) to standardize the identification of organisms from all kingdoms down to the species level by comparing the obtained sequences to a reference sequence collection from well identified species. ...
... are in line with values reported for other Baetidae in Southeast Asia (Labiobaetis: 11-24% in Indonesia, 15-27% in the Philippines; Kaltenbach and Gattolliat 2019;Kaltenbach et al. 2020a). Ball et al. (2005) reported a mean interspecific, congeneric distance of 18% for mayflies from the United States and Canada. The intraspecific distances are very low in most cases as expected, ranging from 0% to 1% (K2P). ...
... This standardized technique allows for rapid species identification and has valuable applications in improving biodiversity monitoring, both in terms of efficiency and accuracy in a wide range of taxa and ecosystems [12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19]. It also allows for the accurate genetic identification of alien species for timely mitigation of biological invasions [20][21][22]. ...
... Mate limitation is expected to be widespread in mayflies as they are characterized by a very short adult lifespan, which may generate strong selection for reproductive assurance (Liegeois et al., 2021). Consistent with this idea, negative correlation between sex ratios and/or hatching successes of unfertilized eggs and population densities have also been reported for the mayfly species Eurylophella funeralis (Sweeney & Vannote, 1987), Ephemerella notata (Glazaczow, 2001), Ephoron shigae (Tojo et al., 2006) and Stenonema femoratum (Ball, 2002). Reproductive assurance through facultative parthenogenesis can generate more strongly female-biased sex ratios, which in turn increases mate limitation for females and selection for parthenogenesis in a positive feedback loop, which can result in the loss of males (Schwander et al., 2010). ...
... This approach employs partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences (DNA barcodes) to assign unidentified specimens to known species (Hebert et al. 2003). In many studies, DNA barcoding has served as a powerful tool for the identification of scale insect species (Ball and Armstrong 2007, Malausa et al. 2010, Abd-Rabou et al. 2012, Deng et al. 2012, including native mealybug pests and others intercepted from different countries (Park et al. 2011b, Sethusa et al. 2014. Furthermore, DNA barcodes have been successfully used to identify mealybug nymphs (Park et al. 2011b, Beltr a et al. 2012 and to uncover intraspecific variation, and as evidence for cryptic diversity in mealybugs (Abd-Rabou et al. 2012, Park et al. 2011b). ...
... Spontaneous occurrence of parthenogenesis has also been described in species reproducing via a sexual mode and qualified as tychoparthenogenesis (Ball, 2001;Pardo et al., 1995). Tychoparthenogenesis is characterized by a low hatching rate and a weak survival probability of the offspring (Little et al., 2017). ...
... The utilization of molecular markers supports the identification of both the E. carteri and O. asiatica species since barcoding has been frequently advocated for species delimitation due to limited morphological characteristics and phenotypic plasticity ). CO1 has been utilized and recognized as the most suitable marker for the barcoding of almost all metazoans (Hebert et al. 2003a(Hebert et al. , 2003b. However, it has limitations on taxa that possess a slow evolution rate (Huang et al. 2008;Shearer et al. 2002). ...
... Despite phenotypic taxonomy going through a global reshuffling as experts rebalance their descriptions according to new-to-them information, the detection and monitoring of marine NIS using only this taxonomical approach presents additional challenges. Phenotypic taxonomy is not always able to reach species-level resolution and can lead to misidentifications, especially in the case of small or poorly studied NIS (e.g., meiofauna, zooplankton, protists) (e.g., Carugati, Corinaldesi, Dell'Anno, & Danovaro, 2015;Marchini & Cardeccia, 2017;Shang et al., 2019), damaged specimens (Armstrong & Ball, 2005;Trebitz et al., 2017), early life stages (eggs, planktonic larvae, juveniles) (e.g., Briski, Cristescu, Bailey, & MacIsaac, 2011;Hoffman et al., 2021), cryptic species (Cabezas, Xavier, Branco, Santos, & Guerra-García, 2014;Mohrbeck, Horton, Jażdżewska, & Martínez Arbizu, 2021;Nelson, D'Archino, Neill, & Robinson, 2021;Sun, Wong, Keppel, Williamson, & Kupriyanova, 2017), and early invaders which occur at low abundances (Darling & Blum, 2007;Harvey, Qureshi, & MacIsaac, 2009). Moreover, phenotypic taxonomy relies on access to reference literature and this can be challenging when the literature may be in a different language. ...