Selena Au's research while affiliated with The University of Calgary and other places

Publications (15)

Article
Purpose This study aimed to create a trigger tool for our intensive care units (ICUs) to support our departmental quality improvement efforts. Methods We compiled an initial list of triggers used in an ICU setting through literature review. We used a modified Delphi method to develop a unique set of triggers. An expert panel was selected for multi...
Article
Rationale, Aims and Objectives Guidelines recommend inviting family members of intensive care unit (ICU) patients to rounds. We aimed to create a toolkit to support family participation in ICU bedside rounds, based upon evidence from research and in collaboration with ICU family member representatives and healthcare providers. Methods Ethnographic...
Article
The mechanisms for neurological complications of COVID-19, the disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), are not yet well understood. We present a critically ill man with a COVID-19-associated hemorrhagic encephalopathy. SARS-CoV-2 RNA was not detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or blood. CSF analyses suggest...
Article
Rationale, aims, and objectives: Family participation in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) bedside rounds has been advocated as a way to improve communication between families and health care providers; however, the associated impact and modulators have not been fully described. The purpose of this study was to explore benefits, drawbacks, barriers, and f...
Article
Purpose: We aimed to describe point of care communication encounters with patients' families in centers with open visitation practices. Materials and methods: Cross-sectional one-day point prevalence study in 14 Canadian adult intensive care units (ICUs) located in 7 academic and 7 community hospitals with open family visitation policies. Resul...
Article
Objectives: Guidelines recommend offering family members of critically ill patients the option to attend interdisciplinary team rounds as a way to improve communication and satisfaction. Uncertainty remains around the benefits and risks. Design: We conducted an observational study to describe family participation in ICU rounds and its associatio...
Article
Objectives: Clinical ethics consultation as a mechanism for supporting patients, family, and staff during ethically challenging situations has become standard of care. Despite this, there is a lack of consensus about the effectiveness of clinical ethics consultation consultation in the ICU. We performed a systematic review of outcomes associated w...
Article
Purpose: To identify elements which enable patient and family centred care (PFCC) in the intensive care unit (ICU) and priorities for PFCC research. Materials and methods: We engaged a panel of multidisciplinary stakeholders in a modified Delphi process. Items generated from a literature review and panelist suggestions were rated in 3 successive...
Article
Purpose: To describe and compare intensive care unit (ICU) patient family member and provider experiences, preferences, and perceptions of family participation in ICU rounds. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of ICU family members and providers of patients admitted to 4 medical-surgical ICUs from September 2014 to March 2015. Measurements and mai...
Article
We performed a cross-sectional survey of family members of consecutive patients admitted to 3 medical-surgical ICUs (Calgary, Alberta, Canada) during the period November 1, 2010, to October 31, 2011, to assess self-expressed preference for physician attire. Participants were asked to rate the importance of 10 physician-related factors (age, sex, ra...
Article
A 58-year-old patient was admitted to the intensive care unit for severe hypercalcemia (total Ca 5.30 mmol/L) complicated with status epilepticus, hypertensive crisis and acute renal failure. Renal replacement therapy was explored as a method for treating medically refractory hypercalcemia. Because of hemodynamic instability during intermittent hem...

Citations

... • Nonmedical factors in clinical care: Clinicians are not ideally equipped to determine nonmedical aspects of prognosis, which include social support, spiritual beliefs, and socioeconomic factors. An interprofessional approach (including social workers and pas-S14 toral care) has been recognized as a key component in providing high-quality critical care to complex and diverse patients [139][140][141]. Institutional support for these aspects of care are often limited, with care burden falling to patients and their families. ...
... These symptoms are more common in the early stages of the disease and do not seem to last long in non-severe patients [199][200][201]. Other common and possibly related symptoms of COVID-19 are nausea, headaches, shortterm memory disruption, lack of attention, disorientation and irritability [202][203][204]. Despite being debilitating, they usually are not life-threatening. ...
... Furthermore, the organization and education of FCRs are important aspects of implementation. A structure or protocol with clear roles of FCRs participants should be studied and developed [70,71]. ...
... Normally, HCPs in ICU adopt many measures to meet family members' needs, where the communication is frequent and often less informal. 4 There is, however, still a need to reduce the psychological burden on family members of patients admitted to ICUs by the implementation of more structured information and support interventions. 5 The pandemic-related visiting restrictions have caused fundamental changes in the way it is possible to establish communication between family members and HCPs. A study on how HCPs perceive communication with family members during COVID-19 shows that they were very concerned about the family members' mental wellbeing, as it is well known that ventilated COVID-19 patients are at serious risk of dying. ...
... Improved information sharing by healthcare professionals on a regular basis results in a better-informed family. This sharing affords healthcare professionals the opportunity to explain the treatment plan and its related uncertainties to family members [43,45]. In some studies, healthcare professionals were also informed by family; they learned more about the patient's history, health, and life goals, thereby fostering an improved understanding of the patient and affecting the decisionmaking process [30,38,50,52,60,64]. ...
... For example, using a Cochrane review, researchers evaluated the effectiveness of clinical ethics supports, including CEC, in controlled studies limited to adult patients in intensive care units [36]. Other systematic reviews have assessed clinical ethics support services in the end-of-life context, intensive care units [37], or have focused on the activities of ethics committees [38]. Another topic examined through systematic review was CEC quality assessment tools [39]. ...
... Similarly, although guidelines for general family-centered PICU care are applicable to long-stay patients and their families, the use of GCM complements those recommendations by narrowing the focus on this uniquely vulnerable pediatric population. 36,37 GCM goes beyond commentaries from a single expert or a few experts by synthesizing the experiences and expertise of a diverse group of key stakeholders, including family members with lived experience. The generated cluster map empowers health care teams, hospitals, and health care systems to prioritize initiatives and programmatic changes that address opportunities to provide high-quality care. ...
... The studies were published from 2003 to 2021. Studies were from the United States (n = 8) (10-17), Canada (n = 5) (18)(19)(20)(21)(22), Israel (n = 1) (23), Iran (n = 1) (24), and multiple countries (Canada and United States; n = 1) (25). Studies were qualitative descriptive studies (n = 8) (12-14, 17, 19, 21, 22, 25), cross-sectional surveys (n = 3) (16,18,20), and interventional studies (n = 5) (10,11,15,23,24). ...
... Moreover, the appropriate neat and clean dressing boost the self-confidence of an employee too (Morgan, 2011). One of the research study also affirms this assertion as the study researchers found that attendants of patients admitted to ICU units of health care strongly in favor of doctors wearing white coat as they in conventional attire were considered as the most informed, sincere and competent (Au, Khandwala and Stelfox's , 2013). Hence, it is safe to say that neat and clean and professional out look of radiologist can influence the perception of patients regarding service quality. ...
... However, all the reported cases had severe hypercalcemia, either secondary to malignancy (3,4,5,6,7,8), vitamin D toxicity (9), iatrogenic calcium infusion (10) or granulomatous infection (11). Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) as a cause of PRES is an oddity with only a few cases reported in world literature (12,13,14,15). Herein, we report two cases of PHPT presenting as PRES and thereafter all the anecdotal cases hitherto reported in world literature are summarized. ...