Sebastian Baez's research while affiliated with Loyola Marymount University and other places

Publications (4)

Article
Full-text available
Public health researchers are increasingly interested in the potential relationships between social media (SM) use, well-being, and health behavior among adolescents. However, most research has assessed daily SM time via self-report survey questions, despite a lack of clarity around the accuracy of such reports given the current tendency of youth t...
Preprint
Building on Junco’s (2013) study examining the accuracy of self-reported computer-specific time on Facebook, the current study investigates the accuracy of self-reported time on multiple social media (SM) platforms across multiple electronic devices and evaluates whether reporting accuracy is systematically associated with participant sex, individu...
Article
BACKROUND Research suggests that the social media platforms popular on college campuses may reflect, reinforce, and even exacerbate heavy drinking practices among students. The present study was designed to directly examine: (1) whether exposure to alcohol-related content on social media diminishes the efficacy of a traditional web-based personaliz...
Article
Objective This study explored the burgeoning youth practice of possessing a fake, secondary Instagram account known as a “Finsta” in relation to exposure to alcohol-related content and college drinking. Participants First-year university students with at least a primary Instagram account (N = 296) completed online surveys. Method Surveys assessed...

Citations

... Additional studies have examined the validity of selfreported SMU across various platforms. For example, in a large sample of college students, Boyle et al. (2022) examined the accuracy of self-reported SMU across various platforms (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram [Mobile apps]) against a commercially available time management app. Results indicated variable under-and overestimation of SMU across apps, with newer apps (e.g., Snapchat, Instagram) evidencing greater overestimation than older apps (e.g., Facebook). ...
... For example, adolescents exposed to the highest quartile of movie alcohol exposure were at increased risk for every drinking milestone, including sipping (7% increased risk for every extra hour of movie alcohol exposure), initiation (risk increased by 49% to 53% over 2 years), consuming a full alcoholic beverage (increased risk by 6% for each hour of movie alcohol exposure), weekly drinking (2.4 times more likely), heavy episodic drinking (8% additional risk per hour of movie alcohol exposure), and binge drinking (1.7 times more likely; Bigman et al., 2020;Jackson et al., 2018;Waylen et al., 2015). Complementing this, exposure to alcohol in popular media can limit the effectiveness of alcohol interventions (Boyle et al., 2021). ...
... General use of Instagram, Facebook, and Snapchat, three of the most popular SM platforms among college-aged young adults (Villanti et al., 2017;Alhabash and Ma, 2017;Perrin and Anderson, 2019), are each associated with drinking (Boyle et al., 2018;Ceballos et al., 2018;Foster et al., 2020). Using more than one platform (Ceballos et al., 2018) and having a Finstagram account (an Instagram account characterized by tight privacy settings that is only visible to a small and carefully curated group of friends; LaBrie et al., 2021b) are also associated with measures of drinking risk. The primary pathway by which general SM use increases alcohol risk among young adults is exposure to alcoholrelated content (Moreno & Whitehill, 2014;Vannucci et al., 2020). ...