Sean Tucker's research while affiliated with University of Regina and other places

Publications (17)

Article
Introduction: The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between parents' work-related injuries and their children's mental health, and whether children's work centrality - the extent to which a child believes work will play an important part in their life - exacerbates or buffers this relationship. Method: We argue that high work...
Article
In this study, we test the widely held belief that young workers (aged 15-24) are less likely than adults (aged 25 and over) to speak up about safety concerns. Counter to this belief, and in line with age-related resource selectivity theory, we hypothesized that older workers would actually be less likely than younger workers to speak up about work...
Article
Injunctive safety norms (ISNs) refer to perceptions of others’ expectations of one’s safety-related conduct. Drawing on a sample of Canadian young workers (n = 11,986; M age = 17.90 years; 55% males), we study the relationships among four sources of non-work-related (i.e., parents, siblings, friends, teachers), two sources of work-related (i.e., su...
Article
According to social learning theory, powerful and high status individuals can significantly influence the behaviors of others. In this paper, we propose that chief executive officers (CEOs) indirectly impact frontline injuries through the collective social learning experiences and effort of different groups of organizational actors—including member...
Article
This paper reports on the prevalence of texting while driving and other risky driving behaviors by age and gender in two large samples of youth aged 16-19 years in Ontario, Canada. In Study 1 (N=6133), we found that males reported more frequent texting while driving and speeding than females and, in terms of age, sixteen year olds reported frequent...
Article
The present study examines the self-reported frequency of non-lost work time workplace injuries ("microaccidents") and the frequency of three types of work-related safety behaviors (i.e., safety voice, safety compliance, and safety neglect) recalled over a four-week period. We analyzed data on microaccidents and safety behaviors from 19,547 young w...
Article
Introduction: Although notifying an employer of a lost-time work-related injury is a legal requirement in many jurisdictions, employees frequently do not report such injuries. Method: Based on data from 21,345 young part-time Canadian workers (55% male), we found that 21% of respondents had experienced at least one lost-time injury, with about h...
Article
We examined the relationship among having ideas about how to improve occupational safety, speaking up about them (safety voice), and future work-related injuries. One hundred fifty-five employed teenagers completed 3 surveys with a 1-month lag between each survey. We found that participants who were more likely to have ideas about how to improve oc...
Article
Does dangerous work encourage young workers to speak up about their safety concerns? We conducted two experimental studies to test this question, with Hirschman's (1970) theory of behavioral responses to decline as a theoretical rationale. Study 1 (n= 159) manipulated two indicators of dangerous work - hazardous working conditions and experiencing...
Article
Introduction: This study examines young workers' responses to unsafe work through the lens of the exit, voice, patience, and neglect typology (Leck & Saunders, 1992). Method: In Canada, social marketing campaigns and high school curriculum concerning workplace safety for young workers promote the benefits of "speaking out" against dangerous work...
Article
We conducted four studies to develop and validate measures of workplace safety-related behaviors relevant to young workers. The conceptual basis for this set of measures is a range of behavioral responses to deteriorating conditions (e.g., exit, voice, and loyalty, Hirschman, 1970; exit, voice, loyalty/patience, and neglect, Rusbult et al., 1982)....
Article
The term “industrial voluntarism” has been used to describe the norm that dominated union organizing and, more broadly, union-management relations in Canada during most of the first half of the 20th century. In practical terms, the principle defines situations in which unions and employers initiate, develop, and enforce agreements without state ass...
Article
The term 'industrial voluntarism' has been used to describe the norm that dominated union organizing and, more broadly, union-management relations in Canada during most of the first half of the 20th century. In practical terms, the principle defines situations in which unions and employers initiate, develop, and enforce agreements without state ass...
Article
Social learning theory posits that one crucial way individuals learn how to behave is by observing and modeling the behavior of salient others. We conducted a short-term longitudinal study using multisource data on 183 teenaged ice hockey players (M age = 13.39 years) in 16 hockey teams to test the effects of 3 potentially salient leadership influe...
Article
Full-text available
In the present study, we modeled 2 sources of safety support (perceived organizational support for safety and perceived coworker support for safety) as predictors of employee safety voice, that is, speaking out in an attempt to change unsafe working conditions. Drawing on social exchange and social impact theories, we hypothesized and tested a medi...
Article
Full-text available
This empirical investigation showed that contrary to the popular notion that apologies signify weakness, the victims of mistakes made by leaders consistently perceived leaders who apologized as more transformational than those who did not apologize. In a field experiment (Study 1), male referees who were perceived as having apologized for mistakes...

Citations

... These indirect experiences are particularly important for young workers as they often lack prior work experience to draw from, and may rely more heavily on work-related adults (e.g., supervisors) and non-work-related adults (e.g., parents) as role models and sources of work-related knowledge to draw on. Moreover, these experiences may affect young workers' mental health (Hisle-Gorman et al., 2019;Turner et al., 2021), as well as physical health outcomes (Asfaw et al., 2012;Asfaw et al., 2016). ...
... A large number of human-oriented safety management studies have begun to emerge. Among them, employee safety voice behavior has caused more and more attention [1][2][3][4][5]. If individuals conceal safety-related issues of the organization and do not report hidden dangers they find, it may increase the difficulty of risk prediction and prevention, which will make the risk impossible to control and lead to safety accidents [6,7]. ...
... What do the potential influences of parents, supervisors, and teachers look like when considered at the same time? Pek et al. (2017) used a large sample of Canadian young workers (n = 11,986, age range: 15-24) to explore how injunctive norms from a set of social influences-parents, friends, teachers, siblings, supervisors, and co-workers-are simultaneously related to young workers' risk-taking behaviors and work injuries. Consistent with prior research (e.g., Westaby & Lowe, 2005), Pek et al. found that the social influences who worked most closely with the young workers, namely supervisors and co-workers, had protective roles in reducing risk-taking behaviors and injuries, but overall the set of social influences explained little variance (4.7%) in risk-taking behaviors. ...
... A second important factor is that American regulation of the employment relationship started first with "labor law," i.e., workers' collective rights to representation and collective bargaining, before it turned to "employment law," i.e., workers' individual rights under contract, various statutes or regulations. This occurred in part because early efforts at legislated improvements were overturned by courts, and organized labor developed a philosophy of "voluntarism," of looking for lasting improvements in the welfare of their members through collective action and contract (Estreicher 2010b;Tucker and Mucalov 2010). ...
... Whereas Study 1 utilized a student sample, in this study, we recruited our sample through Amazon's Mechanical Turk (mTurk). MTurk is an online community that is frequently used to recruit research participants who complete tasks in exchange for financial compensation (e.g., Kalsher et al., 2019;Marchiondo et al., 2015;O'Reilly et al., 2017;Schaumberg & Flynn, 2017;Tucker et al., 2016). The mTurk community is comprised of individuals from a variety of different professional backgrounds which contributes to the generalizability of findings from studies conducted within this community. ...
... Researchers across the globe have used a variety of data sources to assess distracted-driving events, including surveys, field observations, crash records, and naturalistic driving data (Asbridge et al., 2013;Beanland et al., 2013;Claveria et al., 2019;Dingus et al., 2016;Jashami et al., 2017;Tucker et al., 2015;Hasan et al., 2022b). Over the past decade, considerable research effort has been directed toward identifying the factors associated with crashes involving distracted driving. ...
... However, unlike the previous category of promotive voice, engaging in preventive safety voice is not necessarily related to the generation of new ideas to improve the organisational systems, and it does not entail a modification of the existing work practices or work procedures. Sometimes it can be also formally predicted by the national safety regulations (Tucker & Turner, 2014), which may consider a legal responsibility in the management of safety risks as shared by the workforce and the employers (Curcuruto et al., 2019a). ...
... A large number of human-oriented safety management studies have begun to emerge. Among them, employee safety voice behavior has caused more and more attention [1][2][3][4][5]. If individuals conceal safety-related issues of the organization and do not report hidden dangers they find, it may increase the difficulty of risk prediction and prevention, which will make the risk impossible to control and lead to safety accidents [6,7]. ...
... Additionally, it is likely young worker injuries in Alaska are being underreported. A study of Canadian young workers found that over half of individuals who experienced a lost time injury reported the work-related injury to both their employers and a doctor while 27% failed to report the time lost injury to their employer or a doctor [31]. Although, we are confident that the duplicates identified in this study are true duplicates, it is possible that we missed some duplicates due to data being input incorrectly. ...
... If individuals conceal safety-related issues of the organization and do not report hidden dangers they find, it may increase the difficulty of risk prediction and prevention, which will make the risk impossible to control and lead to safety accidents [6,7]. Safety voice means expressing personal opinions and inner concerns on workplace safety issues [8]. The positive effect of safety voice on the organization's safety management work has been verified in corporate practice. ...