Sean Burkholder's research while affiliated with University of Pennsylvania and other places

Publications (7)

Article
This project tests a cost-effective, innovative dredged sediment placement technique targeted to nourish an eroded barrier bar. The dredged sediment was placed in the nearshore in a Cobble Bell, a form designed to allow for efficient dispersal and migration of sediment by natural processes in this location (such as predominant waves and longshore t...
Article
The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)'s Engineering With Nature® (EWN®) initiative consistently promotes the use of collaboration for identifying innovative, nature‐based solutions (NBS) that lead to more resilient communities and water‐based infrastructure. In recent years, EWN researchers, in partnership with landscape architects (LA) affiliated...
Article
Damaging storm events frequently impact the Texas coast. In response, the US Army Corps of Engineers‐Galveston District (SWG) has undertaken the Sabine to Galveston (S2G) coastal storm risk management (CSRM) Project. This approximately $3.9B project includes numerous measures across several counties of the upper Texas coast, including levees, flood...
Article
Full-text available
Cities evolve through phases of construction, demolition, vacancy, and redevelopment, each impacting water movement at the land surface by altering soil hydrologic properties, land cover, and topography. Currently unknown is whether the variable physical and vegetative characteristics associated with vacant parcels and introduced by demolition may...
Article
In the Great Lakes Basin, a legacy of industrial use and localised depopulation has created a unique set of needs around storm water management and neighbourhood stabilisation. Vast quantities of vacant land present an opportunity for projects that can address either or both problems. Urban vacant land has its challenges: decision-making related to...
Article
In many cities within the Great Lakes region - on the water or next to the old steel mill, water treatment plant, or coal-fired power station - there sits a green behemoth. Likely riddled with invasive biota, these places are sediment dumps; landfills for wet soil. Generally given the name Confined Disposal Facilities (CDFs), these engineered lands...
Article
Full-text available
Urban environments are in continual transition. Yet, as many cities continue to grow and develop in ways deemed typical or standard, these transitions can be difficult to acknowledge. Narratives of continued growth and permanence become accepted and expected while the understanding of urban dynamics becomes lost. In many parts of the world, the shr...

Citations

... Relative to these examples, work of multidisciplinary project teams charged with implementing EWN that includes LA capabilities have been useful in building support for proposed NBS. For instance, abstract concepts, such as a desire to create a particular habitat feature, become linked to concrete imagery (King et al., 2021). ...
... In the U.S., the USACE began the Engineering With Nature® (EWN®, www.engineeringwithnature.org) initiative in 2010 focused on using NBS to balance economic, environmental, and social benefits through collaboration (King et al., 2020). Drawings and renderings showcasing EWN concepts can be used to aid decision-making that help communicate designs incorporating NBS within a structured decision-making process (Holmes et al., 2021a). Our experiences with implementing EWN in practice have revealed that successful collaboration focused on identifying and selecting NBS includes involving landscape architects (LAs) that can play a key role in accomplishing collaborative NbS project success. ...
... This results from the increasing frequency of floods and their negative consequences, resulting in economic and social losses [2]. Thus, it is important to note the retention capacity of a catchment [3]. The soil and its filtration capacities, i.e., the permeability of the soil or the surface layer of the soil, represent one of the most important factors in this respect. ...
... Vacant parcel assessment. To assess the thousands of demolitions that have occurred across Buffalo, NY (USA; Supplementary Fig. 1), an Urban Vacant Land Assessment protocol was developed and applied to vacant parcels across the city 63,64 . This protocol is a per lot assessment of general site information, parcel size, topography, vegetation, wastes, soil type, and hydrologic and land cover surveys of pervious and impervious surfaces (Supplementary Fig. 9; Supplementary Note 4). ...
... This shift has been underscored by a change in perception of such practices from linear to cyclical, which has re-framed the potential for sediment transport practices such as dredging. A number of projects have emerged in the Netherlands and North America which explore the potential of using dredge material for creating socio-ecological benefits, including the Times Beach in Buffalo, New York, Dike 14 in Cleveland, Ohio (BURKHOLDER 2016), the Sand Motor near The Hague, Netherlands (HOEKSTRA & KERSTEN 2014), as well as speculative projects such as Dredge Landscape Park (DE VRIES & HERREBOUT 2007). These projects provide important lessons and insights for designers in understanding the vast possibilities of dredge landscapes. ...
... As a result, these areas often contribute substantially to urban biodiversity by serving as derelict habitats for an array of species (Muratet et al., 2007). This characteristic makes urban vacant land a potential asset for urban regreening efforts aimed to enhance biodiversity and ecosystem services in cities (Burkholder, 2012). By focusing on a single, minimally managed urban habitat type, we were also able to more effectively assess the filtering effects of local assembly processes and avoid confounding factors associated with past and present human-management pressures (Vallet et al., 2010). ...