Scott T. Wallace's research while affiliated with University of British Columbia - Vancouver and other places

Publications (6)

Article
Patients with generalized social phobia (N = 32; 16 men, 16 women) and nonclinical control participants (N = 32; 16 men, 16 women) took part in a social interaction that was manipulated to be successful or unsuccessful. Participants rated their ability, perceptions of others' standards, social goals, and emotional responses before and after the int...
Article
Socially anxious and nonanxious men participated in a practice interaction with an experimental assistant, ostensibly in preparation for a second interaction with another student. The success of the practice interaction was varied by manipulating the assistant's behavior and the experimenter's feedback about the subject's performance. Subjects then...
Article
32 generalized social phobic outpatients and 32 matched nonclinical control subjects participated in a dyadic 'getting acquainted' interaction with an experimental assistant who engaged in either positive or negative social behavior. The accuracy of social phobics' and control subjects' perceptions of themselves and their partners were compared in...
Article
This study examined perfectionism and standard-setting within a self-regulation framework and systematically compared the roles of both factors in dysphoria and social anxiety. Four groups of subjects representing all combinations of social anxiety and dysphoria completed measures of self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism. They then ra...
Article
This study examined the discrepancy between self-established standards and self-efficacy in social situations. Socially anxious and nonanxious men rated a series of standards for judging the adequacy of their performance in an upcoming social interaction; subjects also rated their social self-efficacy, or perceived ability to handle the interaction...
Article
This study examined the effects of social standards on withdrawal from social interactions. Subjects with high or low perceptions of their social ability were provided with either a high, a low, or no social standard prior to an interaction. High-efficacy subjects persisted in the interaction when they could meet the standard and terminated the int...

Citations

... Fears of positive evaluation (FPE), or discomfort with receiving favorable public attention, was first referenced in a study by Wallace and Alden who found that individuals with social anxiety experienced elevated anxiety when receiving positive evaluation [16]. Explanations for FPE indicate that experiences of positive evaluation engender direct social comparison with others and may elevate others' expectations for, and scrutiny of, future behavior [17]. ...
... In addition, a group of researchers (Alden & Wallace, 1991;Asher et al., 2017) postulated that self and identity discrepancy could result in greater impairments in men with SAD. According to the Identity-Discrepancy Theory (Large & Marcussen, 2000) and Self-Discrepancy Theory (Higgins, 1987), the discrepancy between one's ideal self and actual self can cause distress. ...
... The findings in this study between emotional intelligence and social phobia relation can be explained by the fact that the capacity to manage and identify social situations is tightly connected to the meaning behind EI [85][86][87][88]. Thus, it is reasonable that patients suffering from social anxiety may have deficiencies in emotional intelligence levels. ...
... Hence, people who have social anxiety disorder and might be afraid of being evaluated, can experience low satisfaction in some everyday areas (family, job, money) (Dryman et al., 2016). In this line, people with SP think they need to perfect everything they do to meet other people's expectations; that was concluded after two studies proved that people with social phobia had a higher score on socially prescribed perfectionism but not on self-oriented perfectionism (Alden et al., 1994;Bieling & Alden, 1997). In this line, SP could play the role of mediator between perfectionism and LS (Dobos et al., 2021). ...
... Models of social anxiety point to a self-perpetuating cycle in interpersonal situations, such that an individual might behave in anticipation of or according to their expectations of how another individual might react or behave. 39,40 Cognitive biases and using safety behaviours, such as avoiding eye contact or seeking approval, reinforce and maintain social anxiety. 41 Furthermore, the strength of these symptoms could indicate their relevance in a transdiagnostic manner. ...
... In clinical settings, most studies of positive mental imagery were conducted as single interventions to promote PA in patients with major depression: these trainings were associated with reduced depressive symptoms and anhedonia, as well as increased optimism, positive self-referent cognitions and behavioral activation in clinical samples (Blackwell et al., 2015;Dainer-Best et al., 2018;Ji et al., 2017;Renner et al., 2017). Alternatively, positive mental imagery has also been discussed to enhance anxiety (Wallace & Alden, 1997) and trigger dissociation (Brewin et al., 2010). Another analysis by O'Donnell et al. (2017) showed that positive mental imagery training in individuals with high hypomanic experiences led to a dys functional amplification of positive mood. ...