Satoshi Imamura's research while affiliated with University of Oxford and other places

Publications (5)

Article
The purpose of this study is to explore the interactions between word orders and particles in Japanese transitive sentences in terms of information structure. To this end, a series of corpus analyses within the framework of the Givónian approach were conducted. Based on the present corpus analyses, I propose that scrambling is chosen when the scram...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of syntactic and information structures on sentence processing load were investigated using two reading comprehension experiments in Japanese, a head-final SOV language. In the first experiment, we discovered the main effects of syntactic and information structures, as well as their interaction, showing that interaction of these two fac...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents two reading comprehension experiments, using the sentence correctness decision task, that explore the causes of processing cost of Japanese sentences with SNOMOACCV, STOPOACCV OACCSNOMV, and OTOPSNOMV word orders. The first experiment was conducted in order to see if either syntax or frequency plays a significant role in the p...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents two reading comprehension experiments, using the sentence correctness decision task, that explore the causes of processing cost of Japanese sentences with SNOMOACCV, STOPOACCV, OACCSNOMV, and OTOPSNOMV word orders. The first experiment was conducted in order to see if either syntax or frequency plays a significant role in the...
Article
In Japanese, word order changes do not affect the grammatical relations between constituents, allowing both SOV and OSV word order. Although it has been assumed that the choice of word order is determined by information structure, it is unclear how OSV is related to information structure. In order to shed light on this issue, this article investiga...

Citations

... However, numerous studies claim that word order is affected by multiple factors (Arnold et al. 2000;Bresnan et al. 2007;Gries 2003;Heidinger 2013;Imamura 2014Imamura , 2015Imamura , 2017bKizach and Balling 2013;Rosenbach 2005;Siewierska 1993;Wasow and Arnold 2003). In fact, it has been revealed that not only heaviness but also other factors independently affect word orders directly, none of them being an epiphenomenon of other factors (Arnold et al. 2000;Heidinger 2013;Imamura 2014Imamura , 2015Imamura , 2016Imamura , 2017aKizach and Balling 1 3 2013;Rosenbach 2005;Siewierska 1993). These studies clearly indicate that heaviness is not the only dominant factor for the choice of word order. ...
... However, numerous studies claim that word order is affected by multiple factors (Arnold et al. 2000;Bresnan et al. 2007;Gries 2003;Heidinger 2013;Imamura 2014Imamura , 2015Imamura , 2017bKizach and Balling 2013;Rosenbach 2005;Siewierska 1993;Wasow and Arnold 2003). In fact, it has been revealed that not only heaviness but also other factors independently affect word orders directly, none of them being an epiphenomenon of other factors (Arnold et al. 2000;Heidinger 2013;Imamura 2014Imamura , 2015Imamura , 2016Imamura , 2017aKizach and Balling 1 3 2013;Rosenbach 2005;Siewierska 1993). These studies clearly indicate that heaviness is not the only dominant factor for the choice of word order. ...
... This filler-gap dependency is lacking in canonical SOV sentences. Koizumi and Imamura (2017) ran a self-paced reading experiment using the same factorial manipulation as Kaiser and Trueswell (2004) (i.e. supportive/ non-supportive × canonical/non-canonical word order). ...
... In psycholinguistic experimental studies on scrambling (e.g., Imamura et al., 2016;Koizumi & Tamaoka, 2004, 2006, 2010Mazuka et al., 2002;Miyamoto & Takahashi, 2004;Tamaoka et al., 2005;Tamaoka et al., 2014;Tamaoka & Mansbridge, 2019;Ueno & Kluender, 2003;Witzel & Witzel, 2016), the canonical order of SOV (S is subject phrase, O object phrase and V verb) was found to be faster to process than the scrambled (i.e., different) order of OSV. The delay in processing time between scrambled OSV-ordered sentences and their SOV canonical counterparts is known as the scrambling effect. ...
... Frequency of occurrence may play a greater role in processing for non-native than native speakers [5,6,8]. There is also debate concerning the processing cost linked to scrambling [36,49,[51][52][53]; for a more in-depth discussion, we refer the reader to Frenck-Mestre et al. [8]. Noncanonical OSV scrambled structures may be considered syntactically more complex (cf. ...