Sarita Schoenebeck's research while affiliated with University of Michigan and other places

Publications (54)

Article
Online harassment is pervasive. While substantial research has examined the nature of online harassment and how to moderate it, little work has explored how social media users evaluate the profiles of online harassers. This is important for helping people who may be experiencing or observing harassment to quickly and efficiently evaluate the user d...
Article
This project illuminates what data youth believe online advertisers and social media companies collect about them. We situate these findings within the context of current advertising regulations and compare youth beliefs with what data social media companies report collecting based on their privacy policies. Through interviews with 21 youth ages 10...
Article
Blind and low vision people use visual description services (VDS) to gain visual interpretation and build access in a world that privileges sight. Despite their many benefits, VDS have many harmful privacy and security implications. As a result, researchers are suggesting, exploring, and building obfuscation systems that detect and obscure private...
Article
Social media platforms aspire to create online experiences where users can participate safely and equitably. However, women around the world experience widespread online harassment, including insults, stalking, aggression, threats, and non-consensual sharing of sexual photos. This article describes women's perceptions of harm associated with online...
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Mothers use online resources frequently to obtain information on pregnancy, birth, and parenting. Yet, second-time mothers may have different concerns than first-time mothers given they have a newborn infant and another child at home. The current study conducted an on-line textual analysis of the posts of second-time mothers during pregnancy and th...
Article
The elevated satisfaction that comes from interacting with close ties, as opposed to distal ties, is well-established in past research. What remains less clear is how the quality of daily interactions between close versus distal ties may vary as a function of personality. Drawing on data from a 2-week experience sampling study ( N = 108 participant...
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Self-esteem, generally understood as subjective appraisal of one’s social worth and qualities, is related to how people use social media and the gratifications derived from their use—processes driven in part by social comparison. Two major components of the social media experience drive social comparison processes: (1) what content people engage wi...
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Social media platforms aspire to deliver fair resolutions after online harassment. Platforms rely on sanctions like removing content or banning users but these punitive responses provide little opportunity for justice or reparation for targets of harassment. This may be especially important for youth, who experience pervasive harassment which can h...
Article
Older adults are often portrayed as passive social media users who consume content rather than actively posting content. However, this binary divide between active and passive social media use overlooks nuanced kinds of engagement online. Via an eye-tracking study of older adults' Facebook use, this work shows how not clicking or commenting on cont...
Article
We are delighted to present this issue of the Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, which contains scholarship from the Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW) community. This issue has 190 papers, 177 submitted in June 2020 and 13 submitted in October 2020. It represents contributions from two Program Commit...
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Motivated by work that characterizes view-based social media practices as “passive use,” contrasting it with more desirable, interactive “active use,” this study explores how social media users understand their viewing and clicking practices and the empirical relationship between them. Employing a combination of eye tracking, survey, and interview...
Article
We are delighted to welcome you to this issue of the Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, which contains scholarship from the Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW) community. This is the second issue that represents the new quarterly submission model. This issue has 91 papers accepted from the January 2020...
Article
Digital data pervades everyday life, from personal photos shared on social media to voice commands for Amazon Alexa. A widespread industry culture of 'move fast and break things,' however, has compelled data management practices that prioritize profit over preservation. This paper draws from archival theories of appraisal to foreground control, pow...
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Most content moderation approaches in the United States rely on criminal justice models that sanction offenders via content removal or user bans. However, these models write the online harassment targets out of the justice-seeking process. Via an online survey with US participants ( N = 573), this research draws from justice theories to investigate...
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This mixed-methods observational study analyzes Advanced Placement (AP) Biology teachers' engagement in microblogging for professional learning. Data from three hashtag-based Twitter communities-#apbiochat, #apbioleaderacad, and #apbioleaderacademy (121 users; 2,253 tweets)-are analyzed using educational data mining, qualitative two-cycle content a...
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Parents can be subjected to scrutiny and judgment for their parenting choices. Much of this scrutiny is experienced online, especially around stigmatized topics such as divorce, custody, postpartum depression, and miscarriage. Prior theory suggests that parents might be able to access greater support online when anonymous, but other evidence sugges...
Conference Paper
Many decisions about social, economic, and personal life are heavily data-driven. At the same time, data has become increasingly quantified, and available to people and institutions in positions of power, often with little introspection or reflection on its positive uses or harmful misuses. This panel will inspect CSCW's role in identifying constru...
Article
What does reliability mean for building a grounded theory? What about when writing an auto-ethnography? When is it appropriate to use measures like inter-rater reliability (IRR)? Reliability is a familiar concept in traditional scientific practice, but how, and even whether to establish reliability in qualitative research is an oft-debated question...
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In this paper, we investigate how individual differences in availability preferences are related to (1) self-reported quality of interaction with strong and weak ties and (2) perceptions of bridging social capital. We employed experience sampling methods and collected data over the course of two weeks—combined with surveys at baseline and endpoint,...
Conference Paper
E-commerce sites have an incentive to encourage impulse buying, even when not in the consumer's best interest. This study investigates what features e-commerce sites use to encourage impulse buying and what tools consumers desire to curb their online spending. We present two studies: (1) a systematic content analysis of 200 top e-commerce websites...
Conference Paper
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The digital sharing economy has introduced opportunities for economic growth, productivity, and technological innovation. However, the adoption of sharing economy applications may be inaccessible to certain demographics, including older adults, low-income adults, and individuals who are not college educated. This research investigates how the demog...
Article
Most models of criminal justice seek to identify and punish offenders. However, these models break down in online environments, where offenders can hide behind anonymity and lagging legal systems. As a result, people turn to their own moral codes to sanction perceived offenses. Unfortunately, this vigilante justice is motivated by retribution, ofte...
Conference Paper
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Gender equality between mothers and fathers is critical for the social and economic wellbeing of children, mothers, and families. Over the past 50 years, gender roles have begun to converge, with mothers doing more work outside of the home and fathers doing more domestic work. However, popular parenting sites in the U.S. continue to be heavily gend...
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There is a dearth of research investigating youths’ experience of grief and mourning after the death of close friends or family. Even less research has explored the question of how youth use social media sites to engage in the grieving process. This study employs qualitative analysis and natural language processing to examine tweets that follow 2 d...
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There is a dearth of research investigating youths’ experience of grief and mourning after the death of close friends or family. Even less research has explored the question of how youth use social media sites to engage in the grieving process. This study employs qualitative analysis and natural language processing to examine tweets that follow 2 d...
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Full-text available
Online harassment is a pervasive and pernicious problem. Techniques like natural language processing and machine learning are promising approaches for identifying abusive language, but they fail to address structural power imbalances perpetuated by automated labeling and classification. Similarly, platform policies and reporting tools are designed...
Conference Paper
Consumers are turning to Facebook Groups to buy and sell with strangers in their local communities. This trend is counter-intuitive given Facebook's lack of conventional e-commerce features, such as sophisticated search engines and reputation systems. We interviewed 18 members of two Mom-to-Mom Facebook sale groups. Despite a lack of commerce tools...
Conference Paper
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Father involvement is important for child well-being. However, fathers still do significantly less childcare than mothers, due in part to traditional gender norms. This research investigates whether incorporating do-it-yourself (DIY) language and imagery into parenting blogs is an effective mechanism for boosting fathers' willingness to perform chi...
Conference Paper
Prior research shows that parents receive a number of benefits through sharing about their children online, but little is known about children?s perspectives about parent sharing. We conducted a survey with 331 parent-child pairs to examine parents? and children?s preferences about what parents share about their children on social media. We find th...
Conference Paper
E-commerce designers must decide how many products to display at one time. Choice overload research has demonstrated the surprising finding that more choice is not necessarily better?selecting from larger choice sets can be more cognitively demanding and can result in lower levels of choice satisfaction. This research tests the choice overload effe...
Conference Paper
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Prior research shows that the social construction of gender evolves in relation to specific economic and social processes. This paper examines how the practice of DIY (do-it-yourself) making has become a productive frame for a collective of fathers in the U.S. to express masculinity, amidst increasingly precarious economics and shifting norms of ge...
Article
This article advances a contextual approach to understanding the emotional and social outcomes of Facebook use. In doing so, we address the ambiguity of previously reported relationships between Facebook use and well-being. We test temporal (shorter vs longer time spans) and spatial (at home vs away from home) dimensions of Facebook activity using...
Article
Ephemeral social media, platforms that display shared content for a limited period of time, have become a prominent component of the social ecosystem. We draw on experience sampling data collected over two weeks (Study 1; N=154) and in-depth interview data from a subsample of participants (Study 2; N = 28) to understand college students’ social and...
Conference Paper
Families are becoming more culturally heterogeneous due to a rise in intermarriage, geographic mobility, and access to a greater diversity of cultural perspectives online. Investigating the challenges of cross-cultural parenting can help us support this growing demographic, as well as better understand how families integrate and negotiate advice fr...
Conference Paper
Mealtimes are a cherished part of everyday life around the world. Often centered on family, friends, or special occasions, sharing meals is a practice embedded with traditions and values. However, as mobile phone adoption becomes increasingly pervasive, tensions emerge about how appropriate it is to use personal devices while sharing a meal with ot...
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Increasing numbers of American parents identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT). Shifting social movements are beginning to achieve greater recognition for LGBT parents and more rights for their families; however, LGBT parents still experience stigma and judgment in a variety of social contexts. We interviewed 28 LGBT parents to in...
Conference Paper
Individuals are increasingly visible in online spaces. Posting content to social media, browsing websites, and interacting with friends are all acts that render a person visible to other individuals, networks, and corporations. At the same time, these behaviors are being logged, archived, and aggregated in a variety of unexpected and emerging ways....
Conference Paper
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Parents and children both use technology actively and increasingly, but prior work shows that concerns about attention, family time, and family relationships abound. We conducted a survey with 249 parent-child pairs distributed across 40 U.S. states to understand the types of technology rules (also known as restrictive mediation) they have establis...
Article
Parents, educators, and policymakers have expressed concern about the future implications of young people's sharing practices on social media sites. However, little is known about how young people themselves feel about their online behaviors being preserved and resurfaced later in adulthood. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 28 college-g...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The number of stay-at-home dads (SAHDs) in the U.S. has risen dramatically over the past 30 years. Despite gaining social acceptability, SAHDs still experience isolation and judgment in their offline environments. This research explores how SAHDs use the Internet and social media related to their roles as fathers. We conducted interviews with 18 SA...
Article
Extensive scholarship has investigated technology use among families. Existing work has focused primarily on parents' reactions to and restrictions of their children's technology use; here, we explore the underlying tensions surrounding technology use in the home. We draw on historical perspectives of adolescence and family life to better understan...
Conference Paper
In this work, we designed and field-tested a system called Home Trivia to explore how we can use activity traces captured in the home to allow household members to reflect on how they use technology, which has become an issue of increasing concern among families that have seen their home lives intertwined with Internet-enabled devices. Home Trivia...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Theories of empowerment explain how people gain personal and political control to take action to improve their lives. However, empowerment theories were developed prior to the Internet and fail to account for the speed and scale that people can find one another online. One domain where empowerment is critical is caring for children with special nee...
Conference Paper
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While extensive research has investigated the risks of children sharing their personal information online, little work has investigated the implications of parents sharing personal information about their children online. Drawing on 102 interviews with parents in the U.S., we investigate how parents decide what to disclose about their children on s...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Fathers are taking on more childcare and household responsibilities than they used to and many non-profit and government organizations have pushed for changes in policies to support fathers. Despite this effort, little research has explored how fathers go online related to their roles as fathers. Drawing on an interview study with 37 fathers, we fi...
Conference Paper
The practice of sharing family photographs is as old as the camera itself. Many mothers now share baby photos online, yet little is known about what kinds of baby photos they share and their motivations for doing so. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with 22 new mothers, we find that they share cute, funny, milestone, and family and friend phot...
Article
Social media use is widespread, but many people worry about overuse. This paper explores how and why people take breaks from social media. Using a mixed methods approach, we pair data from users who tweeted about giving up Twitter for Lent with an interview study of social media users. We find that 64% of users who proclaim that they are giving up...
Conference Paper
Facebook is a global phenomenon, yet little is known about use of the site in urban parts of the developing world where the social network's users are increasingly located. We qualitatively studied Facebook use among 28 young adults living in Viwandani, an informal settlement, or slum, in Nairobi, Kenya. We find that to overcome the costs associate...
Conference Paper
Facebook use is pervasive in developed countries where computers, smartphones, high-bandwidth Internet, and electricity are ubiquitous. In this paper, we examine Facebook use in a country where social media participation is growing, but less developed technological infrastructures and uneven access to technology limit use. We conducted observations...

Citations

... 2A Negative Behaviours: Current literature establishes a range of factors contributing to the rise of online abusive behaviours. Factors to consider at the individual level include pro-victim attitudes [44], perceptions of norms and injustice [17], and the contexts of exchanges [17,105]. Other relevant factors of cyberbullying relate to features of cyberspace, such as the anonymity and distance between users which can result in a sense of impunity and deindividuation. ...
... Our work contributes to a growing line of research that applies alternative justice frameworks to address online harm [21,26,43,44,77,90,93]. By examining how we can adapt successful offline restorative justice practices to online communities, our work sheds light on ways to address the needs of key stakeholders that go beyond maintaining healthy community content and working within a perpetrator-oriented model. ...
... The parent-child relationship is one of the pressure sources during the transition from a one-child family to a two-child family. Beyers-Carlso [6] analyzed 160 thousand posts on BabyCenter.com related to parenting problems from second-time mothers and found that whether the firstborn child can accept the second one and whether parents can treat the two children equally are the two themes discussed very often. J. Liu and Zhou [7] also showed that about one-third of firstborns were not supportive or neutral toward the coming siblings before birth. ...
... al. [8] illustrated that the levels of self-esteem were found to be negatively correlated with social media addiction. In a similar note, Triệu, P., Ellison, N. B., Schoenebeck, S. Y., & Brewer [10] found that the more time one spends on looking at the posts and scrolling through more of it, the lesser will be one's self -esteem, especially for people with more content to engage with on their Facebook feeds. ...
... The ideal use-case of TERF detection should be grounded within a framework of restorative justice (Schoenebeck and Blackwell, 2021); instead of punitive retribution, we seek rehabilitation through mutual engagement, dialogue, and consensus. Users should be able to decide how to engage upon encountering a TERF guided by an assessment of TERFs stance (e.g., transphobic severity) and whether they are equipped and able to put in the labor of understanding and addressing their fears. ...
... According to different researchers, elderly people fundamentally discuss family issues and their concerns on social media. Based on this research paper, the researcher has found that grandparents generally show concern about their family members and well-being by engaging in family matter discussions (Brewer et al., 2021). After the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, grandparents show their urge to be updated regarding the health situation of the family members. ...
... Some researchers believe that trust is primarily a psychological condition of perceived vulnerability or risk caused by people's uncertainty about the motives, intentions, and future behaviour of those they trust. Trust is closely related to privacy, as it enables us to share vulnerable aspects of ourselves with others while also getting to know them intimately [63]. Some researchers look at trust as a heuristic (a short-term cognitive process) that can speed up the disclosure decision-making process by replacing a calculative judgment regarding the requested information (e.g., in our study, the perception that the requested information would improve the quality of the application's recommendations, versus the perception that the requested information is sensitive) with an intuitive judgment regarding the requester of the information [30]. ...
... Finally, we note again that there have been challenges to the distinction between active and passive use, such as in regard to the passive social media use hypothesis (e.g., Valkenburg et al., 2022). In addition, Ellison et al. (2020) recently argued that clicking and viewing should be conceptualized as distinct behaviors that do not fit neatly into the active/passive dichotomy, yet, they found no significant difference in users' viewing time spent on clicked and non-clicked content. They also argued that non-clicking can be a thoughtful (active) behavior, although we note that we did not include 'non-clicking' in our subjective measure. ...
... Our work contributes to a growing line of research that applies alternative justice frameworks to address online harm [21,26,43,44,77,90,93]. By examining how we can adapt successful offline restorative justice practices to online communities, our work sheds light on ways to address the needs of key stakeholders that go beyond maintaining healthy community content and working within a perpetrator-oriented model. ...
... Whereas the importance of these high-quality PD features for advancing teachers' knowledge and beliefs, changing teaching practice, and improving student performance are well documented for traditional PD activities (e.g., Desimone & Garet, 2015;Fischer et al., 2018), the research base examining how online communities may relate to these high-quality PD features and to online community of practice features is limited. An exception is initial work by Fischer et al. (2019) indicating that Twitter communities may indeed fulfill the high-quality PD features of collective participation and duration for some users. This study extends this earlier work, particularly focusing on how participation on Twitter may have the characteristics of coherence and content focus. ...