Sarah Borden Sharkey's research while affiliated with Wheaton College (MA) and other places

Publications (7)

Chapter
Aristotle’s descriptions of women present a strikingly consistent account of the natural inferiority of women. He approaches the issue from a number of different angles, affirming in each case his basic premise that females—because they are female rather than male—are less well actualized human beings. Nonetheless, there are at least four areas of...
Chapter
We all grow and develop and must do so ‘where we are planted,’ in the time and era in which we live, among and with our contemporaries. Aristotelian hylomorphism, although perhaps a bit simple in its original form in light of contemporary biology, nonetheless provides a set of useful concepts and distinctions, ones that can acknowledge our deeply s...
Chapter
Prudence Allen subtitles the first volume of her mammoth history of the concept of woman, covering 750 BC to AD 1250, “The Aristotelian Revolution.” Aristotle’s works came to dominate the universities in the high Middle Ages and early Renaissance periods, and his account of women “crushed,” as Allen puts it, alternative Western understandings of wo...
Chapter
The notion of an “Aristotelian feminism,” although by no means a dominant approach in feminism, exists in several forms—the most significant of which is Martha Nussbaum’s “capabilities approach.” Nussbaum presents a compelling and important form of feminism, drawing significant inspiration from aspects of Aristotle’s thought. The version I would li...
Chapter
In this final chapter, I would like to provide an example of what an Aristotelian feminism might look like in practice, that is, the way in which an Aristotelian feminist might critique and evaluate current structures. The position, as presented thus far, is simply intended as a broad sketch; it claims that an Aristotelian feminism emphasizes the s...
Chapter
The primary goal of this book is theoretical, articulating the broad structure of a substantial version of Aristotelian feminism. Although such a general version of this position might be useful in addressing certain issues of feminist concern (for example, the structure of university education, as discussed in Chap. 6), it cannot be put to signifi...
Book
This book articulates the theoretical outlines of a feminism developed from Aristotle’s metaphysics, making a new contribution to feminist theory. Readers will discover why Aristotle was not a feminist and how he might have become one, through an investigation of Aristotle and Aristotelian tradition. The author shows how Aristotle’s metaphysics can...