Samantha J. Capon's research while affiliated with Griffith University and other places

Publications (14)

Article
Supratidal wetlands are threatened by agricultural production and are highly vulnerable to climate change, particularly through sea level rise (SLR). While vegetation structure and composition of supratidal wetlands will likely change under projected SLR with run‐on effects for ecosystem service provision, these changes can provide opportunities fo...
Article
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Revegetating abandoned agricultural lands is vital to restoring critical ecological functions and services. Natural regeneration, whereby vegetation regrows via the seeds already present within the landscape, has shown to be an effective approach to restoring large agricultural areas, although more research is required to understand the regenerativ...
Article
Context Investigating resource competition between introduced and native species is important to understand the impacts of invasive species, not only on native species, but also with respect to the wider ecosystem. Within the Lake Eyre Basin, there is concern that feral populations of the tropical Cherax quadricarinatus are outcompeting the basins’...
Preprint
In semi-arid landscapes, water regimes play a critical role in shaping patterns of vegetation regeneration. In riparian and floodplain habitats, however, the importance of flooding versus rainfall is poorly established for many species and habitats. Here, we present the results of a field experiment designed to investigate the establishment respons...
Article
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Environmental water management is increasingly used to restore riverine, wetland and floodplain ecosystems and requires an understanding of what the flow regime or restoration objectives are, why these objectives are being targeted and how outcomes will be evaluated. This perspective paper focuses on non-woody vegetation, an important component of...
Article
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Freshwater ecosystems are highly vulnerable to global warming because 1) their chief drivers, water quality and flow regimes, are highly sensitive to atmospheric warming, and 2) they are already extremely threatened by a wide range of interacting anthropogenic pressures. Even relatively modest global warming of 1.5°C poses a considerable threat to...
Article
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Many water scientists aim for their work to inform water policy and management, and in pursuit of this objective, they often work alongside government water agencies to ensure their research is relevant, timely and communicated effectively. A paper in this issue, examining 'Science integrity, public policy and water governance in the Murray-Darling...
Article
In dryland environments where rivers have been modified by water resource developments, the use of environmental water provides a management tool to restore or maintain riparian vegetation conditions. Relevant management actions include watering to promote the recruitment of highly valued woody species. However, for many riparian trees, little is k...
Article
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Evaluating wetland vegetation responses to flow regimes is challenging because of the inherently complex, variable and dynamic nature of wetland vegetation in space and time. We propose four principles to guide the development of management objectives and evaluation approaches to support adaptive management of wetland vegetation in flow-managed sys...
Cover Page
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The cover image is based on the Focus Article Healthy waterways and ecologically sustainable cities in Beijing‐Tianjin‐Hebei urban agglomeration (northern China): Challenges and future directions by Giri Kattel et al., https://doi.org/10.1002/wat2.1500. Abstract The cover image is based on the Focus Article Healthy waterways and ecologically susta...
Article
Coastal freshwater wetlands (CFWs) are among the most understudied wetlands globally and are highly vulnerable to projected climate changes. To address CFW knowledge gaps in south-east Queensland, Australia, we surveyed the floristic composition and structure of wooded CFWs and explored variation in vegetation patterns in relation to selected envir...
Chapter
This chapter presents an overview of the aquatic ecosystems of the Murray–Darling Basin (MDB). Ecosystem types within the Basin are diverse, ranging from small upland streams to the coastal estuary at the river mouth. The vast floodplains and associated rivers and wetlands are the most iconic habitats of the MDB, together with rich communities of p...
Article
Full-text available
The cities across the northern dry region of China are exposed to multiple sustainability challenges. Beijing‐Hebei‐Tianjin (BTH) urban agglomeration, for example, experiences severe water shortages due to rapidly expanding urban populations, industrial use, and irrigation‐intensive agriculture. Climate change has further threatened water resources...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal wetlands are significant components of the coastal landscape with important roles in ecosystem service provision and mitigation of climate change. They are also likely to be the system most impacted by climate change, feeling the effects of sea levels rise, temperature increases and rainfall regime changes. Climate change impacts on estuari...

Citations

... Ongoing monitoring and the provision of data are fundamental inputs to the adaptive management of environmental water. Monitoring also provides a way to track progress against objectives or targets [31] and evaluate the public investment in environmental water. ...
... Increases in the availability of reactive nitrogen (Nr) in the environment due to human activities has altered the cycle of nitrogen (N) over the last century (Galloway and Cowling, 2021). Among global ecosystems, freshwater ecosystems (e.g., rivers and lakes) are considered suitable models to examine changes in processes related to the functioning of the N cycle as they are sensitive to nutrient loads across large spatial and temporal scales (Smith, 2003;Catalán et al., 2006;Capon et al., 2021;Medina-Sánchez et al., 2022). In mountain freshwater ecosystems, Nr is mainly introduced via wet deposition in the form of nitrate (NO − 3 ), but human activities can also introduce N into aquatic ecosystems at lower altitudes (Castellano-Hinojosa et al., 2017Siles and Margesin, 2017). ...
... Previous reforms in the MDB have been contentious, with deep contestations about whether climate adaptation mechanisms were effective (see contrasting accounts in Pittock, Grafton, and Williams 2015;Neave et al. 2015). There are continued conflicts about climate risk management (Colloff and Pittock 2019;Walker 2019;Alexandra and Rickards 2021) and ongoing debates about the politicisation of science and its roles in water policy (Colloff, Grafton, and Williams 2021;Stewardson et al. 2021). These conflicts in the MDB indicate the need to build greater trust at the sciencepolicy interface (Lacey et al. 2018), and at the policysociety interface, to better enable robust policy development through open discursive investigations and respectful debate about policy options, including through far reaching discussions about the MDB adaptation options. ...
... The accuracy of water depth information required for each application is likely to differ. Glass house experiments suggest that estimating establishment rates of Eucalyptus camaldulensis seedlings at a particular site are sensitive to changes at decimeter scale (Balcombe et al., 2021;Durant et al., 2016). Studies into bird breeding show some species are strongly correlated to floodwater depth at a centimeter scale (McGinness et al., 2019). ...
... Coastal wetlands, found within continental margins, are low-lying areas of extraordinarily high biodiversity and with high human accessibility [1][2][3]. Many types of wetlands, ranging from saline wetlands (such as mangroves and saltmarshes) that are regularly inundated with sea water to freshwater swamps upstream of the tidal limit in estuaries where salinity is rarely above 0.5 ppt [4], occur along the gradients of tidal influence. ...
... In particular, naturally dynamic responses of vegetation to variable water regimes are not well represented by static descriptions of condition . Following the principles of Campbell, James et al. (2021), wetland ecological condition needs to consider i) various scales and levels of ecological organisation, ii) temporal context and complexity, iii) non-hydrological modifying factors, and iv) align with management objectives and ecological, sociocultural and economic functions and values. In this perspective article we consider what we want to achieve by targeting watering for wetland vegetation condition. ...
... There are also 16 internationally significant (Ramsar) wetlands in the MDB that cover more than 6300 km 2 [6]. The Basin also supports 46 native fish species, 120 waterbird species and hundreds of water-dependent native plant species [7,8]. ...
... However, the cost-sharing scheme of the ER-SNWDP among each water user is not implemented smoothly. Two main reasons may be to the cause of this problem; one is that for the sake of convenience of calculation and management, the route is divided into several sections by the government, because the engineering investment of this project is dominated by the government rather than the market [22,23,24]. The second reason is that the sharing costs of each section are directly considered as a given parameter [25]. ...
... Their ability to remove nitrate (NO 3 -) from surface waters is particularly important as it helps ameliorate coastal eutrophication (Hansen et al., 2018, Jordan et al., 2011. Research considering how coastal wetlands respond to climate change stressors has predominately focused on brackish and marine systems, with less attention focused on the response of coastal freshwater wetlands (Grieger et al., 2020). However, these ecosystems are vulnerable to salinization due to sea-level rise, which can have such a significant impact on soil physicochemistry and wetland biota that ecosystem stability and functioning are threatened (Herbert et al., 2015), and ecosystem services such as NO 3 removal may be impaired (Ardón et al., 2013, Larsen et al., 2010. ...