S Andrea Miller's research while affiliated with University of New Brunswick and other places

Publications (5)

Article
Full-text available
Many clients who are not seeking sex therapy experience sexual concerns that affect their overall psychological well-being. However, they may be hesitant to broach them if clinicians do not ask about these issues. The current study assessed a model of how sex education and training affect clinicians' sexual intervention self-efficacy (confidence ad...
Article
The current study explored the sex education and training that clinical and counselling psychologists receive during graduate school, practicum placements and internship. There were 162 psychologists who completed an Internet survey. Although nearly all participants had received some form of education related to sexuality during their graduate trai...
Article
The current study explored whether psychologists are receiving continuing education that may assist them in providing intervention to clients with sexual issues. One hundred and five clinical and counseling psychologists completed an Internet survey. Results suggest that observational opportunities are underutilized and that more training related t...
Article
The current study investigated clinical psychology graduate students' self-efficacy regarding addressing clients' sexual concerns and problems. Students with more sexually liberal attitudes had higher self-efficacy beliefs. Sexuality-specific training experiences but not sexual attitudes or anxiety predicted the amount of sex therapy experience gai...
Article
Full-text available
One hundred and fifty-two heterosexual couples reported their actual and ideal duration of foreplay and intercourse, as well as their perceptions of their partners' desired duration of foreplay and intercourse. Further, participants reported the duration of foreplay and intercourse that they felt most men and most women wanted. Ideal length of fore...

Citations

... Recognizing that social work practitioners are likely to work with clients for whom human sexuality is a presenting problem (Miller & Byers, 2010;Willis et al., 2016); for decades, social work scholars have been calling for the inclusion of content on human sexuality in social work education (Abramowitz, 1971;Chilman, 1975;Dodd & Tolman, 2017). Unfortunately, the majority of social work graduates report that they are not comfortable discussing many issues related to human sexuality (Laverman & Skiba, 2012) and in general report feeling underprepared to engage with service users around issues of sexuality, sex, and sexual health (Logie et al., 2015;Prior et al., 2016). ...
... Researchers have consistent ly shown that young people who have more conservative sexu al beliefs hold more negative attitudes toward a range of sexual behaviours, including same-sex sexual activity, abortion, mas turbation, and treatment of sex offenders ( Fisher, 2020 ;Haidt & Hersh, 2001 ;Rosselli & Jeglic, 2017 ). Sexually conservative indi viduals also have lower self-efficacy to communicate about sex ual topics ( Miller & Byers, 2008 ). Thus, it is likely that more sexually conservative individuals have less positive and more negative attitudes toward sexual consent and are less likely to en gage in sexual consent behaviour. ...
... Aggrawal (2009) notes that a detailed history is essential to classify an individual into a particular class of zoophilic interest, which may pose challenges as individuals may not feel comfortable disclosing stigmatized information to a clinician. Further compounding the issue, many clinicians are uncomfortable asking about sexuality in general (Miller & Byers, 2012) and may be exceptionally uncomfortable openly discussing sexually taboo topics such as sexual interest in, and activity with, animals. As such, these behaviors and any associated stress or issues associated with them may be going undetected and untreated. ...
... Learning from psychologists experienced in this field is particularly useful as they can share their real-world applied knowledge and can offer professional guidance to other psychologists. A quantitative study of 105 clinical and counselling psychologists who were trained in the United States or Canada, revealed that psychologists predominantly relied on peer consultation to upskill their knowledge on sexual issues, including CSA, post university (Miller & Byers, 2009). While peer consultation can be beneficial and is encouraged within the psychology profession, it is important that consultation is with peers who have expertise in CSA (Fagan, 2017;Quanbeck, 2017). ...
... Interestingly, the fact that actual and perceived desire discrepancies differed in these studies implies that-sometimes-one member of the couple must have misperceived his or her partner's level of sexual desire. Consistent with that idea, Miller and Byers (2004) found that women, but not men, significantly underestimated their partners' desired duration of sexual foreplay and intercourse. Although the authors did not evaluate how this misperception impacted sexual or relationship satisfaction, it seems possible that, when an individual's desire is misperceived by their partner, that individual's own level of satisfaction might be impacted. ...