Russell J Corlett's research while affiliated with Victoria University Melbourne and other places

Publications (29)

Article
Full-text available
Background: It has been proposed that hyperperfusion of perforators and distension of anastomotic vessels may be a mechanism by which large perforator flaps are perfused. This study investigates whether increasing perfusion pressure of radiographic contrast in cadaveric studies altered the radiographic appearance of vessels, particularly by disten...
Article
Introduction: Blindness following facial filler procedures, although rare, is devastating, usually acute, permanent, and attributed to an ophthalmic artery embolus. However, blindness may be delayed for up to 2 weeks, sometimes follows injection at remote sites, suggesting alternative pathways and pathogenesis. Methodology: Seeking solutions, fr...
Article
Background: Vascularised composite allo-transplantation (VCA) is emerging as a tailored approach for complex tissue reconstruction. This study focuses on the quadriceps VCA as a potential solution for tissue repair, following trauma, necrotising fasciitis/myositis, or tumor ablation. Methods: Dissections were undertaken in 10 adult cadaveric low...
Article
Introduction: Due to a longstanding controversy over the perfusion reliability of zone IV current this area is routinely discarded despite the mechanism behind zone IV necrosis not being fully understood. The authors review and investigate the vascular anatomy of zone IV with the aim of outlining the reasons for necrosis.Methods: A literature searc...
Article
Background: Most target areas for facial volumization procedures relate to the anatomical location of the facial or ophthalmic artery. Occasionally, inadvertent injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) filler into the arterial circulation occurs, and unrecognised, is irreparably associated with disastrous vascular complications.Of note, the site of compl...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Due to a longstanding controversy over the perfusion reliability of zone IV current this area is routinely discarded despite the mechanism behind zone IV necrosis not being fully understood. The authors review and investigate the vascular anatomy of zone IV with the aim of outlining the reasons for necrosis.Methods: A literature searc...
Article
Background: The angiosome is a three-dimensional block of tissue supplied by a source vessel with its boundary outlined either by an anastomotic perimeter of reduced-caliber choke vessels or by true anastomoses with no reduction of vessel caliber. This article focuses on the role of these anastomotic vessels in defining flap survival or the necrot...
Article
Background: As we enter an age with new approaches to tissue reconstruction, the emphasis on the adage "like for like" has become even more relevant. This study illustrates the potential for several tailored vascularized composite allotransplantation reconstructive techniques and, in particular, for the management of Volkmann contracture. Methods...
Article
Background: The lower limb is a source of many flaps both for closure of local defects and for free transfer. Fasciocutaneous flap techniques have been progressively refined, although the vascular basis for their success needs clarification. Methods: Archival studies of 48 lower limbs were reviewed and combined with 20 studies of lower limbs fro...
Article
Background: There are minimal data in the literature regarding the lymphatic drainage of the conjunctiva and lower eyelid and the relationship with postoperative chemosis and edema. Methods: Injection, microdissection, and histologic and radiologic studies were conducted on 12 hemifacial fresh cadaver specimens. Indocyanine green lymphography wa...
Article
Background: The first successful free vascularized bone flap was performed on June 1, 1974 (and reported in 1975), using the fibula. This was followed by the iliac crest based on the superficial circumflex iliac artery in 1975 and then the deep circumflex iliac artery in 1978. Methods: A total of 384 transfers using fibula (n = 198), iliac crest...
Article
The fascial system of the breast has, to date, only been described in general terms. This anatomical study has developed two distinct methods for better defining existing breast structures such as the inframammary fold, as well as defining previously unnamed ligamentous structures. The authors harvested and examined 40 frozen, entire chest wall cad...
Article
Unlabelled: A refinement over existing static facial sling techniques to reconstruct the nasolabial fold in longstanding facial palsy is presented. The innovative use of fascia lata sheet graft instead of strips facilitates greater intraoperative control over the contour of the reconstructed fold and provides a wide area of attachments of the graf...
Article
Postoperative spinal wound dehiscence is a significant complication following the posterior midline approach. It is postulated that this approach disrupts the vasculature supplying the paraspinal muscles and overlying skin. Although the spinal vasculature has been investigated previously, the smaller arterioles have not been described in the contex...
Article
Full-text available
Mastectomies are one of the most common surgical procedures in women of the developed world. The gracilis myocutaneous flap is favoured by many reconstructive surgeons due to the donor site profile and speed of dissection. The distal component of the longitudinal skin paddle of the gracilis myocutaneous flap is unreliable. This study quantifies the...
Article
Island "perforator flaps" have become state of the art for free-skin flap transfer. Recent articles by Saint-Cyr et al. and Rozen et al. have focused on the anatomical and the clinical territories of individual cutaneous perforating arteries in flap planning, and it is timely to compare this work with our angiosome concept. The angiosome concept, p...
Article
The anterior abdominal wall integument is frequently used in a range of reconstructive flaps. These tissues are supplied by the deep and superficial inferior epigastric arteries (DIEA and SIEAs) and the deep and superficial superior epigastric arteries (DSEA and SSEAs). Previous abdominal wall surgery alters this vascular anatomy and may influence...
Article
The lumbar region has been scarcely explored as a donor site for free tissue transfer or as a free flap recipient site. The lumbar integument provides a versatile prospective flap site, with a potentially well-concealed scar. Similarly, defects of this region can require recipient vessels that may be difficult to identify. Although lumbar artery pe...
Article
The pudendal thigh fasciocutaneous (PTF) flap is a useful flap in perineal reconstruction, that is reliable when small but is traditionally unreliable when large flaps are raised. Large flaps in particular, are associated with an increased incidence of apical necrosis. Thorough descriptions of the vascular anatomy of this flap have been lacking fro...
Article
The previously described "perfusion zones" of the abdominal wall vasculature are based on filling of the deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) and all its branches simultaneously. With the advent of the DIEA perforator flap, only a single or several perforators are included in supply to the flap. As such, a new model for abdominal wall perfusion h...
Article
The lymphatic pathways of the nasal cavity are of enormous clinical importance. To date there has been no accurate radiographic record of these pathways. Four halves of the head and neck from 2 fresh human cadavers were studied. The capillary network arises from the mucous membrane of the atrium, the turbinates, the floor of the nasal cavity, and t...
Article
Perforator flaps frequently rely on small vessels for their supply, which may lead to problems with flap viability. To ensure a more dependable blood supply, larger perforators are sought either on preoperative imaging or intraoperatively. Body weight gain is usually associated with increasing cutaneous perforator size. The question remains whether...
Article
The deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap aims to reduce donor-site morbidity by minimizing rectus muscle damage; however, damage to motor nerves during perforator dissection may denervate rectus muscle. Although cadaveric research has demonstrated that individual nerves do not arise from single spinal cord segments and are not dis...
Article
Lymphatic anatomy has become increasingly clinically important as surgical techniques evolve for investigating and treating cancer metastases. However, due to limited anatomical techniques available, research in this field has been insufficient. The techniques of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) lymphangiography have not been de...
Article
Free tissue transfer has become a safe and reliable means for repairing soft tissue and bony defects of the head and neck. Although operative success has reached 98%, the incidence of significant postoperative complications is also relatively high (32%). One common and significant complication is haematoma formation, occurring at both donor and rec...
Article
Total or subtotal glossectomy following resection of intraoral tumors causes significant morbidity. Recent surgical endeavors have focused on the creation of a neotongue with both sensory and motor innervation. Although various local or regional free flaps have been used for this purpose, the optimal donor site remains undecided. The authors compar...
Article
Abdominal donor-site flaps based on the deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) are the most common flaps used in autologous breast reconstruction. With significant variation in the vascular anatomy of the DIEA, preoperative imaging is desirable. Computed tomographic angiography, recently described for this purpose, uniquely demonstrates the branchi...

Citations

... As described by Taylor and others, the size of the functional angiosome, and hence the AAT, depends on the presence of true anastomoses and the behavior of choke vessels [168,169]. True anastomoses function as permanent connections between adjacent arterial territories or across arteriovenous shunts, effectively increasing the size of the AAT, often dramatically [170]. In contrast, choke vessels tend to restrict access to adjacent arterial territories in a reflexive manner that is thought to be protective, reducing the AAT [171]. ...
... BoNT treatment can induce blepharoptosis by accidentally paralyzing levator palpebrae superioris (LPS) due to inappropriate injection depth, injection outside the safe zone, excessive injection volume or excessive manipulation leading to unintended dispersion. 1 The pathways for BoNT spreading from the superficial brow area to LPS in the superior deep intraorbital compartment are suggested through the weak points of the orbital septum and along the neurovascular pedicles, such as supraorbital and supratrochlear pedicles, through the supraorbital foramen/notch [SOF(N)] and the supratrochlear foramen on the superior part of the medial orbital rim (SMOR). 1 Next, although rare, filler-associated vascular complications, such as blindness, cerebrovascular accidents, and skin necrosis, are devastating and invariably permanent following filler injections in the glabella, inner canthus or nasal bridge. 2 These danger zones are described as a vascular "bag of worms", which are easy targets for vascular compromises. 2 There are some hypotheses proposed for blindness. ...
... A strengthening program should be implemented when lack of strength in the lower limbs and poor pelvis stabilization has been observed and contributes to the patient's problems (36). A lack of muscle activation during Table 2 Recommended treatment interventions for ischiofemoral impingement ...
... The basic idea is that the safe clinical vascular territory of a cutaneous perforator, used for example for a flap, extends beyond the anatomical territory of that perforator to include the anatomical territory of the adjacent cutaneous perforator, but if further territories are used, the risk of necrosis increases. [34][35][36] An example of this is the above-mentioned transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap. In 1983 plastic surgeons Michael Scheflan and Melvyn Dinner published a paper where they showed, based on anatomical studies, that there is a communication between the perforators that supply the skin over the flap. ...
... 9 Intraarterial soft tissue filler embolus have been reported in all branches of the facial and ophthalmic artery which supports the evidence that no region of the face is risk free. 46 Vascular complications usually have cutaneous involvement but can extend to the subcutaneous fat, muscle, deep fat, tendons and even bone if unresolved, with potential for life altering consequences including tissue ischemia and loss, visual loss, pulmonary embolization, and stroke. 15,47 Vascular complications represent different risks associated with variation in arterial distribution patterns. ...
... Additionally, the growing knowledge of flap physiology has contributed significantly to our capabilities. The remarkable work of G. Ian Taylor et al. on the "Angiosome Concept and Tissue transfer" represents a milestone in reconstructive innovation [10,11]. ...
... Anatomic studies had shown that the anastomosis between the oblique and transverse branches of the perforators in the lower leg was dominated by the choke vessel [28]. The sural flap is one of the axis flaps, as the long axis of the flap is consistent with the axis of the blood vessel, which is conducive to the survival of the flap. ...
... Together, these anatomic qualities of the infraorbital region make a complete knowledge of anatomy and proper injection technique and products for this area critical for safe injection with less side effects and demand the skill set of an experienced injector. [4][5][6] However, even with the above-listed criteria satisfied, side effects (swelling in particular) are relatively common, especially over time, and must be discussed with patients before treatment so they can be managed appropriately. In fact, in a retrospective review by the author, 7 the rate of patient-reported short-term swelling after infraorbital hollow (IOH) treatment with a 27-gauge cannula was 51% and long-term swelling, while less frequent, still occurred at a rate of about 19% as rated by trained evaluators counting even minimal swelling not noticeable to patients. ...
... A computer vision to recognize human face and excavate the data from it, 2. Statistical methods to remove unnecessary data and analyze the temperature of raw skin, 3. Machine learning methods such as random forest classification for developing personal comfort prediction models and record unique facial features. The main reason they chose facial skin temperature as their targeted bio-signal is that human face has a higher density of blood vessels compared to other surfaces which leads to a larger skin temperature variation [41]. The second reason for choosing face was the fact that human faces are not covered by pieces of clothing -separate from special conditions-and besides easier recognition, the transferred infrared energy can be directly analyzed by the thermal camera. ...
... Реконструкции в этой анатомической зоне, как правило, имеют следующие цели: • восстановить черты лица; • обеспечить орбитальную поддержку; • разобщить основание черепа и носовую и ротовую полости. В литературе описывается большое количество методик замещения дефектов орбиты и параорбитальной зоны с использованием реваскуляризированных и нереваскуляризированных костных лоскутов, мягких тканей и имплантатов, таких как титановая сетка и пористый полиэтилен [9][10][11][12][13]. ...