Rosemary Walker's research while affiliated with University of Waterloo and other places

Publications (5)

Article
Situated in central-eastern Canada, Ontario is the largest province with a population of 11 million. Ontario is considered a fairly rich province at the centre of Canada's manufacturing and financial sectors. Public health services in Ontario are primarily delivered through public health departments, each administered by a local board of health and...
Article
In this article, the development of a system for collecting and assessing best community-based health promotion practices for dissemination is described. The key system components are (a) a protocol for identifying meritorious practices, (b) criteria for assessing those practices, and (c) an assessment procedure. A key informant process was used to...
Article
Over 60 per cent of adults have at least one modifiable cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor. Community-based initiatives are a central component of a population-based CVD risk reduction strategy. Describes the development of an information system in which CHHIOP collected quantitative and qualitative information on heart health activities in c...
Article
This paper presents the results of a survey conducted with representatives (n = 283) of community health agencies linked to heart health activity in Ontario in order to: 1) describe their levels of involvement in heart health promotion, 2) describe the nature and extent of partnering undertaken in the context of community-based heart health promoti...
Article
Full-text available
Community-based heart health promotion is viewed as an effective means of reducing cardiovascular disease risk. Although public health agencies have a central role in the implementation and dissemination of heart health programmes, their effectiveness is being challenged by major structural changes to Provincial public health systems across Canada,...

Citations

... Literature review and detailed analysis of various good practices' databases in public health and health promotion addressed to older people shows that the key criteria taken into account by experts evaluating health programmes are as follows: effectiveness, impact, feasibility, transferability, sustainability, social participation, cooperation and engagement of numerous stakeholders and the evaluation process (Baker, Brennan Ramirez, Clause, & Land, 2008;Broesskamp-Stone & Ackerman, 2010;Cameron, Jolin, Walker, McDermott, & Gough, 2001;European Commission, 2017;WHO, 2001;Flay et al., 2005;Ng & Colombani, 2015;Windsor, 2015). ...
... The Cana dian Heart Health Initiative (CHHI) is one such ex ample. The CHHI incorporates existing structures at both the provincial and community level to meet in formational needs for public interventions for heart health (Cameron, Walker, Gough, & McDonald, 2000). Another example would be the early detection and fostering of global collaboration that was made possible by ICT throughout the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) epidemic (Eysenbach, 2003). ...
... Seven categories were established for potential municipal roles, responsibilities and activities to reduce population health inequities (Table 2). In the Canadian context, categories 1 and 2 deal with assessing health and social needs and delivering health-based services -assessments and service delivery that might typically fall outside the range and jurisdiction of municipal services [95,130]. Categories 3 through 6 deal with relationships between the municipality and other governments, non-governmental organizations, and within the municipality itself [84] , while category 7 captures the types of responsibilities over which Canadian municipalities have clear existing jurisdiction, such as zoning, by-law enforcement, public libraries, and fire protection [68]. ...
... This survey is described in detail elsewhere (Elliott et al., 2000). The main focus of the survey was on agency involvement in heart health promotion activities and partnerships for these activities. ...
... It started by creating a policy context for action (phase 1), then did provincial heart health surveys to motivate action (phase 2), then moved to demonstrating the feasibility of implementing a partnership and public health approach (phase 3), then to evaluating lessons from these demonstrations (phase 4), and lastly to focusing on the capacities required to disseminate good practices and to integrate them into existing institutions (phase 5). [6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15] Beyond these five phases, a deployment phase was envisioned but did not materialize (for reasons described later). See Table 1 for a more detailed description of the five phases. ...