Rosa E. Guzzardo Tamargo's research while affiliated with University of Puerto Rico at Rio Piedras and other places

Publications (19)

Article
Full-text available
Language processing is cognitively demanding, requiring attentional resources to efficiently select and extract linguistic information as utterances unfold. Previous research has associated changes in pupil size with increased attentional effort. However, it is unknown whether the behavioral ecology of speakers may differentially affect engagement...
Article
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Most studies on lexical priming have examined single words presented in isolation, despite language users rarely encountering words in such cases. The present study builds upon this by examining both within-language identity priming and across-language translation priming in sentential contexts. Highly proficient Spanish–English bilinguals read sen...
Article
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Objective The process of reflexivity is used to critically examine the experience of conducting qualitative research with functionally diverse older adults in a post disaster context. Methods The design of the study began with an interpretative phenomenological framework, using in-depth interviews. Fifteen individuals with functional and access ne...
Article
Proficient bilinguals use two languages actively, but the contexts in which they do so may differ dramatically. The present study asked what consequences the contexts of language use hold for the way in which cognitive resources modulate language abilities. Three groups of speakers were compared, all of whom were highly proficient Spanish-English b...
Article
This study examines Puerto Rican bilinguals’ attitudes towards five speech varieties (Spanish, English, Spanish with English lexical insertions, inter-sentential code-switching, and intra-sentential code-switching). While previous research on language attitudes in Puerto Rico has exclusively employed direct methods (i.e. interviews, surveys, questi...
Article
Researchers who study code-switching using lab-based approaches face a series of methodological challenges; these include, but are not limited to, using adequate techniques and tasks that allow for processing that reflects real-language usage and selecting stimuli that reflect the participants’ code-switching community norms. We present two illustr...
Article
Full-text available
We employ code-switching (the alternation of two languages in bilingual communication) to test the hypothesis, derived from experience-based models of processing (e.g., Boland, Tanenhaus, Carlson, & Garnsey, 1989; Gennari & MacDonald, 2009), that bilinguals are sensitive to the combinatorial distributional patterns derived from production and that...
Article
In a recent study, Lew-Williams and Fernald (2007) showed that native Spanish speakers use grammatical gender information encoded in Spanish articles to facilitate the processing of upcoming nouns. In this article, we report the results of a study investigating whether grammatical gender facilitates noun recognition during second language (L2) proc...

Citations

... However, there is increasing recognition that open science practices should equally apply to qualitative research. In fact, some of the fundamental principles of qualitative research lend themselves directly to open science (Humphreys, Lewis, Sender, & Won, 2021), such as the principle of reflexivity, that is, researchers acknowledging their fundamental role in the research and data generation process (Guzzardo et al., 2021). This highlights need for maximum transparency when it comes to making such acknowledgements, and the need to provide sufficient supporting evidence. ...
... Converging evidence indicates that bilinguals manage such demands in part by drawing from domain-general control processes (e.g. Abutalebi et al., 2008;Baum & Titone, 2014;Beatty-Martínez et al., 2020;Linck et al., 2008;Pivneva et al., 2012). Thus, an important source of variability in bilingual speakers may lie in their ability to manage the accessibility of their two languages. ...
... As alluded to earlier, we propose that the way in which bilinguals draw on attentional resources associated with language control will depend on bilinguals' habits of language use and the control demands of their interactional context 9,10,17,21 . To this end, we focus on Spanish-English bilinguals from Puerto Rico, a predominantly Spanish-speaking environment but where English is loosely supported with little-to-no interactional cost and where codeswitching is very common 12,17,44 . Codeswitching experience sits on a continuum that is influenced by conventionalized communicative norms 12,21,45,46 but also varies according to sociodemographic and individual characteristics 47 . ...
... Nonetheless, all these research projects focus on the I-language of CS. It is possible that part of CS competence, including acceptable switch junctures, the I-language of CS, is acquired through the acquisition of the syntax of both grammars (Giancaspro 2013(Giancaspro , 2015Guzzardo Tamargo and Dussias 2013;Lipski 2014;Potowski and Bolyanatz 2012;Toribio 2001), while some CS practices may be acquired socially, i.e., those related to the E-language (Torres Cacoullos and Travis 2016). Parafita Couto et al. (2021, p. 17) indicate in their review of several CS structures that have been widely examined, including the masculine default in Det-N switches and the use of bilingual compound verbs, that 'These findings strongly suggest that asymmetries are due to extralinguistic factors, such as community norms, rather than structural properties of the participating languages'. ...
... This paper investigates the cognitive load in processing habitual and nonhabitual Cantonese-English code-switching in Hong Kong using a sentence reading task with an eye-tracking method. Eye tracking provides an ecologically valid method of collecting data during comprehension (Valdés Kroff et al. 2018). The eye-tracking data include what spot participants are looking at, for how long they are looking at it ("fixation") and the movement between each fixation ("saccade"). ...
... The knowledge we have today of estar switches in Spanish/English CS primarily comes either from descriptive sources (e.g., Lipski, 1978;Pfaff, 1979;Poplack, 1980;Reyes, 1982), or more recently, from psycholinguistic studies that examine the processing cost of bilingual verbs in online comprehension (e.g., Guzzardo Tamargo, 2012;Guzzardo Tamargo & Dussias, 2017;Guzzardo Tamargo, Valdés Kroff & Dussias, 2016;Halberstadt, 2017). There are only a couple of studies to our knowledge that focus on the analysis of these constructions in oral production. ...
... Conversely, translanguaging ideology honors bilingualism (Mazak, 2016). Translanguaging, common in bilingual continua (Hornberger & Link, 2012), relates to language ideology because people adopt or contest normative language beliefs and practices (Anzaldúa, 2007), such as bracketing, while others have varying degrees of awareness (Kroskrity, 2004). ...
... both are inseparable processes, with shared and indivisible operations and representations (Meyer et al., 2016). Although there is no empirical evidence demonstrating that reading and writing are separable and independent processes, there is strong evidence showing the confluence of reading comprehension and writing production (Buz et al., 2016;Fricke et al., 2016;Guzzardo Tamargo et al., 2016;Hsiao & MacDonald, 2016;Kittredge & Dell, 2016;Zamuner et al., 2016). ...
... Several studies have suggested that L2 learners do not anticipate the upcoming arguments to the same extent as native speakers do [53][54][55]. This does not necessarily mean they exhibit a lack of lexical semantics because the present study participants were highly pro cient. ...