Roland Sintos Coloma's research while affiliated with Wayne State University and other places

Publications (29)

Article
This commentary is an edited transcription of a historic and dynamic discussion on “Reckoning with Anti-Asian Violence” among a distinguished panel of elected legislators, community leaders, and academic researchers. This discussion took place virtually as a presidential session during the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Associa...
Article
This essay – written autobiographically as a confession – charts uncomfortably and reflexively salient experiences and emotions of a queer educator of color. It unveils and analyzes unresolved feelings as messy examples in his journey as an urban school teacher, as a graduate student, and eventually as a university academic and administrator. In pa...
Article
Drawing insights primarily from Ethnic Studies, this essay is broken into the following components: outlining the elusive task of defining urban; delineating three decolonizing moves in relation to representation, structure, and affect; and ending with the ongoing struggles for Ethnic Studies in PK-12 schools and higher education. The goal is to sh...
Article
This paper examines how ageing transmigrants engage in practises that serve to decolonise life course in order to create increased opportunities to live well. It analyses the experiences of Jamaican Canadian older adult (age 60 and older) who decided to remain in Canada, return to Jamaica, or travel between countries after retirement. As transmigra...
Article
Purpose This article will analyze the relationship between theory and history, or more specifically the role and use of theory in the field of history of education. It will explore the following questions: What is theory, and what is it for? How do historians and, in particular, historians of education construe and use theory? And how do they resp...
Article
This article argues that a queer perspective on Asian Canadian studies can open new inquiries and simultaneously trouble the centrality of family, generation, and community in documenting and examining racialized minority and diasporic groups. By rethinking these analytical concepts through queer possibilities and interventions, research into Asian...
Article
AESA President-elect Roland Sintos Coloma (Northern Kentucky University) and the 2018 Program Committee are pleased to announce the theme for the 2018 Annual Meeting.
Article
If knowledge production is indelibly central to curriculum inquiry, then a critical investigation into the conditions of racialized minority and diasporic subjects in general and of Filipina/os in particular can shed light on the intersection of curriculum, empire, and global migration, a topic which has received relatively little attention in curr...
Article
In this article Roland Sintos Coloma argues for the relevance of empire as an analytical category in educational research. He points out the silence in mainstream studies of education on the subject of empire, the various interpretive approaches to deploying empire as an analytic, and the importance of indigeneity in research on empire and educatio...
Article
This article examines the political and educational activism of Ladlad, the first lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) political party in the Philippines and the only existing LGBT political party in the world. Founded in 2003, Ladlad fielded candidates for the 2010 national election in the Philippines, amidst seemingly insurmountable ins...
Book
The Philippines became Canada’s largest source of short-and long-term migrants in 2010, surpassing China and India, both of which are more than ten times larger. The fourth-largest racialized minority group in the country, the Filipino community is frequently understood by such figures as the victimized nanny, the selfless nurse, and the gangster y...
Article
This article examines the colonial encounters of gender, race and sexuality in the United States and the Philippines in the early 1900s. It traces the anxieties over US men's moral degeneracy and the representation of Filipinas as libidinal temptations, which mobilised US women's active participation in colonial biopolitics and governmentality. It...
Chapter
Asian Canadians are the largest visible minority community in Canada, yet they remain at the peripheries of scholarly, policy, and educational discussions.1 According to Statistics Canada, there are over 3.5 million Canadians of Asian descent in 2006, constituting about 11 percent of the nationalpopulation. Based on projections by Statistics Canada...
Article
According to historian-philosopher Michel Foucault, “Each society has its regime of truth, its ‘general politics' of truth: that is, the types of discourse which it accepts and makes function as true; the mechanisms and instances which enable one to distinguish true and false statements, the means by which each is sanctioned; the techniques and pro...
Article
The article brings together the fields of curriculum studies, history of education, and ethnic studies to chart a transnational history of race, empire, and curriculum. Drawing from a larger study on the history of education in the Philippines under U.S. rule in the early 1900s, it argues that race played a pivotal role in the discursive constructi...
Article
Drawing on my research experiences as a Filipino American historian, this article explores what Michel Foucault calls ‘subjectification’, the dialectial process of self‐making and being‐made, within the context of ethnic identities and transnational projects. Engaging the work of feminists of color in particular, it outlines three types of subject...
Article
Using Stuart Hall’s concept of articulation, which sutures seemingly incongruent analytics, this article juxtaposes queer theorizing and postcolonial projects in order to contribute to the examinations of empire, education and decolonization. It foregrounds the queer approaches of working within, through and beyond the framework of sexuality to inv...
Article
The introduction frames the state of the educational research on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) within two contexts—historical and conceptual—in order to develop intellectual and political paradigms that address their specific needs and interests. The historical section illustrates how the varying political status of AAPIs as immigra...
Chapter
Representing the state of Illinois at a Midwest inter-normal oratorical competition on May 8, 1908, the 19-year-old Camilo Osias began his speech “The Aspiration of the Filipinos” with the phrase: “All nations and individuals love liberty and independence; they hate servitude and restraint” (Osias 1908). Ten years after the United States gained con...

Citations

... One inconspicuous yet powerful form of epistemic oppression is epistemicide, which refers to the "killing of knowledge systems" through the erasure of non-Western ways of knowing (26). The historical theft and cooptation of non-Western knowledge systems has implications for today's prospective knowledge makers (3,27). That is, when students of color are deprived from knowing "how autonomous, resourceful, and abundant their We use "Latine" to refer to people with ancestral ties to the region now known as Latin America. ...
... As an Indigenous person, it is my obligation to share about the racialized and languaged experiences of Maya and other Indigenous migrants in educational settings. I do this to disrupt the epistemological indifference much too common in urban education scholarship towards Indigenous students (Coloma, 2020) in general, and Indigenous migrants from Abya Yala in particular . Such epistemological indifference is a violent continuation of colonial logics of Indigenous erasure foundational to Guatemala, Mexico, and the U.S. It is my hope that the following findings shed light into Tonio, Juan, and Alan's racialized and languaged experiences and serve as a catalyst for future research on Maya, Nahua, and other recently arrived Indigenous migrant youth from Abya Yala in U.S. urban schools. ...
... Critical transnationalism assists in the animation and interrogation of Cambodian Canadians' negotiation with the national, for example, policies flowing from the multiculturalism of difference such as adult education geared towards newcomers, and the transnational, for example, their mobile itineraries and minutiae of their everyday lives within their communities (Ezra & Rowden, 2006;Hepburn, 2019;Hepburn & Coloma, 2019). The perspective is attentive to questions of politics, and power, and how these may, in turn, uncover new forms of neocolonialist practices in settlement practices. ...
... Thirdly, it is necessary to elaborate adequate criteria to correlate educational past events and present. In order to establish succession links between educational ideas form the past with current pedagogical traditions and systems, it is important to link it to the corresponding ideology, religion, philosophy, psychological tradition, not to forget historical époque and culture (Coloma, 2018). Such identification could be implemented via finding the similarity between the researched problems of the present and the past and between different cultures (Fuchs & Vera, 2019) via revealing the coinciding elements in pedagogical positions, via establishing the same types of pedagogical aims, ways, methods, tools of the past and the present. ...
... Instead, as we underscored in our introduction, formations of global citizenship require an analytic that deals with the construction of the Black subject as slave/nonbeing traced back to 1492 and the transatlantic slave trade, as well as its afterlife. Doing so stimulates an alternative discussion that is more specific about naming racism, empire, coloniality, and the role of world systems of domination in educational contextualizations of global citizenship (Coloma, 2017;Díaz Beltrán, 2017;Dozono, 2020;J. E. King, 1992J. ...
... Having laid out a basic introduction to these texts, and their Asian characters, we consider the way that race complicates these stories, and we begin from our understanding that Asian people in North America are under theorized, and their lives are taken less seriously in and outside of the academy. 43 The sites of conflict in these young women's lives are entirely reversed: for Courtney, conflict is manifested-sometimes by herself-at school, while her home life is relatively stable: she has two white, gay dads in the show, who are depicted as caring, involved parents. While for Skim, the school is one site of conflict, though her struggle is also internal to both herself and her home. ...
... In these situations, many settlement workers voiced disappointment as they felt the negative consequences for the student and their families: they cannot provide quality services and genuine support since they have not established rapport and relationship with the student prior to the emergence of the student's issue. Drawing from McElhinny et al. (2012), this spotlighting of (racialized) bodies only when there is a perceived issue constitutes the ways in which racialized bodies become hypervisible in ways that reaffirm perceptions of racial deficits and crises. Hence, in this experience of settlement workers, their racial embodiments become hypervisible, as their capacities and roles are seen as good and useful only in certain situations, such as in "fixing" immigrant problems, thereby limiting the discursive and spatial terrain of what they can and cannot do. ...
... To put it differently, instilling in prospective teachers the ability and willingness to work effectively in a multicultural setting, such as Ethiopia, requires active participation of the entire campus community, such as administrators, teacher educators and prospective teachers of the program (see Article III; Egne, under review). This is because teacher education program administrators and teacher educators in particular have decisive authority over the curriculum, instruction, and assessment activities that are applied in a teacher education program (Coloma, 2008). This may imply that teacher education institutions serve as vehicles not only for preserving but also for reproducing in a fair way the cultural values and perspectives of their diverse students (Apple, 2004). ...
... LGBTQ activists wade through political opportunities, resources, and ideologies (Chua, 2014;Coloma, 2013;Prado and Machado, 2014;Soriano, 2014). Political opportunities refer to openings for participation (Tarrow, 2011). ...
... These include the development of history of education research in national and international settings (see, for example, Bruno-Jofré, 2014;Dekker & Simon, 2014;Lindmark, 2015) and the philosophical and epistemological foundations of history of education research, including questions of presentism and objectivity (Depaepe, 1997;Popkewitz, 2018). I will also only touch upon the questions of theory and method in educational history (Kaestle, 2000;McCulloch & Watts, 2003;Rury & Tamura, 2019, pp. 48-80), and the challenges that this research field has and will face (Goodman & Grosvenor, 2009;Jarausch, 1986). ...