Roger Guevara's research while affiliated with Instituto Nacional de Ecología and other places

Publications (17)

Article
Full-text available
Diverse tools and approaches are currently utilized to propose conservation strategies for ecosystems, areas and individual taxa. Here, ecological niche-based modeling, identification of areas of endemism, and diverse methods to determine conservation status are carried out to detect endangered species in Selenicereus. This genus in the Cactaceae h...
Article
Full-text available
Empirical evidence has shown that introduced honeybees, Apis mellifera L., can change the structural organization of ecological networks involving pollinators and flowering plants. In this case, studies have shown that A. mellifera is highly connected within networks (i.e., high interactive role) mainly due to its high abundances, long colony lifet...
Article
How ecological interactions vary across spatial and environmental gradients has received increasing attention in recent years, contributing to the revelation of the drivers of biodiversity. However, it is still unclear how the structure of ecological interactions varies across large spatial scales and which climatic factors are associated with such...
Article
Closely related species tend to be more similar than randomly selected species from the same phylogenetic tree. This pattern, known as a phylogenetic signal, has been extensively studied for intrinsic (e.g. morphology), as well as extrinsic (e.g. climatic preferences), properties but less so for ecological interactions. Phylogenetic signals of spec...
Article
Biological invasions are a growing threat to biodiversity. The control and eradication of exotic species established in earnest are of limited success despite high financial investments. Anticipating biological invasions based on species’ suitabilities is a cost-effective strategy given it helps identifying areas where exotic species can prosper, w...
Article
Rhizosphere processes are critical for nutrient cycling, maintaining soil quality and sustaining plant growth and productivity. However, our understanding of the interplay between plant roots and other soil ecosystem engineers such as earthworms is still limited. Our objective was to determine the influence of Pontoscolex corethrurus, a common endo...
Article
Full-text available
The impact of storms on coastal dunes and beaches and the effects they induce in topography and plant communities are natural processes that contribute to maintaining natural coastal dynamics. However, because coasts are often densely populated, these phenomena are perceived as major threats to human property. To protect human assets sustainably, n...
Article
How much leaf area do insects eat? A data set of insect herbivory sampled globally with a standardized protocol. Ecology 102(4): Abstract. Herbivory is ubiquitous. Despite being a potential driver of plant distribution and performance, herbivory remains largely undocumented. Some early attempts have been made to review, globally, how much leaf area...
Article
Herbivory is ubiquitous. Despite being a potential driver of plant distribution and performance, herbivory remains largely undocumented. Some early attempts have been made to review, globally, how much leaf area is removed through insect feeding. Kozlov et al. (2015), in one of the most comprehensive reviews regarding global patterns of herbivory,...
Article
Aim Exceptions to the quasi‐ubiquitous latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG) have been poorly studied. A reverse LDG, when species richness (SR) increases away from the Equator, has been suggested for several taxa and entire biomes. The Neotropical seasonally dry tropical forests (SDTF) are a well‐known example of a reverse LDG that could be caused...
Article
A set of species, not linked by close ancestry, with similar functional responses to selective pressures, is known as a functional group or response syndrome. Some studies have investigated antiherbivore plant defenses in the context of defense syndromes, with contrasting results. We analyze how the assembly of leaf-functional traits and wood densi...
Article
Nestedness is widely observed in natural metacommunities, but its underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. The distribution of habitats in the landscape and differences in dispersal rates of distinct insect taxa can determine the nestedness of the metacommunity. Here, we evaluated how species habitat specialization contributes to metacomm...
Article
A team of 79 scientists from more than 50 institutions partnered to gather all available information regarding Mexican ants since 1894, the year in which the first geographical record of an ant is known for the country. In this new study, including more than 21,000 records, we showed that there are ~900 species of ants in Mexico, which are distribu...
Article
Full-text available
A team of 79 scientists from more than 50 institutions partnered to gather all available information regarding Mexican ants since 1894, the year in which the first geographical record of an ant is known for the country. In this new study, including more than 21,000 records, we showed that there are ~900 species of ants in Mexico, which are distribu...
Article
A team of 79 scientists from more than 50 institutions partnered to gather all available information regarding Mexican ants since 1894, the year in which the first geographical record of an ant is known for the country. In this new study, including more than 21,000 records, we showed that there are ~900 species of ants in Mexico, which are distribu...

Citations

... The concept of ecological niche was proposed and refined by Johnson and Grinnell [1,2]; it emphasizes the survival environmental requirements across the geographic distribution of species [3,4] and the interactions between communities [5]. As research progressed, the ecological niche gradually developed from a functional definition to a geometric one of the environmental capacity or ecological space occupied by a species [6]. ...
... In general, we postulated that the impact of A. mellifera on the organization of pollination networks should be positively correlated with its interactive role within such networks. This is because Cruz et al. [37] recently showed that A. mellifera has a highly interactive role in global pollination networks. However, this role varies geographically and is shaped by environmental (e.g., temperature and precipitation) and anthropogenic factors (e.g., disturbance). ...
... The impact of humans on plant communities has been documented in the scientific literature [21][22][23]. According to Falcão et al. [21], human impacts, such as land use and habitat disturbance, can affect species composition and drive plant invasiveness. ...
... These systems are influenced by and count on interactions developed in the rhizosphere at the interface between root and soil that is under the direct influence of root exudates. This is also a zone of intense microbial activity, concentration, and diversity [10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17]. ...
... This is caused by increased wave breaking as a result of eroded sand that nourishes the foreshore bathymetry during storm action. In contrast, higher elevated dunes form a barrier to potentially shield the adjacent hinterland from elevated water level and flooding (Keijsers et al., 2015;Maximiliano-Cordova et al., 2021;Van IJzendoorn et al., 2021;Figlus, 2022;Miocic et al., 2022). Furthermore, coastal dunes show a natural capacity for self-repair and post-storm recovery under favorable conditions (Gracia et al., 2018). ...
... The substantial contribution of belowground herbivory to shaping ecosystem structure and functions is widely appreciated (Blossey and Hunt-Joshi, 2003;Johnson and Murray, 2008). Nevertheless, the levels of root herbivory in natural ecosystems remain practically undetermined (Hunter, 2008), in contrast to the thousands of published estimates of leaf area losses to insects (Turcotte et al., 2014;Kozlov et al., 2015;Mendes et al., 2021). Most importantly, nothing is apparently known regarding the geographic and/or climatic variations in belowground herbivory, as we have been unable to identify any study addressing root losses to insects along latitudinal gradients (Zvereva and Kozlov, 2021). ...
... We sampled branches from the outer part of the crown of all species; for that, we used a slingshot-like apparatus to throw a rope in the selected branch and then bring it down for sampling. We collected the first 50 leaves from the base to the apex of each branch (according to the standardized protocol of Mendes et al., 2021). Leaves were taken to the laboratory, scanned and had their margins or limb completed to account for leaf area loss to herbivores using the software GIMP. ...
... Earlier research determined that there are considerable potential suitable areas for the species with edible fruits such as S. costaricensis, S. ocamponis and S. undatus. Additionally, they may extend their ranges depending on future scenarios of climate change (Sosa et al. 2020). Our field work, however, identified species with very restricted distributions that have not yet been studied and occupy coastal and seasonally tropical dry forests. ...
... Such generalists serve as keystone species for the persistence of the network (Vanparys et al., 2008, Pasquaretta et al., 2017, Dalsgaard et al., 2021. These generalist species contribute the most to nestedness and serve as network hubs, module hubs and connectors in the network, and tend to be the most abundant in the community (Watts et al., 2016, Neves et al., 2021. Native Apis cerana and alien A. mellifera served as super-generalist pollinators in the network and thus have a high contribution to the network. ...