Robert S. Young's research while affiliated with Western Carolina University and other places

Publications (10)

Article
The hurricane hit the Mississippi coast head on. Orrin Pilkey immediately rushed to Waveland to bail out his parents whose house was 4 blocks back from the Gulf of Mexico. Their house had been flooded up to the 5-foot level and a half dozen trees had crashed through the roof Some neighboring houses were now piles of broken boards and glass. But the...
Article
A reef monitoring program off Roatan, Bay islands, Honduras has produced base line data for platform bathymetry, major macrofauna distribution, and sediment attributes. Because erosion accompanying accelerated island development will be increasing in the near future, measurements of total suspended solids and sedimentation rate were made. Results s...
Article
Dr. David M. Bush is Assistant Professor in the Department of Geosciences at the State University of West Georgia in Carrollton, GA. Dr. Bush received his BS in Geology from the State University of New York, College at Oneonta, and both his MS and PhD in Geology from Duke University. His graduate research focused on the sediments and storm processe...
Article
Full-text available
Leatherman et al. [2000] (Eos, Trans., AGU, February 8, 2000, p.55) affirm that global eustatic sea-level rise is driving coastal erosion. Furthermore, they argue that the long-term average rate of shoreline retreat is 150 times the rate of sea-level rise. This rate, they say, is more than a magnitude greater than would be expected from a simple re...
Article
Full-text available
Geoindicators provide a management tool for rapid assessment of natural hazard risk potential, either as a supplement to long-term environmental auditing and monitoring, or for initial coastal assessment as in developing countries. Using examples of barrier island and bluffed coasts, indicators of process/response are examined regionally, locally,...
Article
This study examines the Holocene history of a glacially-sculpted Maine embayment using both geological and archaeological data bases. High-resolution seismic profiling, in combination with vibracores and Holocene sea-level curves, were used to develop the Holocene stratigraphy and paleogeographic evolution of Johns Bay and Pemaquid Beach, Maine. Th...

Citations

... At the Ancão Peninsula, breaching occurs close to the migrating inlet area through a process known as jump migration (i.e. new inlet opens updrift or downdrift under high energy conditions (Vila--Concejo et al., 2006;Pilkey and Young, 2005;Popesso et al., 2016)). Breaching occurred in sector 10 during the storm season of 2005. ...
... Being buried under the sand carried by harsh winds is another situation that makes it difficult for plants to survive on dunes [5,[13][14][15][16][17][18]. Harsh winds and storms also cause damage to plants by blasting them with sand, uprooting them, shredding their leaves or uncovering their roots [19,12]. When moved farther inland from coastal areas, the effect of sand transport and salt spray decreases, and the amount of organic matter and nitrogen increases [5,20]. ...
... Mangroves hold the shoreline in place, and can o!er protection from waves and wind, as was well illustrated during Hurricane Andrew in south Florida [24]. Although these areas are often accreting, they are not safe for development and erode very rapidly when destabilized by the death or arti"cial removal of the mangroves. ...
... Coastal barrier spits and islands, which comprise approximately 10% of the world's coastline [1], are dynamic landforms that are impacted by storms and sea-level rise. Debate exists regarding the impacts of sea-level rise on shoreline change and barrier migration [2][3][4][5][6]. Over the millennia, sea-level rise and storms certainly drove the migration of shorelines across the continental shelf during the Holocene [5,7]. ...
... It was found (Figure 4) that the frequency of SW sea storm events is increasing in the study area and, through the bi-dimensional models to calculate the flood sea level and map the floodable surfaces, that the coastal spaces are more easily flooded as the coastal slope decreases (R2 = 0.5885) (Figure 8, right). This pattern has been widely reported in the scientific literature, showing that zones of lower height and slope are the most affected [61][62][63][64][65]. It was also found through the DoDs obtained from the LiDAR data (2009 and 2015) that the erosion range increases with flooded area measured through the length of the transects explained in the methodology section (R2 = 0.6872) (Figure 8, left). ...
... These reefs begin immediately offshore and extend approximately 700 m towards the open ocean (Gonzalez, 2013). Coral reefs in West Bay and West End are classified as having a highly diverse back reef and a fore reef that primarily consists of sand, sponges, and gorgonians (Mehrtens et al., 2001). ...