Robert A. Hanneman's research while affiliated with University of California, Riverside and other places

Publications (36)

Article
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Using randomly ordered name generators, we tested the effect of name generators’ relative position on the likelihood of respondents’ declining to respond or satisficing in their response. An online survey of public health staff elicited names of information sources, information seekers, perceived experts, and friends. Results show that when name ge...
Article
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Background Workforce development is an important aspect of evidence-informed decision making (EIDM) interventions. The social position of individuals in formal and informal social networks, and the relevance of formal roles in relation to EIDM are important factors identifying key EIDM players in public health organizations. We assessed the role of...
Article
Full-text available
Background Workforce development is an important aspect of evidence-informed decision making (EIDM) interventions. The structure of formal and informal social networks can influence, and be influenced, by the implementation of EIDM interventions. Methods In a mixed methods study we assessed the outcomes of a targeted training intervention to promot...
Article
Content: Humans are fundamentally social beings. The social systems within which we live our lives (families, schools, workplaces, professions, friendship groups) have a significant influence on our health, success and well-being. These groups can be characterised as networks and analysed using social network analysis. Social network analysis: S...
Article
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Web and mobile (mHealth) interventions have promise for improving health outcomes, but engagement and attrition may be reducing effect sizes. Because social networks can improve engagement, which is a key mechanism of action, understanding the structure and potential impact of social networks could be key to improving mHealth effects. This study (a...
Article
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Background We studied the evolution of information-seeking networks over a 2-year period during which an organization-wide intervention was implemented to promote evidence-informed decision-making (EIDM) in three public health units in Ontario, Canada. We tested whether engagement of staff in the intervention and their EIDM behavior were associate...
Chapter
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This study investigates one of the major challenges in analysis of social networks: the identification of key nodes or important actors. There are numerous algorithms and approaches to locating and ranking nodes that may be critical in processes such as influence and diffusion. Most of the current algorithms consider a single criterion like the deg...
Article
An optimization approach is taken to locating the optimal set of initial contacts in a social network to maximize the number of total network members reached by a message. It is assumed that initial contacts are costly and that the number of initial contacts must be minimized simultaneously with maximizing the total number of network members contac...
Article
The prestige ranks of 110 U.S. Ph.D. programs in Sociology are examined at seven times between 1976 and 2011. Linear latent growth curve models are fitted to test differences between public and private institutions, institutions located in the four major census regions, and between three historically strong communities (the Ivy League, Big-10, and...
Article
We present a new criterion function for blockmodeling two-way two-mode relation matrices when the number of blocks as well as the equivalence relation are unknown. For this, we specify a measure of fit based on data compression theory, which allows for the comparison of blockmodels of different sizes and block types from different equivalence relat...
Article
We think of the kibbutz as a place for communal living and working. Members work, reside, and eat together, and share income "from each according to ability, to each according to need." But in the late 1980s the kibbutzim decided that they needed to change. Reforms--moderate at first--were put in place. Members could work outside of the organizatio...
Article
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Building on world-systems theory, simulation models of 5-line intersocietal networks were generated in an effort to understand systemic power hierarchies. The societal nodes were exclusively connected by three types of interaction: migration, warfare, and unequal trade. These networks can be considered "mixed relation" networks due to the ways in w...
Article
This research identifies 22 fields that declined in absolute numbers and/or prevalence over a 35-year period. Most were basic fields in the arts and sciences. Steep declines were evident only in a few fields, notably European languages and literatures. Larger, higher status, and historically liberal arts oriented institutions were less likely to dr...
Article
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Conventional sociological accounts of the rise and fall of academic fields have been challenged by accounts based on the idea of market-responsive change. In this article, we focus on the period 1980—2000, the period during which, according to its proponents, the market model of change became dominant in academe. We find changes in the student mark...
Article
The emergence and institutionalization of cooperation in sizable groups without reciprocity receives considerable attention in game-theoretical modeling. Agents in our study play the Prisoner's Dilemma game cooperating with tolerably similar neighbors. They may imitate cultural markers (tags) and tolerance from more successful neighbors. Alternativ...
Article
The article provides an overview of the changes that have taken place in the kibbutzim since 1990 and assesses their significance. Between 1995 and 2010, most kibbutzim abandoned their traditional practice of sharing income “from each according to ability, to each according to need”, and began paying differential salaries to members on the basis of...
Article
This paper presents an agent-based model of worker protest. Workers have varying degrees of grievance depending on the difference between their wage and the average of their neighbors. They protest with probabilities proportional to grievance, but are inhibited by the risk of being arrested – which is determined by the ratio of coercive agents to p...
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This paper investigates the characteristics of US colleges and universities that were early adopters of post-1970 academic growth fields. It examines hypotheses drawn from four analytical perspectives on sources of organizational change: organizational ecology, inter-institutional stratification, demographic composition, and historical traditions....
Article
Large amounts of detailed transactional information are generated by ongoing social processes. For managing and mining such data, we treat them as “objects” and “relations”. These ideas strongly parallel the way that social network analysts conceive of social structure. Modality (roughly, distinguishing multiple classes of social actors or nodes in...
Article
This chapter analyzes the antecedents and consequences of transformations that have recently been occurring among Israeli kibbutzim. After serving for nearly a century as some of the world's best known examples of organizations that distribute resources “from each, according to ability, to each according to need,” most kibbutzim now pay their membe...
Article
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: Analysis of college catalogs from 292 four-year colleges and universities over a 25-year period revealed four popular models of general education: “core distribution areas,” “traditional liberal arts,” “cultures and ethics,” and “civic/utilitarian.” During the period more general education courses were required and the number of r...
Article
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We aimed to examine the co-authorship networks in three successful Iranian academic research centers, in order to find the association between the scientific productivity and impact indicators with network features in a case study. We searched for English articles of the three research centers. We drew co-authorship maps of each center and calculat...
Article
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Using data on upper-division students in the University of California system, we show that two distinct cultures of engagement exist on campus. The culture of engagement in the arts, humanities and social sciences focuses on interaction, participation, and interest in ideas. The culture of engagement in the natural sciences and engineering focuses...
Article
The co-authorship network of scientists represents a prototype of social networks. By mapping the graph containing all relevant publications of members in an international collaboration network: COLLNET, we infer the structural mechanisms that govern the topology of this social system. Structure of the network effect not only individual’s collabora...
Article
Full-text available
This article introduces cluster analysis and reference set analysis as tools for understanding structure, identity, and aspiration in complex organizational fields. Cluster analysis is used to identify the structure of the organizational field in American four-year colleges and universities. The article shows that presidential choices of reference...
Article
By mapping the electronic database containing all papers in Scientometrics for a 26-year period (1978-2004), we uncover the topological measures that characterize the network at a given moment, as well as the time evolution of these quantities. The citation network of the journal displays the characteristic features of a “small-world” network of lo...
Article
This study examines the diffusion of 34 innovations among Israel's 240 nonreligious kibbutzim from 1990 through 2001. The changes involve transfers of the authority of the general assembly to independent boards of directors and specialized committees or experts, privatization of consumption, and increasing inequality in compensation. We track year-...
Book
introduction to social networks, interesting the centrality chapter.
Article
Foundation (NSF- SES-0086423-002) supported the research reported in this paper. In this paper, we introduce presidential reference sets as a tool for understanding issues of identity, cultural division, and aspiration in higher education. The analysis yields four key findings. First, we show that several well-known and widely used classifications...

Citations

... Once the land was filled up a situation of "circumscription" emerged in which the costs of migration were higher because unoccupied or lightly occupied land was no longer available. This raised the level of conflict within and between polities raising the mortality rate and serving as a demographic regulator (Fletcher et al., 2011). In these circumstances, technological and organizational innovations were stimulated and successful new strategies were strongly selected for by interpolity competition, leading to the emergence of complexity, hierarchy and a new logic of social reproduction based on institutionalized coercion. ...
... At most colleges, the general education core includes introductory courses distributed across broad fields like the humanities, social sciences, and physical sciences (Hart Research Associates, 2016;Jaschnik, 2016). General education courses comprise one third of the average college curriculum (Brint et al., 2009). Although academic credits may help students to pursue an academic degree (and by way of paving the path to that degree, promise high returns), it is unclear whether or how academic credits influence labor market outcomes. ...
... 26 Thanks to our UC-Riverside colleague Bob Hanneman and a group of graduate students at UC-Riverside we have published two simulation modeling projects. One develops the iteration model in the context of small-scale worldsystems(Apkarian et al 2013) and the other is a representation of Randy Collins's theory of battle victory(Fletcher et al 2012).27 This multilevel model is motivated by our finding that only half of the urban and polity upsweeps were caused by non-core marcher states. ...
... One important strain of literature says no (Hannan and Freeman 1989: 136). Other scholarly literature says yes (Brint et al. 2012a, b;Frank and Gabler 2006;Frank et al. 1994;Gabler and Frank 2005;Slaughter 1993Slaughter , 1998. ...
... There are two issues to consider. First, eliciting data across multiple network layers is time consuming and often induces participant fatigue, with participant responsiveness declining with each question asked (Pustejovsky and Spillane 2009;Tourangeau and Rasinski 1988;Yousefi-Nooraie et al. 2019). Second, the names elicited in earlier questions may prime responses in subsequent questions. ...
... Based on the results of this study, training topics could include information on accessing the literature and adapting EBIs so that they are relevant to the community. Previous and ongoing studies have demonstrated the benefit of different EBDM training approaches for individuals' confidence and skills related to EBDM [35,[62][63][64][65][66][67]. Within the United States, there are several training programs and materials available to public health practitioners, including those developed by the Regional Public Health Training Centers, the National Network of Public Health Institutes, the Public Health Foundation, CDC, universities, and professional groups such as the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors (e.g., STAR program). ...
... Leadership support may be especially important in preventing mis-implementation, as the expectation and support for using ongoing, evidence-based decisionmaking could ameliorate the effects of inertia and sunk cost on decisions to continue implementation of ineffective programs. Previous research has focused on developing, testing, and disseminating strategies to increase the use of evidence-based public health [50][51][52][53][54][55][56], and future research and practice efforts should continue to determine the best ways to support the use of evidence-based public health in governmental public health agencies [57]. ...
... Some consider social networks as an important part of the hidden curriculum [17][18][19]. However, despite the growing utilization of this method in other fields, SNA studies in the field of health education are rare [20]. ...
... 54 Survivors with opportunities to communicate through Web-based channels (eg, discussion board, chat, e-mail, and blog) are likely to expand their social networks and receive useful social support. 55 AYA patients with cancer and cancer survivors who participate in online support communities reported a greater sense of connectedness and felt less lonely. 56 A recent study suggests that using Facebook as a communication platform may increase engagement in physical activities among young adult survivors through information sharing, increased motivation, and provision of tangible or intangible support. ...
... 26 Thanks to our UC-Riverside colleague Bob Hanneman and a group of graduate students at UC-Riverside we have published two simulation modeling projects. One develops the iteration model in the context of small-scale worldsystems(Apkarian et al 2013) and the other is a representation of Randy Collins's theory of battle victory(Fletcher et al 2012).27 This multilevel model is motivated by our finding that only half of the urban and polity upsweeps were caused by non-core marcher states. ...