Richard Hatchett's scientific contributions

Publications (15)

Article
New technologies and unprecedented public investment have transformed vaccine development and allowed fast delivery of safe and efficacious COVID-19 vaccines, mitigating the impact of the pandemic on health and the economy. A quantum change in public investment for vaccine development and widespread vaccine distribution are necessary to achieve glo...
Article
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Introduction Ebola virus disease (EVD) continues to be a significant public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa, especially in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Large-scale vaccination during outbreaks may reduce virus transmission. We established a large population-based clinical trial of a heterologous, two-dose prophylactic vaccine du...
Article
Full-text available
Launched at Davos in January 2017 with funding from sovereign investors and philanthropic institutions, the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) is an innovative partnership between public, private, philanthropic, and civil organisations whose mission is to stimulate, finance and co-ordinate vaccine development against diseases wi...
Article
Correction to: Bundesgesundheitsbl 2019 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00103-019-03061-2 In the original publication of this article, the author name Richard Hatchett was incorrectly published.The correct author name is shown above.The original article has been ….
Article
Full-text available
The Coalition of Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) was formed in the aftermath of the 2014-15 Ebola outbreak in west Africa to support the development of vaccines that could improve the world's preparedness against outbreaks of epidemic infectious diseases. Since its launch in 2017, CEPI has mobilised over US$ 750 million to support its miss...
Article
The Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) was created as a result of an emerging global consensus that a coordinated, international, and intergovernmental effort was needed to develop and deploy new vaccines to prevent future epidemics. Although some disease outbreaks can be relatively brief, early outbreak response activities can...

Citations

... The broader health effects (B), including the mental health impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and related social restrictions, the overload on health systems, and the disproportional direct/indirect health burden of disadvantaged groups in society associated with the pandemic, were well documented [39][40][41][42][43][44][45][46]. However, limited evidence was identified to assess the monetary value of vaccination through its impact on mental health or considering the health equity aspects of the pandemic or vaccination [47][48][49]. While certain elements of the public finance impact of the pandemic (C) have been estimated for both the US and UK, no study was identified calculating the full public finance impact or the return on investment of the COVID-19 vaccines [18,50,51]. ...
... Since a phase 3 clinical efficacy trial has not been possible, immunobridging was used to demonstrate clinical benefit, comparing non-human primate (NHP) protection and immunogenicity data to human immunogenicity data [25]. During the 2018-2020 DRC outbreak, phase 3 effectiveness studies of this candidate in peri-outbreak areas were initiated but were adversely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic; immunogenicity data from vaccinated individuals is likely to inform durability [26]. Ultimately, the Janssen vaccine was granted marketing authorization by the EC in July 2020 and was recommended by the WHO's SAGE on immunization for use during outbreaks for individuals at some risk of EBOV exposure and preventively, in the absence of an outbreak, for national and international first responders in neighboring areas or countries to which an outbreak might spread. ...
... Furthermore, the recent coronavirus virus outbreak worldwide has demonstrated the need for more accessible approaches to accelerate vaccine generation as part of a rapid response (76). Several VACV-vectored vaccines are already in clinical development or approved for use against several infectious diseases, including monkeypox virus, Ebola virus, measles virus, rabies viruses, and respiratory syncytial virus (77). ...
... As a result of the 'all hands on deck' approach to combating viral pandemics, significant advances will be made regarding the pathogenesis and potential reaction to future viral threats. Past efforts including massive vaccination schedules to eradicate polio and measles 80 as other infectious diseases 81 , technological gains in detection seen with the AIDS pandemic 82 , and the proliferation of diagnostic testing for influenza 65 , are suggestive of the research efforts that will enhance the healthcare response to future pandemics. Initial increase in testing for a novel pandemic viral disease within the laboratory may give way to increased efforts focused on tracking and monitoring disease progression for the most severe cases. ...
... They may be either newly identified diseases or previously known diseases that are rapidly expanding in incidence or geographic scope (4). EIDs are a growing threat due to increased travel, increasing population density, deforestation, and climate change (5). Many EIDs are zoonotic, such as Zika, avian influenza, coronaviruses, Ebola and Marburg, and some have the potential to cause epidemics and pandemics. ...
... While the world is still being affected by the recent SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, the crucial need for novel antiviral platform technology research in vaccine development is urgently required. As regards the unpredictable nature of viral epidemics, the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations accelerates the expansion of various vaccine platforms against emerging infectious diseases, such as MERS-CoV and CHIKV before their epidemics appear (8). ...
... In the first two phases, the financing is well covered by investors such as CEPI, the KOVAC AND RAKOVEC | 11 Bill&Melinda Gates Foundation, PATHS and others, but in the third stage of late development, which actually accounts for about 70% of total development costs, there is a big gap in financing as there is no too little funding for late-stage trials. 139 This results in the dropping out of smaller participants who do not possess adequate finance for vaccine development and commercialisation. Therefore, one suggestion to improve long-term incentives is to ensure consistent funding during the whole process of vaccine development. ...
... The development of COVID-19 vaccines with efficacy against both infection and severe disease is a welcome and remarkable development and key to pandemic control [1,2]. Despite vaccine availability, optimising therapeutics for people hospitalised with COVID-19 remains essential as existing vaccines provide imperfect protection and because access to vaccines remains limited in many countries [3]. The emergence of SARS-Co-V variant strains associated with apparent differential vaccine efficacy is another reason why therapeutics will remain critical for the foreseeable future. ...
... The first instance of Coronavirus Disease 2019 , which is brought on by the SARS-CoV-2 unique human coronavirus, was documented in Wuhan, China, in December 2019 (Li et al., 2020;Lurie et al., 2020). Due to its spread across all continents, the World Health Organization (WHO) proclaimed it a worldwide pandemic on March 11, 2020(WHO, 2020. ...
... This R&D Blueprint prioritizes and regularly updates a list of pathogens for the development of diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. The Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) was launched in 2017 to accelerate the development of vaccines against emerging infectious diseases and to enable equitable access to these vaccines for people during outbreaks [9][10][11]. The first call for proposals from CEPI was on developing vaccines for Lassa virus (LASV), MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and Nipah virus (NiV). ...