Rich Grenyer's research while affiliated with University of Oxford and other places

Publications (5)

Article
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The Red List of Threatened Species, published by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), is a crucial tool for conservation decision-making. However, despite substantial effort, numerous species remain unassessed or have insufficient data available to be assigned a Red List extinction risk category. Moreover, the Red Listing proc...
Article
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The recent growth of online big data offers opportunities for rapid and inexpensive measurement of public interest. Conservation culturomics is an emerging research area that uses online data to study human-nature relationships for conservation. Methods for conservation culturomics, though promising, are still being developed and refined. We consid...
Article
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Large body size, the defining characteristic of “charismatic megafauna,” is often viewed as the most significant correlate of higher public interest in species. However, common, local species (many of which are not large) can also generate public interest. We explored the relative importance of body size versus local occurrence in patterns of onlin...
Article
AbSTRACT In responses to our paper questioning Israel's great biodiversity, Gavish and Yom-Tov claim that our methods and geographic scope are erroneous, and responsible for our inability to find Israel as diversity hotspot. They maintain that relative to its latitude and realm, Israel is very species-rich. However, our original work corrected for...
Article
Aims (1) To map the species richness of Australian lizards and describe patterns of range size and species turnover that underlie them. (2) To assess the congruence in the species richness of lizards and other vertebrate groups. (3) To search for commonalities in the drivers of species richness in Australian vertebrates. Location Australia. Methods...

Citations

... We suspect that many Data Deficient species would be assessed as threatened in the future because they often have similar attributes (e.g., small ranges, high levels of human pressure across their ranges) to species assessed as threatened (Gumbs et al., 2020). This assertion is supported by recent studies using an automated extinction risk assessment process through machine learning that has predicted that Data Deficient reptile species are substantially more likely to fall within a threat category than expected given the overall percentage of threatened reptiles (Borgelt et al., 2022;Caetano et al., 2022). A prediction of higher-than-average risk was also made for reptile species that have not yet been evaluated (i.e., ...
... Miquel-Ribé and Laniado (2018) showed that the different language editions of Wikipedia pages reflect cultural differences, as the contents cover local topics corresponding to different linguistic regions. Other studies focused on metrics about the attention generated around Wikipedia articles (e.g., likes or page view counts), showing how they reflect current topics of interest at a particular time/region (Dzogang et al., 2016;Mittermeier et al., 2019Mittermeier et al., , 2021Roll et al., 2016;Vilain et al., 2017), and even demonstrating the potential of Wikipedia pages to monitor the spread of diseases (Generous et al., 2014). ...
... We consider the data provided by Wikipedia as a useful and rich source that might help to measure preferences among the public and its changes on a short-term, that is, daily basisin contrast to, for example, surveys which are mostly conducted on a monthly, sometimes weekly basis (e.g. Munzert, 2015;Mittermeier et al., 2021; see also Herrmann and Döring, 2021, who measure the ideological profile of parties on the basis of their Wikipedia entries). However, not much is known about the characteristics of Wikipedia users and whether they are representative for all citizens, for instance, in terms of education, gender, or ideological orientation. ...
... This inter-regional position has consequences. National biota have been considered species-rich relative to the area (Yom-Tov and Tchernov 1988;Yom-tov and Werner 1996) although this has been contested, arguing that small areas are relatively more species-rich than large ones (Roll et al. 2009(Roll et al. , 2011but see Yom-Tov 2011a, 2011b. Each of these four regional ecosystems includes some biogeographical heterogeneity (Yomtov and Werner 1996). ...
... One of the dominant features of Oceania, New Guinea, and Eastern Wallacea's terrestrial vertebrate fauna are lizards and particularly those of the family Scincidae, generally referred to as 'skinks' (Squamata: Scincomorpha: Scincidae). Skinks make up almost one-quarter of the world's lizard diversity and have a prominent richness hotspot in New Guinea (Chapple et al. 2021) which is second only to the global hotspot in Australia (Rabosky et al. 2007;Powney et al. 2010;Chapple et al. 2021). In addition to their high diversity in New Guinea, they are also the most diverse terrestrial vertebrates throughout the Pacific Ocean. ...