Reuben Rose-Redwood's research while affiliated with University of Victoria and other places

Publications (19)

Article
For over five centuries, cartographic map-making has played a pivotal role as a political technology of empire-building, settler colonialism, and the dispossession of Indigenous lands. Yet Indigenous peoples themselves have long engaged in their own mapping practices to share ancestral knowledge, challenge colonial rule, and reclaim Indigenous “pla...
Article
Full-text available
The spread of the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) has resulted in the most devastating global public health crisis in over a century. At present, over 7 million people from around the world have contracted the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), leading to more than 400,000 deaths globally. The global health crisis unleashed by the COVID-19 pandemi...
Article
In recent decades, urban policymakers have increasingly embraced the selling of naming rights as a means of generating revenue to construct and maintain urban infrastructure. This practice of “toponymic commodification” first emerged with the commercialization of professional sports during the second half of the 20th century and has become an integ...
Article
This study explores the cultural politics of renaming the world's tallest building, the Burj Dubai/Khalifa, as a practice of entrepreneurial urbanism. The Burj offers a unique case study that brings urban scholarship on ‘worlding’ into conversation with emerging debates over the commodification of naming rights within critical toponymic studies. We...
Article
The selling of naming rights to corporate sponsors has led urban policymakers to increasingly view the identities of public places as rent-generating assets to fund urban infrastructure. Yet few scholars have critically analyzed this emerging global trend of toponymic commodification and the seeking of “naming rent.” Through a combination of archiv...
Article
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The contributions to this forum have highlighted how the limits to scholarly dialogue are multiple and have had serious consequences for the ways in which knowledges are produced and debated in the academy, the media, and wider society. In this rejoinder to the commentaries on our article, ‘The Possibilities and Limits to Dialogue’, we embrace the...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, we explore the nature, value, and challenges of dialogue both within and outside the academy. After considering the possibilities and limits to dialogue, we divide our analysis into three sections, first discussing dialogue as a form of embodied action, next examining dialogue as a means of enacting a critically affirmative politic...
Chapter
This chapter provides a genealogy of the grid and a critical reassessment of the limitations of Stanislawski’s theory of the grid’s origin as a means of challenging the doctrine of geographical diffusionism more generally. It then offers a selective overview of recent approaches to understanding the grid and calls for a comparative genealogy of gri...
Chapter
This introductory chapter provides an overview of interdisciplinary scholarship on the urban grid from a comparative historical perspective. Its general aim is to situate the current edited collection within broader discussions of the grid in urban history from antiquity to the present. In doing so, the chapter explores the political and economic r...
Chapter
This chapter examines the performative dimensions of historical narration as a form of modern mythmaking by reconsidering conventional narratives on the “origins” of Manhattan’s grid street plan of 1811. The historical mythology of the grid espoused in canonical readings of the Plan of 1811 relies extensively on a rearticulation of the official exp...
Book
This book is the first edited collection to bring together classic and contemporary writings on the urban grid in a single volume. The contributions showcased in this book examine the spatial histories of the grid from multiple perspectives in a variety of urban contexts. They explore the grid as both an indigenous urban form and a colonial imposit...
Article
We are living in troubling and uncertain times. Xenophobia is on the rise as right-wing, authoritarian nationalism has witnessed significant electoral gains and the very ideals of democratic inclusiveness and international pluralism are under direct attack. With the election of Donald Trump as President of the United States, the country with the la...
Article
This special issue marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of the publication of J.B. Harley's "Deconstructing the Map" (1989), which has had a major influence in the fields of critical cartography, the history of cartography, and human geography more generally. Over the last quarter century, this essay and related works have also been widely cited by s...

Citations

... Our positioning in the world affects how we know the world, and our knowledge of the world affects how we act in the world (Qin, 2018). This positioning is geographical, cultural, temporal. ...
... More and more scholars have begun to focus on the geographically uneven impact and consequences of the epidemic. In particular, different countries have significant differences in the spatial nature of communication, the vulnerability of human life, the quality of health care and the effectiveness of national policies (15). Other scholars believe that COVID-19 itself reflects more power imbalance in space, as well as social and political contradictions between countries and regions (16). ...
... In recent years, the commercial use of place-names continues to unfold in its diversity (Rose-Redwood et al. 2019b). Analyzing the global practices of commercial use of toponyms, Basik (2018) distinguishes between two dominant groups of subjects (public authorities and business), three main strategic toponymic practices (use of existing toponym, creation of a new toponym, acquisition or lease of toponym) and three types of place name commodification (infrastructural, gentrification -led and tourist). ...
... Analyzing the global practices of commercial use of toponyms, Basik (2018) distinguishes between two dominant groups of subjects (public authorities and business), three main strategic toponymic practices (use of existing toponym, creation of a new toponym, acquisition or lease of toponym) and three types of place name commodification (infrastructural, gentrification -led and tourist). In particular, these are opportunities and practices of vending the rights to name infrastructure objects in order to generate income for their construction and maintenance (Basik 2018 andRose-Redwood et al. 2019a), development of thematic and linguistic tourism (Mair 2009 andMühlhäusler andNash 2016), creation of artificial geocultural spaces (Hopkins 1990, Gottdiener 1997and Zhao et al. 2019, transformation of urban space in order to increase the demand for real estate and symbolic marking of social and property status (Alderman 2008, Vuolteenaho and Ainiala 2009, Sokolova 2016, Madden 2018and Sotoudehnia and Rose-Redwood 2018. ...
... Analyzing the global practices of commercial use of toponyms, Basik (2018) distinguishes between two dominant groups of subjects (public authorities and business), three main strategic toponymic practices (use of existing toponym, creation of a new toponym, acquisition or lease of toponym) and three types of place name commodification (infrastructural, gentrification -led and tourist). In particular, these are opportunities and practices of vending the rights to name infrastructure objects in order to generate income for their construction and maintenance (Basik 2018 andRose-Redwood et al. 2019a), development of thematic and linguistic tourism (Mair 2009 andMühlhäusler andNash 2016), creation of artificial geocultural spaces (Hopkins 1990, Gottdiener 1997and Zhao et al. 2019, transformation of urban space in order to increase the demand for real estate and symbolic marking of social and property status (Alderman 2008, Vuolteenaho and Ainiala 2009, Sokolova 2016, Madden 2018and Sotoudehnia and Rose-Redwood 2018. ...
... It should also be further contrasted with the recent insidious practice of attempting to silence progressive scholars in academia under the pretense of promoting 'free speech', while actually promoting racism and colonialism (cf. Rose-Redwood et al., 2018a, for a discussion). Finally, as Janz (2018: 124) reminds us, given that listening 'is difficult to compel, hard to measure, and easy to mischaracterize', it also enables effective silencing of participants in dialogue-scholarly and otherwise-through not listening. ...
... These contextual conditions reaffirm the necessity to re-examine whether or what Confucianism can contribute to what we term a 'dialogical geopolitics'. This is a geopolitics that challenges 'the naturalized and ideological basis to traditional geopolitics' by fostering a more cosmopolitan scholarly dialogue that goes beyond state-centrism (Agnew, 2010: 569;Rose-Redwood et al., 2018). ...
... At the center of the Tunis square mile lies its Medina, with a complex urban fabric that evolved over the middle ages (Kostof, 1991;Micaud, 1978). Finally, Atlanta is typical of many American downtowns: coarse-grained, disconnected, and surrounded by freeways (Allen, 1996;Grable, 1979;Jackson, 1985;Kruse, 2007;Rose, 2001). ...
... Both events have been interpreted as reflecting a trend in the developed West of populist backlash against decades of neoliberal globalization that has exacerbated inequalities and benefited cosmopolitan, socially and geographically mobile elites at the expense of the masses (Norris & Inglehart, 2019). With HE internationalization and student mobility being emblematic of precisely these neoliberal logics of globalization (as discussed earlier), scholars have raised well justified concerns over the negative impact of rising populism and right-wing movements for ISM in these two top ISM destination countries (Bartram, 2018;Rose-Redwood & Rose-Redwood, 2017). More broadly, media scholar Flew (2020) argues that what the former Trump presidency and Brexit signalled is possibly the arrival of a "post-globalization" era, in which there is to be a return and reassertion of the national in world relations. ...
... While the underlying principles laid out by Harley for the deconstruction of mapmaking remain influential and important (Krygier 2015;Rose-Redwood 2015), this article sets out to explore how these ideas are manifest in the academic Geographic Information Science (GIScience) literature related to the geospatial web (geoweb) and geographic crowdsourcing (from hereafter referred to simply as crowdsourcing) as a generic term, referring to the global network of services that connect geographic data, geotags (electronic geographic locations assigned to digital media), and other digital information (Scharl and Tochtermann 2009). In using "geoweb," we do not restrict our analyses of the literature by this term, rather, we have adopted it as an encompassing descriptor, enabling us to avoid providing long lists of related terms at each mention. ...