Renée van Bezooijen's research while affiliated with University of Groningen and other places

Publications (44)

Article
Several studies (e.g., Ház 2005) have found German to be easier to understand for Dutch listeners than Dutch for German listeners. This asymmetry has been attributed to the fact that German is an obligatory subject in Dutch secondary school and that many Dutch people watch German television. In contrast, it is much less common for German children t...
Chapter
Scharpff & Van Heuven (1988) have shown that low-quality, synthetic speech is better understood when pauses are inserted at prosodic boundaries. Their study pertains to an L1 situation. In the present paper we test the hypothesis that the positive effect of particular pauses on intelligibility within the same language can be generalized to speech o...
Article
This paper reports on the intelligibility of spoken Low German and Standard German for speakers of Dutch. Two aspects are considered. First, the relative potential for intelligibility of the Low German variety of Bremen and the High German variety of Modern Standard German for speakers of Dutch is tested. Second, the question is raised whether Low...
Article
The most straightforward way to explain why Danes understand spoken Swedish relatively better than Swedes understand spoken Danish would be that spoken Danish is intrinsically a more difficult language to understand than spoken Swedish. We discuss circumstantial evidence suggesting that Danish is intrinsically poorly intelligible. We then report on...
Chapter
In the present study we quantitatively examined similarly constructed samples of formal spoken Swedish and Dutch in order to compare the composition of the lexicons. Results showed that Swedish has many more loans than Dutch, namely 44.4% against 27.9%. Within the Swedish loans there is a large compartment of Low German (38.7%), whereas most loans...
Chapter
Full-text available
The volume we are introducing here contains a selection of the papers presented at a special track on computational techniques for studying language variation held at The Thirteenth International Conference on Methods in Dialectology in Leeds on Aug. 4-5, 2008. We are grateful to the organizers, Nigel Armstrong, Joan Beal,Fiona Douglas, Barry Hesel...
Article
The volume we are introducing here contains a selection of the papers presented at a special track on computational techniques for studying language variation held at The Thirteenth International Conference on Methods in Dialectology in Leeds on Aug. 4-5, 2008. We are grateful to the conference organizers, for their cooperation in our organization...
Article
There have been quite a few studies exploring popular ideas and knowledge of variation in the Dutch language area. However, emphasis has always been on the geographic dimension, historic variation remaining underexposed. In the present article we present the results of an investigation which focussed on the knowledge that non-linguists possess of t...
Article
In the present investigation we aim to determine to which degree linguistic factors contribute to the intelligibility of Swedish words among Danes. We therefore correlated the results of an experiment on word intelligibility with eleven linguistic factors and carried out regression analyses. In the experiment, the intelligibility of 384 frequent Sw...
Article
The volume we are introducing here contains a selection of the papers presented at a special track on computational techniques for studying language variation held at The Thirteenth International Conference on Methods in Dialectology in Leeds on 4–5 August 2008. We are grateful to the conference organisers, Nigel Armstrong, Joan Beal, Fiona Douglas...
Article
Full-text available
It is a fundamental insight of dialectology that language variation is structured geographically (Nerbonne & Kleiweg 2006). Besides a low geographic distance, large population sizes may increase social contact between two locations and the chance that the respective dialects are influenced by each other. Analoguous to the gravity model in physics,...
Article
Full-text available
It is a fundamental insight of dialectology that language variation is structured geographically (Nerbonne & Kleiweg 2006). Apart from geographic proximity, large population sizes may increase social contact between comunities living in two separate locations and thus the chance that the respective dialects are influenced by each other. Analoguous...
Article
At present, three variants of /r/ co-occur in northern Standard Dutch i.e. the variant of Standard Dutch as spoken in the Netherlands. In addition to the older alveolar and uvular consonantal types of /r/, there is now an approximant type of /r/, which is restricted to syllable coda. This approximant /r/ has been around at least since the beginning...
Article
Three experiments are described investigating the role of different linguistic levels in the identification of language varieties. The results reveal that prosodic features play a minor role in the identification of language varieties, both in the United Kingdom and in the Netherlands. The role of pronunciation varies. In some cases, pronunciation...
Article
Japanese women have been found to have higher pitches than Dutch women. This finding has been explained in the past by assuming that Japanese women raise their pitch in order to project a vocal image associated with feminine attributes of powerlessness. In the present study three hypotheses underlying such an assumption were tested experimentally:...
Article
In this paper a selective overview is given of methods used for the evaluation of text-to-speech (TTS) systems, with some comments on their advantages and disadvantages. The overview is confined to subjective methods of evaluation, i.e. methods which make use of human listeners. Objective methods, which try to assess quality by means of signal proc...
Article
In this paper the results are presented of an auditory description of 32 nonmanipulated, low-pass-filtered, and random-spliced speech samples. The description consisted of the ratings by three raters on 24 speech scales. The aim of this study was to establish the effects of the manipulations on the perception of speech. Insight into this question w...
Article
Verbally neutral, spontaneous speech samples were selected from interviews with 16 younger and 16 older males (mean ages 17 and 69 years, respectively) varying in socio-economic status (SES). All informants were native of Nijmegen, a city in the mideast of the Netherlands. The speech samples were rated with respect to the degree of accentedness and...
Article
The results of three experiments showed that Dutch, Taiwanese, and Japanese adults were able to identify Dutch vocal expressions of emotion beyond chance expectancy. Inspection of the confusion data further revealed that, in addition to symmetrical confusions, there were quite a few confusions that were asymmetrical. The outcomes of a multidimensio...
Article
In this article a number of empirical studies are described which have been conducted to gain insight into present-day norms with respect to spoken standard Dutch. More specifically an answer was sought to the following two questions: to what extent do listeners agree when asked to judge speech samples with respect to the degree of standardness and...
Article
Full-text available
complex) data analysis techniques. The final aim is to draw a linguistically based map showing the distribution and boundaries of dialects and dialect areas. Some of the more well- known examples of these 'objective' techniques include the construction and tracing of isoglosses and isogloss bundles (e.g. Weijnen 1941), feature frequency counts and...

Citations

... The slow speed of delivery and the insertion of pauses when the speaker is looking for words would allow the nonnative listener time to integrate what has been heard and to predict upcoming words. The beneficial effect of insertion of pauses (with compensation for slower rate of delivery) has been demonstrated for low-quality Dutch speech synthesis and for natural Dutch speech in noise (Scharpff, 1994; Scharpff & Van Heuven, 1988; Van Heuven & Scharpff, 1991), as well as for Danish perceived by Swedish listeners (Gooskens & Van Bezooijen, 2014). Moreover, the foreign talker will use a fairly restricted vocabulary comprising high-frequency words only (e.g., Cervatiuc, 2008; Milton & Meara, 1995) so that the listeners will not often be confronted with unfamiliar words. ...
... Over time, we aim to optimize gameplay using machine learning techniques for personalization (e.g. Vleugel, Spruit and Daal, 2010), and even investigate the added value of factors such as playroom environment and its geographical location and local population density as possible language variation indicators (Heeringa et al., 2007). ...
... Across (at least) Germanic European languages there seems to be a general tendency to feature both rhotic and non-rhotic varieties 3 (see e.g. Ulbrich & Ulbrich, 2007;Ulbrich, 1972Ulbrich, , 2002Wiese, 2001 for German;Heselwood, Plug & Tickle, 2010;Wells, 1982 for English;Scobbie, & Sebregts, 2011;Sebregts et al., 2003;Van de Velde & van Hout, 2001 for Dutch). ...
... Proficiency in additional languages that are closely related to both the L1 and the Lx often contributes positively to receptive multilingualism skills (e. g., Berthele 2011;Berthele and Lambelet 2009;Vanhove et al. 2015a; but see Bezooijen et al. 2012). A measure of proficiency in English, the only Germanic language beside Standard German and Swiss German that our participants knew, was therefore included in the analyses as a control covariate. ...
... Indeed, intelligibility rates have been successfully measured and socio-cultural variables appropriately controlled. For example, van Bezooijen and Gooskens (2007) and Gooskens (2006) report measurements where influence from attitudes has been minimised by screening subjects so as to exclude those with strong positive or negative attitudes, as well as matching the subject groups according to their attitudes towards the varieties to be tested. Techniques for the elicitation of attitudes include the use of screening questionnaires and the matched-guise technique. ...
... However, the contribution of lexical and grammatical profi ciency in Russian should not be overestimated when it comes to the general understanding of Ukrainian texts. Indeed, language profi ciency tests capture only one aspect of linguistic profi ciency, while there are also extra-linguistic factors that play a role as for example, language exposure (Branets & Backus 2020; see also especially the studies conducted in the frame of the MICReLa project, such as Gooskens et al. 2015;Swarte et al. 2013;Gooskens & Heeringa 2014;Schüppert & Gooskens 2010, etc.). Th e same suggestion has been made in a series of other RM studies (Gooskens & Swarte 2007;Verschik 2012;Bahtina-Jantsikene 2013;Berthele & Wittlin 2013). ...
... We adopted PCA in our efforts to reduce our large multivariate database of Coh-Metrix indices to fewer functional dimensions. PCA is routinely used in such data reduction efforts in computational linguistics and educational data mining (e.g., Brun, Ehrmann, & Jacquet, 2007; Honkela, Hyvarinen, & Vayrynen, 2010; Nerbonne, Gooskens, Kürschner, & van Bezooijen, 2008). The final analysis included 53 Coh- Metrix measures that reduced to eight principal components. ...
... Daarom kunnen we verwachten dat de oordelen op verzorgdheid sterk zullen correleren met die op standaard. Van Bezooijen (1997 (2) De Randstadshypothese: de Nederlandse uitspraaknorm ligt in de Randstad. ...
... The three realizations represent different degrees of reduction that are style-dependent and inversely proportional to articu-641 latory effort. Also, there is very little doubt that minimization of muscular effort plays a decisive role in the changes that affect the "r" sound of Dutch (van Bezooijen et al. 2002) and the trill and tap of Catalan (cf. Recacens and Espinosa 2007;Colantoni 2006) that frequently undergo reduction to approximants in casual speech, but can be also realized as fricatives. ...
... Bezooijen & Van den Berg, 1999c;Van Bezooijen & Gooskens, 2005, 2007aGooskens, 2007;Gooskens & Van Bezooijen, 2006;Oldehinkel, 2017;De Vries, 2010) and also including, to a lesser extent, Flanders (Van Bezooijen & Van den Berg, 1999a, 1999b. These studies, however, focused on the structural linguistic aspects that may favor intelligibility between regional Germanic varieties spoken in the Netherlands and Flanders, and mainly aimed at measuring cognate recognition and reproduction. ...