Renée Mauborgne's research while affiliated with INSEAD and other places

Publications (53)

Article
Ten years ago, two INSEAD professors broke ground by introducing "blue ocean strategy," a new model for discovering uncontested markets that are ripe for growth. In this article, they apply their concepts and tools to what is perhaps the greatest challenge of leadership: closing the gulf between the potential and the realized talent and energy of e...
Book
Full-text available
If you need the best practices and ideas for creating business models that drive growth--but don't have time to find them--this book is for you. Here are 10 inspiring and useful perspectives, all in one place. This collection of HBR articles will help you: - Reinvent your business profitably - Set your model up for success with a winning competi...
Article
When executives develop corporate strategy, they nearly always begin by analyzing the industry or environmental conditions in which they operate and the strengths and weaknesses of the players they are up against. They then set out to carve a distinctive strategic position from which they can outperform their rivals by building a competitive advant...
Article
By focusing on strategies of competition in established industries, companies and researchers have overlooked the value of creating new market spaces where there are no competitors.These market spaces are called “blue oceans.” Although established industries (“red oceans”) are growing increasingly cluttered, few companies are currently attempting t...
Article
While work in the field of global strategic management has largely focused on defining the content of effective global strategies and on prescribing winning strategic moves for multinationals, this research argues the importance of the process through which global strategies are generated, in particular the perceived procedural justice of that proc...
Article
Purpose – This paper reports the results of more than a decade-long research journey on how firms can go beyond competing to creating uncontested market space, or “blue oceans,” that makes the competition irrelevant. Design/methodology/approach – Studies over 150 blue-ocean creations in over 30 industries spanning more than 100 years from 1880 to 2...
Article
Despite a long-term decline in the circus industry, Cirque du Soleil profitably increased revenue 22-fold over the last ten years by reinventing the circus. Rather than competing within the confines of the existing industry or trying to steal customers from rivals, Cirque developed uncontested market space that made the competition irrelevant. Cirq...
Article
When William Bratton was appointed police commissioner of New York City in 1994, turf wars over jurisdiction and funding were rife and crime was out of control. Yet in less than two years, and without an increase in his budget, Bratton turned New York into the safest large city in the nation. And the NYPD was only the latest of five law-enforcement...
Article
Few companies have a clear strategic vision. The problem, say the authors, stems from the strategic-planning process itself, which usually involves preparing a large document, culled from a mishmash of data provided by people with conflicting agendas. That kind of process almost guarantees an unfocused strategy. Instead, companies should design the...
Article
Identifying which business ideas have real commercial potential is fraught with uncertainty, and even the most admired companies have stumbled. It's not as if they don't know what the challenges of innovation are. A new product has to offer customers exceptional utility at an attractive price, and the company must be able to deliver it at a tidy pr...
Article
Value innovation makes the competition irrelevant by offering fundamentally new and superior buyer value in existing markets and by enabling a quantum leap in buyer value to create new markets. This article presents examples of value innovation in a number of industries.
Article
Most companies focus on matching and beating their rivals. As a result, their strategies tend to take on similar dimensions. What ensues is head-to-head competition based largely on incremental improvements in cost, quality, or both. The authors have studied how innovative companies break free from the competitive pack by staking out fundamentally...
Article
Why are some companies able to sustain high growth in revenues and profits--and others are not? To answer that question, the authors, both of INSEAD, spent five years studying more than 30 companies around the world. They found that the difference between the high-growth companies and their less successful competitors was in each group's assumption...
Article
Collective knowledge building is a key strategic task for firms' success today. But creating and sharing knowledge are intangible activities that can neither be supervised nor forced out of people. They happen only when individuals cooperate voluntarily. A key challenge facing strategic management is obtaining the voluntary cooperation of individua...
Article
How can a multinational formulate an effective global strategy? This paper attempts to address this question by assessing the effect of a procedural justice model of strategic decision making (Kim and Mauborgne [Kim, W. C., R. A. Mauborgne. 1991. Implementing global strategies: The role of procedural justice. Strategic Management J. 12 125--143.],...
Article
This study addresses one of the most compelling questions in the field of international management: How can a multinational simultaneously pursue the double-ended objective of effectively conceiving and executing its worldwide strategy? Here we examine the ways in which the dynamics of the strategy-making process between head office and subsidiary...
Article
Sumario: What most motivates the top managers of multinational subsidiaries to execute the global strategies formulated at headquarters? Is it compensation, monitoring systems, or the magnitude and precision of rewards and punishment? It's none of these, argue the authors. Subsidiary top managers are most concerned that the global strategic decisio...
Chapter
Increasingly global strategy has been recognized to be a key determinant of the success and survival of MNCs. This is traceable, in no small measure, to the non-trivial benefits recognized as flowing from global strategy which include global economies of scale and scope, reduced factor costs, worldwide learning and enhanced competitive leverage (e....
Article
The challenge for executives is to transcend the blinders imposed by their home cultures if operations in foreign cultures are to flourish.
Article
La estrategia del océano azul -- Formulación de la estrategia del océano azul -- Ejecución de la estrategia del océano azul -- Sustentabilidad y renovación de la estrategia del océano azul
Article
Los océanos azules se definen como aquellos mercados no aprovechados, que ofrecen una oportunidad de crecimiento altamente rentable. Son vastos, profundos y están prácticamente intactos, casi inexplorados. En ellos las demanda se crea en lugar de disputarse. Las compañías que abren oceános azules se esfuerzan por volver irrelevante a la competencia...
Article
Sumario: ¿Por qué una misma actividad es capaz de originar la renovación en una empresa y no provocar ninguna variación en otra? Casi siempre, la explicación procede del "liderazgo". Pero aunque es fácil reconocer el liderazgo en acción, resulta difícil definir su esencia porque no puede reducirse a un conjunto de atributos personales ni limitarse...
Article
Título en la cubierta: La estrategia del acéano azul: cómo desarrollar un nuevo mercado donde la competencia no tiene ninguna importancia Traducción de: Blue Ocean Strategy Estudio que plantea revertir la estrategia basada en la competencia a través de la creación de nuevos mecanismos inteligentes para vencerla, y que los autores desarrollan en tre...

Citations

... Procedural justice positively affects the extra-role behavior of subsidiary managers in implementing resource allocation decisions (Kim & Mauborgne, 1996). Kim and Mauborgne (1993) found that commitment, trust, outcome satisfaction, and procedural justice had a positive effect on subsidiary managers' compliance with corporate HQ decisions. People might care about the decisions made by corporate management, but they care even more about the process that has been used to come to these decisions. ...
... Research analyzing particular arrangements between HQs and subsidiaries has primarily been conducted at the macro level (e.g., Kostova & Zaheer, 1999;Marano & Kostova, 2016;Saka-Helmhout, Deeg, & Greenwood, 2016), thereby overlooking the micro-processes through which MNC actors develop these arrangements. The research that addresses coordination between HQ and subsidiary actors at the micro level casts a wide net of inquiry, including micro-politics, resource-dependencies, issue selling, identity construction, role-making and procedural justice (e.g., Bouquet & Birkinshaw, 2008;Clark & Geppert, 2011;Dörrenbächer & Gammelgaard, 2011;Dörrenbächer & Geppert, 2010;Ferner, Edwards, & Tempel, 2012;Kim & Mauborgne, 2005;Schmid & Daniel, 2011;Schotter & Beamish, 2011a, 2011b), but does not sufficiently take into account how the addressed actors evaluate initiatives and why they potentially make concessions to others if hierarchical power is presumed to be low. As a result, MNC scholars focus on strategies with which MNC actors seek to realize their interests rather than asking how actors manage to establish an agreement. ...
... TRKMAN, 2014). Embora MNs sempre tenham existido, mesmo que implicitamente, o interesse em estudar o tema aumentou significativamente nos últimos anos devido ao fato de estar associado ao crescimento e manutenção da competitividade (JOHNSON; CHRISTENSEN; KAGERMANN, 2008;WIRTZ et al., 2016). Novos MNs, ou inovações em modelos de negócio (IMN), também têm sido alvo de interesse recente, pois, além de gerar disrupção e reformular indústrias completamente (JOHNSON; CHRISTENSEN; KAGERMANN, 2008), são uma nova forma, além das tradicionais inovações em produtos, serviços e processos, de as empresas se manterem competitivas (WIRTZ et al., 2016). ...
... To obtain such an advantage, a company generally chooses either to differentiate itself from the competition or to pursue economically smarter products or services. Based on these strategies evolved through either a structuralist approach or reconstructionist approach (Kim and Mauborgne, 2009), KPIs could be set in association with identified key success factors. ...
... The coffee business competition has become a competition in the Red Ocean with the proliferation of new coffee shops. In the red ocean business competition, coffee brands are likened to a shark that pounces on each other (Kim & Mauborgne, 2015a). Business owners must be able to create new markets by offering innovative new values (Kim & Mauborgne, 2015b). ...
... HR practices alignment: MNEs engage in the transfer of organizational practices to foreign subsidiaries for multiple purposes, such as the development of a common corporate culture, the enhancement of procedural justice across its functional units, and the management of the overall external legitimacy of the multinational network (Kim & Mauborgne, 1993;Kostova & Zaheer, 1999). In this direction, scholarly discourse attests that planned transfers of practices do not always work out in the way intended by HQs, and subsidiaries belonging to the same MNE differ in the extent to which they implement and internalise these practices (Kostova & Roth, 2003). ...
... In contrast to examining people's approval of organizational policies which, when implemented, favor members of a disadvantaged social group, the present research focuses on organizational decisions (such as hiring and promotion) that discriminate against individual workers based on their group membership. Specifically, we examine how people judge the legitimacy-the perception that actions are consistent with socially accepted norms, values, and principles (Zelditch, 2001)-of specific organizational decisions involving gender discrimination at the individual level: How do third-party observers react, for example, when an organization decides to hire a less qualified male job candidate over a more qualified female candidate? And what if a less qualified female job candidate is hired over a more qualified male candidate? ...
... This paper addresses the question of what threats digitalization poses to established companies. To systematize the threats, this thesis uses two conceptual approaches: the blue oceans strategy by Kim and Mauborgne (2005) and the disruptive innovation considerations by Christensen (1997). ...
... "Value innovation requires companies to orient the whole system toward achieving a leap in value for both buyers and themselves." W. Chan Kim, 2015 [23] How often do customers ask themselves: "Why don't they ask..."? When shopping in a department store, do you make a note of which products are to be added or removed? ...
... In this regard, certain group characteristics or norms influence the observable fairness in group decisionmaking processes. For example, the extent to which members have equal opportunity to share their inputs and the degree to which their inputs receive fair (and full) consideration are important indicators of fairness in procedural justice literature (e.g., Kim & Mauborgne, 1995). ...