René Glas's research while affiliated with Utrecht University and other places

Publications (15)

Article
Full-text available
In this contribution, we outline Discursive Game Design (DGD) as a practice-based educational framework, explain how to use this design framework to teach game historiography, and report on findings from a series of in-class experiments. Using Nandeck, a freely available software tool for card game prototyping, we created sets of playing cards base...
Article
Full-text available
Simulation games, as a method of playful learning, have been used for more than 70 years in various disciplines with the economy as a leading application field. Their development has been tied with advances in computer science, and nowadays, hundreds of simulation games exist. However , simulation games are not just useful for encouraging disciplin...
Book
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The Playful Citizen Civic Engagement in a Mediatized Culture In the last decade, digital media technologies and developments have given rise to exciting new forms of ludic, or playful, engagements of citizens in cultural and societal issues. From the Occupy movement to playful city-making to the gameful designs of the Obama 2008 and Trump 2016 pres...
Article
This paper deals with play as an important methodological issue when studying games as texts, and is intended as a practical methodological guide. After considering text as both the structuring object as well as its plural processual activations, we argue that different methodological considerations can turn the focus towards one of the two (withou...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
While there have been many discussions about the purpose of game studies programs over the years (e.g., the GDC games Educator summit, the teaching game studies workshops at past DIGRA conferences1 ), relatively few of those discussions resulted in publications on concrete pedagogical strategies. In fact, despite the broadly shared aim of educatin...
Article
This paper explores the notion of cheating in location-based mobile applications. Using the popular smartphone app Foursquare as main case study, I address the question if and how devious practices impact the boundaries between play and reality as a negotiated space of interaction. After establishing Foursquare as a prime example of the gamificatio...
Article
Let G be a k-connected graph with minimum degree d and at least 2d vertices. Then G has a cycle of length at least 2d through any specified set of k vertices. A similar result for paths is also given.
Article
For a set X of vertices of a graph fulfilling a local connectedness conditionresults on the existence of paths and cycles containing X are given.
Article
This paper investigates one the more controversial player practices in MMORPG's, twinking, not in terms of value judgment but as a play from negotiating, working against and even transforming a MMORPG's intended structure and design. Making use of participatory ethnographic observations of one of World of Warcraft's particular forms of twinking, th...

Citations

... The idea is still to bring more spatial and economic science into the gaming domain by tackling the issue of lacking science and realworld situations in educational games. From a game research perspective, however, playing with data sets through game design also has the potential to lay bare the discursive nature of such data and the underlying methods of collection and interpretation [78]. This aligns with Gee's understanding of disciplinary knowledge as "design space" with their own "design grammar" and thereby the need for critical reflection on the rules and technologies used in and thus upholding these knowledge domains [14]. ...
... The emergence of interactive and networked technologies is democratizing the construction and perception of social knowledge, the power structures in daily life, and civic and political engagement (Glas et al. 2019). In this way, seemingly innocuous content such as games about personalities from the political sphere for mobile devices can lead citizens to cross the fine line that today separates full political personalization from indiscriminate government spectacle that is not limited to strategic vote-catching (Berrocal 2003;Balmas and Sheafer 2013;Segado-Boj et al. 2015;López-Meri et al. 2020;Zamora Medina et al. 2021). ...
... Enabling effective awareness and knowledge, theory and practice should be interconnected, including the process of teaching and learning analysis (Khamidov, 2019;Asplund and Kilbrink, 2020;Nepal and Rogerson, 2020). Education practice based on the bottom-up approach could facilitate action from the top-down approach by curriculum integration of the circularity and sustainability vision and providing a greater focus on their concepts through cross-disciplinary and various educational materials, enabling students to collaborate and provide viable solutions (Pászto et al., 2021). Finally, taking the narrow approach of a small secondary school in this case study could serve as an example of a broader holistic approach, as a teaching tool and source of inspiration for educators. ...
... Apparently, aesthetic seduction and fruition in a game refuse the common, recognition or any causal nexus, although they are intertwined in the evidence. In other words, subtly, sometimes these variables mix affective performances (aesthetic sensation, in which there is playability; fun, in synesthetic emotion), sometimes they are singularized in free fictional game (22,(25)(26)(27)(28) . ...
... Self-respect is the most popular way of encouraging people to complete a task in social media, and self-respect is typically stimulated using badges and leaderboards to increase the user's self-respect [17]; thus, the developers applied self-respect in the early design of our case studies by adding virtual badges that symbolize self-respect. The use of badges based on people's self-respect is also based on a feeling of rarity, for example, when earning a Mr. Bill badge or becoming a mayor in Foursquare [63]. Rarity is a type of economic incentive. ...
... In Extremal Hamiltonian Graph Theory, the following theorem of Egawa, Glas, and Locke [EGL91] is wellknown. ...
... For example, game research suggested that stable aggregations of players present organizational aspects (Castronova, 2005). Building on Mintzberg's (1978) typology of organizations, Williams et al. (2006) established a typology of WoW's guilds to account for the fact that they differ by goals, size, and membership: 27 they found that as guild size increased, guilds were also more likely to engage in more organizational practices. As we have seen above, Vesa et al. (2017) stressed that guilds' rules attempt to resolve a number of ordinary organizational challenges, which nevertheless tend to be mundane everyday affairs. ...
... For example, as to long cycles in unweighted graphs, Locke [9] gave a generalization of the result of Dirac by showing the existence of a long cycle passing through two specified vertices, under the same condition as Dirac's Theorem. Egawa et al. [5] extended this result for the graphs with large connectivity, and in [8] further extension concerning cycles passing through a linear forest has been shown by Hu et al. The importance of these results is not only the theorems themselves but also new techniques to prove them. ...