Rana Mitter's research while affiliated with University of Oxford and other places

Publications (7)

Article
Visualizing China 1845–1965: Moving and Still Images in Historical Narratives. Edited by CHRISTIANHENRIOT and WEN-HSINYEH. Leiden: Brill, 2013. xxxiii + 489 pp. €158.00; S220.00. ISBN 978-90-04-22820-7 - Volume 216 - Rana Mitter
Article
One hundred years after the 1911 Revolution (Xinhai Revolution) in China, its meaning continues to be highly contested. Paradoxically, the more time that passes, the less certain either political actors or scholars seem to be about the significance of 1911 for the path of Chinese revolutionary history. This essay examines three phenomena: the appro...
Article
This paper argues that the first phase of the Sino-Japanese War of 1937–1945 saw a significant change in the relationship between state and society in China, leading to a greater use of techniques of classification of the citizenry for purposes of welfare provision and mobilization through propaganda, methods until recently more associated with the...
Article
China's long war against Japan from 1937 to 1945 has remained in the shadows of historiography until recently, both in China and abroad. In recent years, the opening of archives and a widening of the opportunity to discuss the more controversial aspects of the wartime period in China itself have restored World War II in China (‘the War of Resistanc...
Article
The Sino-Japanese War of 1937–45 was perhaps the single most destructive event in twentieth-century Chinese history. However, there has been relatively little attention paid to how war was experienced in the Nationalist-controlled area (‘Free China’) under Chiang Kaishek. Two autobiographical texts are examined here, one a sequence of reportage fro...
Article
The Sino-Japanese War of 1937-1947 has not been sufficiently understood as a narrative in its own right, but rather, as a transitional conflict between Nationalist and Communist rule. The examination of the visual imagery of warfare disseminated through newsprint and books is one way to reinterpret the history of this period. Through a close readin...

Citations

... The Mongolians believed it was natural for Tuva to become part of their territory and began to recruit soldiers from Tuva. Due to the difficult political situation in China after the Revolution of 1911, the former overlord of Tuva and Mongolia was unable to record this development through an international act (Mitter, 2011). It is also necessary to take into account the circumstance that Khalkha-Mongolia, having received the support of the right to exist within the framework of a wide autonomy, as part of the Republic of China, became an independent player in the political arena (Onon & Pritchatt, 1989). ...
... There are currently three dominant paradigms that conceptualise memory-making in China. The most influential one is the top-down, state-centred approach that focuses on how the CCP manipulates historical narratives for its own gain (Coble, 2007;Denton, 2014;Mitter, 2017;Mitter and Aaron, 2011;Waldron, 1996;Yang, 1999Yang, , 2000Yang, , 2003Yang, , 2005Yang, , 2010. By contrast, the social agency approach gives voice to cultural elites and emphasises the existence of an 'alternative memory' (Davies, 2005;Denton, 2019;He, 2007;Lin, 2016;Mitter, 2003Mitter, , 2007Pickowicz, 1994;Reilly, 2011). ...