Raffaela Giovagnoli's research while affiliated with Pontificia Università Lateranense and other places

Publications (37)

Article
The presented statement is part of the volume it covers a variety of responses from people who interact with art in different ways. The aim is to suggest to the participant of the contemporary world a new, personal perspective to rethink what is this area of our world that we label with art; thoughts with and without theoretical suggestions - refle...
Conference Paper
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We discuss the problem of testimony starting from the debate in social epistemology, which is strictly related to the nature of social evidence. We want to know what we can take for granted regarding shared knowledge, especially in critical situations, such as in the COVID-19 era. It is not only a matter of who we can trust or what we can accept us...
Article
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The present contribution describes the nature of social practices based on habitual behavior. The first part concerns the notion of "habit" from a perspective that crosses philosophy and science. Habits structure our daily life and possess a social nature, as shown by informally shared habits and institutionalized rituals. After a brief reference t...
Chapter
Social epistemology presents different theories about the status of shared knowledge, but only some of them retain a fruitful relation with classical epistemology. The aim of my contribution is to present a pragmatic model which is, on the one side, related to the classical concepts of “truth” and “justification”, while, on the other side, addressi...
Article
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The contemporary philosophical debate on autonomy shows several interesting perspectives that emphasize the role of social contexts for developing this human capacity. There is a shift from the classical notion of “moral” autonomy to the wider notion of “personal autonomy”, and we underscore the “substantive view” that helps to provide arguments th...
Article
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Traditional epistemology rests on sources of information and knowledge such as perception, memory, ways of reasoning etc. In social epistemology, we find the primacy of an “indirect” form of information and knowledge, namely “testimony”: a justified belief can be acquired by hearing what others say or write. We focus on the contemporary debate, and...
Article
Full-text available
Traditional epistemology rests on sources of information and knowledge such as perception, memory, ways of reasoning etc. In social epistemology, we find the primacy of an “indirect” form of information and knowledge, namely “testimony”: a justified belief can be acquired by hearing what others say or write. We focus on the contemporary debate, and...
Article
Full-text available
We introduce the workshop “Hacking Societies, Habits and Rituals” to show some important contributions on the topic and aim at stimulating further discussion.
Article
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The notion of “habit” is at the center of a lively philosophical debate that shows how some ideas from classical thought are still plausible and useful to understand human behavior in ordinary life. Following Aristotle, we can intend habits through the process of “habits learning”, which is a central topic in neuroscience and neurobiology. We inves...
Article
Full-text available
The notion of “habit” is at the center of a lively philosophical debate that shows how some ideas from classical thought are still plausible and useful to understand human behavior in ordinary life. Following Aristotle, we can intend habits through the process of “habits learning”, which is a central topic in neuroscience and neurobiology. We inves...
Article
Full-text available
We introduce the workshop “Hacking Societies, Habits and Rituals” to show some important contributions on the topic and aim at stimulating further discussion.
Chapter
Habits and rituals represent a relevant field to investigate human behavior also in comparison with non human animals and nature in general. We move from very interesting perspectives that cross philosophy and neuroscience to establish a continuity between individual and social habits and to clearly isolate what makes human rituals peculiar in the...
Book
This book reports on cutting-edge research concerning social practices. Merging perspectives from various disciplines, including philosophy, biology, and cognitive science, it discusses theoretical aspects of social behavior along with models to investigate them, and also presents key case studies. Further, It describes concepts related to habits,...
Article
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Institutions represent a solid basis to organize and stabilize human life in diferent social contexts. They are external events in the world, but they also have a strong anchorage in the mind and in last years many scholars tried to explore their cognitive ground. Starting from the original attempt of Douglass C. North, who at the end of his career...
Chapter
Social epistemology presents different theories about the status of shared knowledge, but only some of them retain a fruitful relation with classical epistemology. The aim of my contribution is to present a pragmatic model which is, on the one side, related to the classical concepts of “truth” and “justification”, while, on the other side, addressi...
Article
Full-text available
We will sketch the debate on testimony in social epistemology by reference to the contemporary debate on reductionism/anti-reductionism, communitarian epistemology and inferentialism. Testimony is a fundamental source of knowledge we share and it is worthy to be considered in the ambit of a dialogical perspective, which requires a description of a...
Article
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The present contribution aims at investigating the relationship between habits and rituals; they are based on the same processes even though they have different functions depending on the context (personal or social). Our discussion will mostly focus on the nature and function of rituals, as necessary practices in human and other animals’ social li...
Article
Full-text available
Habits and rituals play a fundamental role in human life [1] and are worthy to be considered also because they represent a form of embodied knowledge. According to Dubray [2], habits can be studied in general, but also with the focus on their physiological, psychological, ethical, pedagogical, philosophical and theological aspects. [...]
Chapter
This chapter deals with the relationship between representation and language, which becomes more relevant if we do not intend the process of forming internal representations of reality but rather the representative function of language. Starting from some Fregean ideas, we present the notion of representation theorized by Searle. According to Searl...
Chapter
Aristotle proposed a “naturalistic” epistemological perspective that rests on some fundamental notions: Perceptual judgment (passivity and activity), Simple propositions (subject and predicate), Complex propositions (syllogisms). As is well known, the “Square of Opposition” provides the possibility of a fruitful classification of reality that is ma...
Book
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This book enriches our views on representation and deepens our understanding of its different aspects. It arises out of several years of dialog between the editors and the authors, an interdisciplinary team of highly experienced researchers, and it reflects the best contemporary view of representation and reality in humans, other living beings, and...
Article
The core of the Habermasian peculiar view of religion is based on the " linguistification of the sacred ". Religion linguistifies the world through its elaboration of symbols that are embedded in ritualistic practices. As symbols establish certain semantic and syntactic relations so they introduce the very distinctions and oppositions (God vs. worl...
Article
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After explaining the interdisciplinary aspect of the series of events organized around the square of opposition since 2007, we discuss papers related to the 4th World Congress on the Square of Opposition which was organized in the Vatican at the Pontifical Lateran University in 2014. We distinguish three categories of work: those dealing with the e...
Article
Life-world represents the background of beliefs, moral values, cultural norms that are presupposed in ordinary life and communication. Our social world evolves through communication that can assume the form of the uses of language (ordinary and extraordinary). We will see that both aspects are crucial to understand the process of secularism and the...
Book
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This book is about nature considered as the totality of physical existence, the universe and our present day attempts to understand it. If we see the universe as a networks of networks of computational processes of many different levels of organization, we can learn from different sciences the processing of interacting elementary particles.
Chapter
Our contribution aims at individuating a valid philosophical strategy for a fruitful confrontation between human and artificial representation. The ground for this theoretical option resides in the necessity to find a solution that overcomes, on the one side, strong AI (i.e. Haugeland) and, on the other side, the view that rules out AI as explanati...
Article
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In this special issue we present a selection of papers from the Symposium on Natural/Unconventional Computing and its Philosophical Significance, held during the AISB/IACAP 2012 World Congress in Birmingham (UK). This article is an editorial, introducing the special issue of the journal with the selected papers and the research program of Natural/U...
Article
Full-text available
This text presents the research field of natural/unconventional computing as it appears in the book COMPUTING NATURE. The articles discussed consist a selection of works from the Symposium on Natural Computing at AISB-IACAP (British Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and the Simulation of Behaviour and The International Association fo...
Article
A relevant issue for epistemology is the distinction between expression of a “judgeable content” and “judgment”. We would suggest that Frege’s enterprise in the Begriffsschrift seems to be devoted to describe this difference from a formal point of view. For, he considers an expression as a simple or complex sign characterized by the function/argume...
Article
In my contribution I want to describe a notion of autonomy in social terms namely in discursive practices. I already presented autonomy as grounded on the Sellarsian "metaphor" of the game of giving and asking for reasons reinterpreted by Robert Brandom. The model was centered mostly on practices of justification starting from an inferentialist vie...
Article
1. Uses of the Notion of Truth My discussion is centered on the concept of experience and its relevance for the truth of assertions. I move from the uses of the notion of truth described by Richard Rorty to show the plausibility of a "cautionary" use of the notion of experience. According to this use, philosophy ought to abandon notions such as tho...
Article
The present contribution aims to establish a connection between the notion of "autono-mous discursive practice" recently introduced by Robert Brandom and the notion of per-sonal autonomy. The Locke Lectures underscore some central points to be considered in this context. (1) There are basic capacities which ground human rationality and are suffi-ci...

Citations

... Our discussion of social evidence falls in the area of "communitarian epistemology" (Welbourne, Hardwig, Kusch, Brandom) [3,4]. According to communitarian epistemology, evidence is something that emerges from the work of teams and communities, i.e., they attribute normative aspects to the content of beliefs that we share. ...
... The first is "cooperation" as a "strong" form of collective intentionality and the second is "collective recognition" as its "weak" form. We think that these two forms of intentionality correspond to the notion of "flexibility", which implies the voluntary control over our actions and to the notion of "rigidity", which characterizes the mere following of rules in the sense of routine behavior (Giovagnoli 2016(Giovagnoli , 2017(Giovagnoli , 2018(Giovagnoli , 2019. ...
... According to Marcel Mauss's theory of rituals and festivities, carnival is a total social fact, when it comes to a synergy of different kinds of institutions: religious, legal, economic and political [3]. A connection can be drawn from Carnival as a commonly celebrated ritual, as we theoretically framed it, to a social practice approach that focuses on human social behaviour (Searle, Durkheim, Weber, Scheler, and other authors are part of this theoretical umbrella framework of social practices) [4] (p. V). ...
... Habits can be both positive and negative, yet in any case markedly require little conscious thought or intention, often becoming 'second nature'. Rituals similarly involve routines, but can be differentiated by their intentionality, deep emotional involvement, and their 'socially shared meaning' [32]. Notably, rituals serve a societal function, in that they communicate and reinforce the shared values and identity within a culture [59]. ...
... Our discussion of social evidence falls in the area of "communitarian epistemology" (Welbourne, Hardwig, Kusch, Brandom) [3,4]. According to communitarian epistemology, evidence is something that emerges from the work of teams and communities, i.e., they attribute normative aspects to the content of beliefs that we share. ...
... This is likely true for many aspects related to food preparation and consumption as the individual habit of eating food was transformed by the invention of cooking into the collective ritual of sharing a meal. While habits and rituals share many similarities, rituals require deeper involvement, an element of symbolization, and collective intentionality that situates rituals within a social and institutionalized 'We' mode of enactment (Giovagnoli 2017(Giovagnoli , 2018. Rituals surrounding eating can be quite diverse, but they are fundamentally relational, typically constructing relationships to the natural world including human, nonhuman, and more-than-human relationships (Brumberg-Kraus 2020). ...
... Natural/physical/intrinsic/morphological/ computation presupposes embodiment of information processing. Embodiment is the fundamental feature of cognition, which implies that valence, affect, feelings and emotions must be taken into account as constitutive elements in the models of cognition (Damasio 1999;Dodig-Crnkovic 2017a;Dodig-Crnkovic and Giovagnoli 2017;Lyon and Kuchling 2021;Watanabe et al. 2017). They affect both System 1 and System 2 information processing. ...
... According to Kush, knowledge is a matter of consensus and this theoretical option characterizes his communitarianism. Let me conclude by pointing out a very interesting perspective among the communitarian views, which resembles the game of commitments and entitlements introduced by Welbourne: the "scorekeeping" model proposed by Robert Brandom [13][14][15][16]. Brandom does not refer to knowledge by agreement and Kusch criticized his perspective [11] (pp. 256-259). ...
... This is likely true for many aspects related to food preparation and consumption as the individual habit of eating food was transformed by the invention of cooking into the collective ritual of sharing a meal. While habits and rituals share many similarities, rituals require deeper involvement, an element of symbolization, and collective intentionality that situates rituals within a social and institutionalized 'We' mode of enactment (Giovagnoli 2017(Giovagnoli , 2018. Rituals surrounding eating can be quite diverse, but they are fundamentally relational, typically constructing relationships to the natural world including human, nonhuman, and more-than-human relationships (Brumberg-Kraus 2020). ...
... According to Kush, knowledge is a matter of consensus and this theoretical option characterizes his communitarianism. Let me conclude by pointing out a very interesting perspective among the communitarian views, which resembles the game of commitments and entitlements introduced by Welbourne: the "scorekeeping" model proposed by Robert Brandom [13][14][15][16]. Brandom does not refer to knowledge by agreement and Kusch criticized his perspective [11] (pp. 256-259). ...