Rachel Thwaites's research while affiliated with University of Lincoln and other places

Publications (12)

Chapter
In a time apparently characterised by ‘cold intimacies’ (Illouz, Cold Intimacies: The Making of Emotional Capitalism. Cambridge: Polity Press, 2017a [2007), where intimate relationships are increasingly led by economic concerns, choice is often used to explain and justify individual actions and has become ever more significant to understanding cont...
Article
Whenever there are well-publicised pressures on acute care, there is a tendency for policy makers and the media to imply that a significant number of older people may be taking up hospital beds when they do not really need the services provided there. However, evidence to back up such claims is often lacking, and existing research tends to fail to...
Article
This essay makes the case for increased use of patient-centred methodologies, which involve patients and the public, in the area of emergency admissions research in the United Kingdom. Emergency admission research has rarely made use of the patient voice when attempting to find a rate of ‘inappropriate’ admission for older people, instead focusing...
Article
This paper examines the precarious working lives of ‘emerging’ composers attempting to build a career in the world of new classical music in the UK. This topic is approached by considering the ‘composition opportunity’, success in which is seen as an important element in ‘making it’ in this sphere. We argue that such schemes in fact manifest a cruc...
Article
This article investigates the tension between originality and success for ‘emerging composers’ involved in composition opportunities in the British contemporary classical music scene. It utilises survey responses from 47 new music composers to better understand their experiences of these very public signs of compositional success. Though the narrat...
Article
Full-text available
Rapport is usually considered key to any interview situation: building the right kind of rapport can be the difference between success and failure in obtaining the required data. In feminist research, rapport is intended to be of a particular kind: created through mutual sharing, minimal power hierarchies, and a feeling of genuine trust between int...
Chapter
This chapter draws together the the principal themes of this book by providing a summary of the book's contributors' chapters. Here we revisit ideas around neoliberalism, the changing academy, early career researchers and the challenges faced particuarly by feminist academics in light of exponential changes to how universities operate globally. Fem...
Chapter
This book comes at a time of dramatic change in higher education (HE) around the globe; some of the fundamental principles underpinning HE are being questioned, forcing academics and the wider public to begin to ask what higher education is for and what the purpose of research is in society at large (for example, Collini 2012; Small 2013), as well...
Book
This book investigates contemporary naming practices on marriage in Britain, drawing on survey data and detailed interview material in which women offer their own accounts of the reasons for which they have changed or retained their names. Exploring the ways in which names are used to create and understand family, to cement commitments and make it...
Article
In this article, we define the concept of “risk work,” which aims to make visible working practices to assess or manage risk, in order to subject these practices to sociological critique. This article reviews and synthesizes existing published literature to identify components of risk work: (a) translating risk into different contexts, (b) minimizi...
Article
Choice feminism is a popular form of contemporary feminism, encouraging women to embrace the opportunities they have in life and to see the choices they make as justified and always politically acceptable. Though this kind of feminism appears at first glance to be tolerant and inspiring, its narratives also bring about a political stagnation as dis...
Article
This paper reports the findings of a review of the literature on emergency admissions to hospital for older people in the UK, undertaken between May and June 2014 at the Health Services Management Centre, University of Birmingham. This review sought to explore: the rate of in/appropriate emergency admissions of older people in the UK; the way this...

Citations

... They should be an important source of information, providing a more holistic and long-term view of the factors that contribute to hospitalizations. If patient-centred care is advocated, the patients' point of view needs to be included in the research process to centre outcomes to their interests and values [1,2]. This information is crucial to understanding the reasons for hospitalizations and the specific challenges that need to be addressed in the design of ambulatory care [3]. ...
... A recent systematic review found that men, those living in a rural area, of non-white ethnicity and those with noncancer conditions were more likely to attend the ED during the last year of life; people receiving community palliative care or hospice care were less like to attend [10]. The insights of older people and their family are essential for understanding the complex issue of frequent ED attendance, and yet there is limited patient or carer-reported evidence on this issue [11]. ...
... Due to the limited number of studies identified, this assessment was aimed at describing the studies' quality, not excluding them from the review. The quality appraisal showed that two of the qualitative studies fulfilled seven of the ten quality criteria (37,38) two of the qualitative studies and the mixed methods study fulfilled eight of ten criteria (39)(40)(41) and the other two studies fulfilled nine (42,43). The mean score of the seven qualitative studies was eight of ten quality criteria. ...
... Being open about some of my own experiences in NCT and as a student mother helped to develop rapport quickly with participants (Oakley, 2015). I took care, however, not to exploit this rapport and thereby trick participants into making disclosures they might later feel uncomfortable about (Dunscombe and Jessop, 2002;Thwaites, 2017), even though Oakley (2015) states this is unlikely in her discussion around why participants can be happy to give their time and share their responses freely and unconditionally. This seemed the case for the interviewees in the current study, who seemed to appreciate the experience of talking to me and aiding me in furthering my research aims. ...
... The complexity of emotion and emotional labour that is a part of the research process is, therefore, under-discussed. Hochschild's study (Hochschild, 1983(Hochschild, , 2003a) on the emotion work flight attendants engage in while dealing with customers and in managing their own emotions has been highly influential in studies on emotion in a multitude of different occupations and situations (see, for example, Korczynski, 2003;Yang and Chang, 2008;Thwaites, 2017). Her ideas about "framing rules" for situations and the work that is done on oneself to comply with these rules is particularly pertinent here. ...
... Yet, tradition appeared to be used often as sole justification for a practice, negating the need for any further reasoning. In this regard, it was reminiscent of the use of 'choice' in choice feminism where justifying action through the 'choice narrative' produces stagnation of political debate because censure of 'choices'and therefore, women's agency -is prohibited (Thwaites, 2017). Tradition appeared to be used in a similar vein as a self-legitimating concept, the censure of which could only produce approbation. ...
... The tensions between the traditional academic and digital scholarship 'habitus' and identities have been intensified with a growing crisis in the neoliberal academic job market, where the security of academics, especially 'early careers' , becomes increasingly precarious (Thwaites & Pressland, 2017). Without an anchor of stability, fewer academics seem to take a path deviating from the longstanding logic of doing, thinking and being in academia. ...
... Such risk cannot be eliminated, but can be assessed, controlled or prevented through intervention. Interpretations of risk are dependent on social, political and ethical constructions (Gale et al., 2016). A societal example of this is the perception by the general public that people with mental illness are a danger to society (Morgan, 1998;Szmukler & Rose, 2013) and are risky individuals who need to be controlled to reduce uncertainty. ...
... 9,10 The high number of readmissions puts a strain on hospital-based healthcare. 11,12 However, a significant proportion of these might be unnecessary 13 and may actually be detrimental to vulnerable elderly individuals. 14 The aim of the present study was to provide a comprehensive description of hospital readmission patterns in the first five years following ischaemic stroke (IS), and to characterise groups of patients based on readmission burden. ...