Rachel A. Volberg's research while affiliated with University of Massachusetts Amherst and other places

Publications (22)

Article
Full-text available
While there is evidence for self-exclusion (SE) as an individual-level harm reduction intervention, its effects on reducing harm from gambling at the population level remain unclear. Based on a review of national legal frameworks and SE programs, including their utilization and enforcement in selected high-income societies, the present analysis aim...
Article
Full-text available
Classes of obsessive-compulsive features differing both quantitatively and qualitatively have been linked to gambling disorder. This secondary data analysis sought to extend this line of investigation to examine the extent to which previously reported latent obsessive-compulsive classes may relate to externalizing conditions in a sample of 1675 twi...
Article
To date, studies of gambling harms have been limited by reliance on small samples and self-reports of behaviour. Analysis of banking transactions provides unique insights into the scope and sequencing of gambling harms at the individual and population levels, with implications for gambling policy, regulation, and harm minimization.
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims: The Prevention Paradox (PP) suggests that a large proportion of aggregate harm from gambling occurs to people who do not have a gambling disorder. However, it has not yet been tested using a population-representative sample. We aimed to test whether the PP applies to gambling in Finland. The prevalence rates of diverse harmful...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims: The Conceptual Framework of Harmful Gambling moves beyond a symptoms-based view of harm and addresses a broad set of factors related to the risks and effects of gambling harmfully at the individual, family, and community levels. Coauthored by international research experts and informed by multiple stakeholders, Gambling Resear...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The recognition of problem gambling as a public health issue has increased as the availability of gambling expands. Research has found that some formats of gambling are more closely linked to problem gambling than others. Conflicting evidence, however, has emerged, suggesting that the most important consideration is involvement (i.e.,...
Article
Full-text available
Few studies have examined problem gambling among veterans and, of those studies, there are conflicting conclusions surrounding correlates of problem gambling in veterans. Our study aims to assess problem gambling prevalence among veterans using non-Veterans Affairs data and to evaluate correlates of problem gambling among veterans in a general popu...
Article
Full-text available
Non-gambling specialist services, such as primary care, alcohol and other drug use, and mental health services, are well placed to enhance the identification of people with gambling problems and offer appropriate generalist first level interventions or referral. Given time and resource demands, many of these clinical services may only have the capa...
Preprint
UNSTRUCTURED Research on identification and treatment of problem gambling has been characterized by a wide range of outcome measures and instruments. These circumstances are problematic when, for example, comparing the effectiveness of different treatments. This protocol describes the development of the Gambling Disorders Identification Test (G-DIT...
Article
Full-text available
While population surveys have been carried out in numerous jurisdictions internationally, little has been done to assess the relative strength of different risk factors that may contribute to the development of problem gambling. This is an important preparatory step for future research on the etiology of problem gambling. Using data from the 2006 C...
Technical Report
Full-text available
In 2015, the first adult longitudinal cohort study of gambling and problem gambling was launched in Massachusetts. This report presents results from the first wave of the study with a focus on the establishment of the cohort and on the incidence of new cases of problem gambling since 2013/2014.
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report presents the results of the first patron survey at Plainridge Park Casino, completed in 2016. These surveys provide the only data collected directly from casino patrons regarding their geographic origin and expenditures. These data are important to ascertain the influx of new revenues to the venue and the Commonwealth, and to measure an...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to explore the association between problem gambling (PG) and participation in different forms of gambling in order to elucidate relationships between PG, gambling involvement and gambling intensity. Using data from the first wave of the Swedish Longitudinal Gambling Study (Swelogs) (n = 4,991), the study tested four hy...
Article
Full-text available
Recent increases in the number of online gambling sites have made gambling more available, which may contribute to an increase in gambling problems. At the same time, online gambling provides opportunities to introduce measures intended to prevent problem gambling. GamTest is an online test of gambling behavior that provides information that can be...
Article
The underlying structure of problematic gambling behaviors, such as those assessed by the South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS), remain unknown: Can problem gambling be assessed unidimensionally or should multiple qualitatively different dimensions be taken into account, and if so, what do these qualitative dimensions indicate? How significant are the...
Article
Full-text available
This study uniquely evaluates the prevalence of recreational gambling, and co-occurring conditions prior to gambling expansion in Massachusetts (MA), and assesses associations between gambling and co-occurring behavioral, and mental health disorders. Data are derived from the 2008 MA Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Logistic regression m...
Technical Report
The Conceptual Framework of Harmful Gambling (the “Framework”) is designed to achieve three key objectives, namely to: 1. Reflect the current state of knowledge (across disciplines and existing models) as it relates to factors impacting harmful gambling. While there is some discussion of linkages among factors, this publication does not provide an...
Conference Paper
Massachusetts (MA) passed an Act Establishing Expanded Gaming in the Commonwealth in 2011. Increased prevalence of gambling disorders and co-occurring behavioral health addictions is associated with greater availability and proximity of gambling venues. This study evaluates prevalence of gambling and risk factors of co-occurring behavioral health a...
Article
Problem gambling has a profound impact on family members. While this has been previously documented, this paper reports on the first study to consider the extent of this impact in Asian societies where the family continues to be a very important basis for social organization. This study, based on in-depth interviews with 50 Singaporeans with a fami...

Citations

... Several lines of evidence further indicate that there is independence among the components of the GAS. Browne, Volberg, Rockloff, and Salonen (2020) found that individuals with non-problem levels of gambling accounted for roughly 60 % of the gambling-related harms at the population level. Furthermore, treatment is only sought by a minority of individuals with PG (Slutske, 2006) despite long term remission being common (Slutske et al., 2003;LaPlante et al., 2008). ...
... Personal wellbeing has been related to cultural wellbeing in indigenous and other populations [62]. Thus, gambling participation, including its benefits and harms can affect culture in distinctive yet complex ways [16,63]. Taken together, our findings suggest that Māori and Pacific people in NZ have a higher risk for developing disordered gambling partly related to weaker social connectedness. ...
... In our participants, the most common dominant gambling type was online casino, with 63.2%, followed by online sports betting at 26.4%. This comes as no surprise as gambling problems are more common among gamblers partaking in casino gambling, bingo and sports betting (Mazar et al., 2020). It also seems like gambling online is associated with more severe gambling problems. ...
... Emotional instability, that is, lack of self-control and impulsive situations that cause tension, is a strong predictor of aggressive behavior in young offenders, present in both groups evaluated, with worse performance in men with ASPD. Both groups show defective moral judgment and deficits in perceiving social signals, giving social responses not for ethical and moral reasoning but profit or pleasure (Williams et al., 2020). Table 3 presents the results of the model fit for men and women offenders: The AIC for men and women are 1062 and 1192 respectively and the chi-square 0.855 and 0.945 respectively. ...
... population settings and using a current timeframe (Dowling et al., 2019). Despite little empirical research on the NODS-CLiP among youth, the items for loss of control, lying and preoccupation are worded similarly to the items included in the DSM-IV-MR-J which has been validated among youth (Fisher, 2000). ...
... In the 2016/2017 FTPS-Plainville there were 2 regular gamblers who reported that gambling had caused them to commit an illegal act and no one reported being arrested for committing a gambling-related crime. (It should be noted that PPC H&SC residents only constitute an estimated 11.4% of the patronage of PPC (Salame et al., 2017)). ...
... Problem gambling status was assessed with the Problem and Pathological Gambling Measure (PPGM) (Williams & Volberg, 2010. The BGPS respondents were categorized into high-risk strata (people experiencing a gambling problem, at-risk gamblers, gamblers who spent $1200 or more on gambling annually [based on the 85th percentile of gambling expenditure for all BGPS respondents], participants who gambled weekly, and participants who had served in the military since September 11, 2001 (Etuk et al., 2020;Freeman et al., 2020)) and a low-risk stratum (all other respondents). A sample of the BGPS respondents, including all of the high-risk respondents and one-third of the low-risk respondents, created an initial eligible sample of 4860 participants. ...
... Thus, in the case of gambling disorder, preventive strategies should rather re ect the second tier of action against COVID-19, that is, prevent gambling from affecting most people by limiting availability (supply) and accessibility (ease of access) to gambling. This is especially important for the more dangerous variants of gambling, such as electronic gaming machines (EGMs) and online gambling 9,10 . Unlike the variants of SARS-CoV-2, in the case of gambling we can identify previously where the different variants of "gambling virus" are, which would allow us to implement appropriate preventive measures for speci c games. ...
... Part of the explanation involves the developmental characteristics of adolescence, which is a period of particular vulnerability to engage in multiple forms of risky behavior (Jessor, 1991) and develop addiction problems due to immature self-regulation capacity, impulsivity, external locus of control, and susceptibility to contextual factors (Hollén et al., 2020). Recent studies have also demonstrated a significant increase in online gambling behavior among females, as well as changing trends in online gambling problem development (Hollén et al., 2020;McCormack et al., 2014;Volberg et al., 2018). ...
... Many state governments have been encouraging the proliferation of gambling as a means to increase tax revenues and stimulate economic development (Calcagno et al., 2010;Dadayan, 2016;St-Pierre et al., 2014). relatively easy to access (Nower et al., 2017;Williams et al., 2012). In addition, research shows that casino gambling and electronic gambling machines (EGMs) at casino and non-casino locations contribute to the development of problem gambling when compared with other forms of gambling (Clarke et al., 2006(Clarke et al., , 2012Welte et al., 2004Welte et al., , 2009). ...