Rachael Chapman's research while affiliated with Northumbria University and other places

Publications (5)

Article
With the growth of network governance, non-electoral forms of representation are of increasing significance. The claims of non-elected representatives are potentially more specific, explicit, and flexible than those of their elected counterparts. The quality of such claims can be assessed in relation to ‘authenticity’, rather than traditional crite...
Article
Full-text available
Non-elected faith representatives are increasingly involved in public policy decisionmaking. Yet, little is understood about who they represent and on what basis. Drawing on political theory and primary research data, this article examines what, in democratic terms, is going on when a faith leader sits on a local strategic partnership, a service ad...
Chapter
Government statements on civil renewal identify a role for faith groups in building the skills and confidence of their members to play an active role in society (Home Office, 2003a). UK policy in other areas also identifies a role for faith groups in: service provision (education, housing); governance (at neighbourhood, LSP and regional level); con...

Citations

... Concerns may be expressed by policy makers and commissioners of services that, by collaborating with a religiously-motivated organisation, they are laying themselves open to accusations of favouritism or hidden endorsement of a religious agenda; that public resources may be co-opted for a different set of purposes or that a religious organisation may lack transparency and accountability in the way that it distributes resources (Barclay and Hilhorst 2019). Conversely, religious organisations report that they sometimes encounter a conflict between the expectations of their parent body and the expectations of public bodies (Tomkins et al. 2015); that some legislation (for example on equalities, diversity and discrimination) conflicts with historic practices, or that public servants lack insight into the particular needs of religiously-motivated ethnic minorities that have historically lacked access to health and social care (Smith 2004;Lowndes and Chapman 2007). Finally, the emergent 'minority' status of religion generally renders it less known and more 'other' as a cultural expression (Bruce 2014) and public health officials are not educated in the role of religious communities (Long et al. 2019). ...
... However, disadvantaged subgroups within the constituency may not have the resources to approve or oppose representation. I therefore argue that the audience which claims of representation are directed at, i.e. the decision-making authority, has a responsibility to consider the legitimacy of non-elected representatives (Chapman and Lowndes, 2014;de Wilde, 2019;Guasti & Geissel, 2019a;Knappe, 2017). Building on Chapman and Lowndes (2014, p. 288), the decision-making authority may ensure that accurate representation occurs through paying attention to the non-elected representative's credibility, qualifications and connectedness. ...
... For example, some fora where interfaith dialogue takes place may have been created by local government as a means of consultation and engagement of particular faith groups within governance and decision-making processes; other engagements between local government and faith groups may be more oriented to making use of faith groups' resources and connections in delivering social welfare objectives (e.g. see Lowndes and Chapman 2005;Dinham and Lowndes 2008). Such spaces (and the terms associated with them) are controversial not just in terms of policy but also for some within religious groups; see, for example, Bretherton's (2006) political theology critique that churches should refuse the terms on which such partnerships are sought by the state. ...
... Muslim and other faith representatives have been involved in national public policy consultations and reports since at least the mid-1990s, when the Inner Cities Religious Council, of which Sacranie was a member, was asked to provide feedback on regeneration initiatives (Austin and Taylor 1998). At local level this history of faith participation is even more extensive (Chapman and Lowndes 2009). There have been particularly notable developments since the so-called 'rebalancing' of Muslim-government relations following the attacks on London in 2005. ...
... In the British context, contemporary scholarship situates religious welfare in the voluntary sphere and generally does not distinguish between secular and religious organisations. Chapman and Lowndes (2008) focus on this issue by exploring the ways in which secular and voluntary organisations are similar, arguing that it is the faith dimension itself that is the most distinguishing feature. Sider and Unruh (2004) discuss the concept of 'faith-based' in detail and provide their own typology of faith-based organisations based on American congregations: ...