R.J. O'Kennon's scientific contributions

Citations

... It differs from the closest species Arachis repens Handro by the wider leaflets, in addition to dense pubescence present on the size and colour of flowers, commonly used as an ornamental plant ( Devesa 1984). It is recorded as spontaneous in New Zealand ( Given 1979) and North America ( Nash 1976;O'Kennon et al. 1999). In SC we found numerous individuals, forming small populations in ruderal environments in the most continental part of the state, flowering and fruiting abundantly. ...
... Mature plants in this population have trunks, with some plants up to nearly nine meters tall (including crowns), and the leaves have large blades that vary from relatively flat to strongly costapalmate, the latter unlike S. minor. Plants in this population have been the source of debate and generally have been included in S. minor (Correll & Johnson 1970, Diggs et al. 2006. Trunk-bearing specimens of S. minor occur occasionally in the western portion of the range of the species, particularly in Louisiana and Texas, where they have been assigned several names, including S. deeringiana Small (1929aSmall ( : 34, 1929bSmall ( , 1933 and S. louisiana (Darby) Bomhard (1935: 44). ...
... The plant is very slender, much branched, rooted, submerged, herbaceous, grass-like, bright green, 10 to 60 cm long; roots may become long, creeping in soft mud [6]. This is one of the few genera of plants where fertilization takes place under the surface of the water [7]. A native of Africa, Middle East, Mediterranean areas, South and Central Asia, Papua and Australia, naturalized in Britain, it is becoming an increasingly invasive plant throughout the world, populating various types of still and slow-moving waters, ponds, paddy fields [8]. ...