R. J. F. H. Pinsent's research while affiliated with University of Birmingham and other places

Publications (25)

Article
This preliminary study indicates that in general practice:(1) Acquisition of appropriate clinical information is more often than not dependent on prior information of a highly selected kind available economically only to a personal doctor.(2) The amount of previous information which could be stored outside the brains of a personal doctor and his pa...
Article
Some observations have been made about the influence of the weather on the use of the general-practitioner service. It is difficult to disentangle the biological and behavioural components of these findings, but in general extremes of weather-low temperatures and sunshine in winter and high temperatures and sunshine in summer-appeared to increase t...
Article
Full-text available
The introduction of deputizing services as a feature of the delivery of primary medical care has been fraught with controversy. There are two opposing viewpoints. On the one hand, it is claimed that the substitution of a deputy for the patients’ own doctor diminishes the quality of care because the deputy lacks records or previous knowledge of the...
Article
This paper outlined the technical aspects of the analysis of data collected on summary cards. In addition a superficial analysis of the various patient and morbidity variables has been presented. This data recording method has a number of qualities. First from the clinical management viewpoint, a concise clinical history of an individual patient is...
Article
The results of this survey mainly confirm the suspected pattern of travel characteristics of patients. There were few major differences between these results and those obtained by Hutchinson, one being the smaller proportion of accompanied patients in the present survey. A main factor affecting the distance that a patient had to travel appeared to...
Article
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Citations

... We compare the results of three cross-sectional studies conducted in the same family medicine office, by the same principal investigator, in 1985 and 1995, on all patients registered in the consultation (n=1356, and n=1677, respectively), studies that were published at the time [15,16], and a cross-sectional study from a secondary analysis of an existing dataset, based on a random sample of patients from the same consultation, in 2016, also published [17]. In the first two studies (1985 and 1995) the diseases were classified by the International Classification of Health Problems in Primary Care, in its "Defined" [18][19][20]. In the cross-sectional study in 2016, diseases were classified according WHO-ICD-10 groups [21]. ...
... In other studies, the frequency of congenital anomalies was no greater than expected among the infants of women who took chlordiazepoxide during the first trimester of pregnancy (1,47,(72)(73)(74). Hartz and associates (74) conducted a follow-up study of 50,282 pregnancies that lasted for at least five lunar months. ...
... Protein-protein interaction [31] Hypertension [32] Renal diseases [33,34] Tuberculosis [35] Cardiovascular homeostasis [36] Endocrine processes [37] Atherosclerosis [38] Chronic pulmonary obstruction [39] Cancer [40][41][42][43][44] Virus infection [45] Arthritis [46] Doping [47] Citation: Plaza Thus, the concept of integrative medicine appears, which is closely linked to the concept of personalised medicine. The term "personalised medicine" was used for the fi rst time in the second half of the seventies, last century [8]. Its main goals are to optimise and to adapt the processes of diagnosis and treatment to each patient by making use of the new technologies [9] and the knowledge about the biological role of certain molecules [10][11][12]. ...
... Population-based studies also provide evidence that environmental temperature affects mortality due to both cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. However, there is little recorded evidence of an association between weather conditions and measures of morbidity such as hospital admissions or primary care consultations 26 . A study of general practitioner consultations among the elderly in Greater London found that temperature affected the rate of consultation for respiratory diseases but not that for cardiovascular diseases 27 . ...
... With great variability; variations in openness to, and acceptance of, psychiatric problems, in skills and knowledge, in decisions about when to intervene and in types of intervention. They show, for example, a ninefold variation in their capacity to recognise a psychiatric problem (Shepherd et a!, 1981),and atenfold variation in the levelof prescription of psychotropic drugs (Birmingham Research Unit, 1980).In referrals, similarly, Robertson's (1979)study in and around Aberdeen shows rates varying from 0 to 70 per 10000 population, with a mean of 30. Rural doctors refer less often than do urban doctors; older doctors more often than do younger; single-handed ones more often than do doctors in group practice. ...
... This prompted a series of articles on the safety of imipramine during the early 1970s that were based on case reports from physicians, very small uncontrolled studies, or opinions on previous reports. While some women who used imipramine or amitriptyline therapy did experience adverse pregnancy outcomes, the general conclusion was that there was not enough evidence to declare TCAs as teratogens, and the seriousness of the mental illness of the women posed a greater risk to the health of mother and baby than the medication [96][97][98]. This new attention to the teratogenic effects of drug exposure did not appear to cause researchers to conduct well-controlled laboratory studies specifically designed to investigate the teratogenic effects of TCAs using animal models. ...
... The barbiturate group of sedatives/hypnotics was in some early studies linked to an increased risk for congenital malformations (e.g., [80,81]) while in other studies no such link was found (e.g., [15]). In Sweden phenobarbital is nowadays used mainly as an anticonvulsant (see above) and barbiturates used as sedatives/hypnotics have been replaced with other drugs, notably benzodiazepines, hypnotic benzodiazepine receptor agonists (HBRA), hydroxyzine and propiomazine. ...