Qing Yang's research while affiliated with Sun Yat-Sen University and other places

Publications (2)

Article
Full-text available
Does the cue of money lead to selfish, greedy, exploitative behaviors or to fairness, exchange, and reciprocity? We found evidence for both, suggesting that people have both sets of meaningful associations, which can be differentially activated by exposure to clean versus dirty money. In a field experiment at a farmers' market, vendors who handled...
Article
Full-text available
Westerners habitually think in analytical ways, whereas East Asians tend to favor holistic styles of thinking. We replicated this difference but showed that it disappeared after control deprivation (Experiment 1). Brief experiences of control deprivation, which stimulate increased desire for control, caused Chinese participants to shift toward West...

Citations

... Money priming also triggers market-pricing mindsets (Mead & Stuppy, 2014), manifested by increased shopping price sensitivity (Kim, 2017;Ma et al., 2017) and consumer choice selectivity (Tong et al., 2013). Though primed money positively affects motivation and performance (Beus & Whitman, 2017;Moran, 2018), it also feeds need for uniqueness (Ma et al., 2017), surges selfevaluations (Trzci nska, 2020), tilts mating strategies in a way of monetarily-slanted preferences (Li et al., 2016), boosts self-sufficiency (Vohs et al., 2006), and fosters selfishness (Yang et al., 2013). ...
... Superstitious people often believe these superstitions wholeheartedly without questioning the lack of causality that underlies the claims. Indeed, surveys have shown that nearly half of respondents in China and the United States believed in superstitions or reported themselves as superstitious (YouGov, 2019;Zhang, 2012), highlighting the prevalence of superstitions globally. However, superstitious tendencies have been associated with adverse outcomes, such as risk-taking behaviours (Xu et al., 2012) and anxiety (Wolfradt, 1997). ...